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Here are all the gear videos from NAMM you should watch

The mighty NAMM show, a mind-bogglingly crowded gathering of basically anyone with anything to do with the sale of musical instruments, brought with it its usual slew of new music tech.

Now, you could wade through all the videos from that show, until your brain is numbed by trying to make out rushed, rehearsed product spiels. And you’ll find that some are … well, less important than others. We’ve instead separated the wheat from the chaff to bring you our favorite videos of our favorite new stuff. Grab the popcorn.

Even though it was announced before the show, the KORG minilogue simply stole the show. It’s what everyone wanted to talk about – even people I know with only a passing interest in new tech. With a low price and poly analog sound, plus a friendly front panel, it was an unsurprising immediate hit.

But the best way to see it is via Japan’s musictrackjp. Apart from the Japanese cool factor, you get a beautiful walkthrough of its sonic capabilities. And there are subtitles.

Behind only the minilogue in attention from synth lovers, Dave Smith and Tom Oberheim unveiled the OB-6. And it’s a hell of a beast: inspired by Tom’s original SEM, but modernized and cross-bred with a DSI synth, it’s a 6-voice monster with all the fixins’.

It’s wild enough seeing new synths from Dave and Tom at a 2016 NAMM show. But this latest announcement cemented their newly revitalized celebrity. Each synth legend had a big crowd around.

There’s tons of content out there, but the singular Cuckoo nailed the hands-on video:

The minilogue and OB-6 couldn’t compete for sheer insanity of the Arturia MatrixBrute. Glen Darcey explains to Source where this thing came from and why it was designed the way it was:

Roland’s A-01 was perhaps the announcement that surprised me the most. It’s in the dockable Boutique form factor. But it’s an unexpected combination of digital (8-bit synth, wireless Bluetooth, step sequencer) and analog (CV/gate connections onboard). It’s somewhat charming, a little like Roland’s take on a chip synth. But it’s impossible to get that from the show floor videos, so instead, let’s watch Roland’s own hands-on videos:

And let’s head to Japan for a suitably, wonderfully weirdo demo of this weird instrument:

This was an amazing show all around for expressive alternative controllers. MIDI manufacturers were talking a lot about how to add additional “expressive” data to their instruments, with the likes of Roger Linn and ROLI in attendance.

What you might have missed among these is the brilliant new Expressive E Touché. It’s a sort of shoe-sized paddle that sits next to a keyboard or other instrument. But it’s both simple and surprisingly sensitive. For me, it wasn’t a direct competitor to the ROLI Seaboard so much as something else — and something a hell of a lot better than the usual pitch and mod wheel fare.

This was the last thing I played with before leaving the show, running to catch a train, and for me it was easily a show highlight. I want one and the ROLI. It’s easier to show than explain, so have a look:

Speaking of new controllers, the Jambé is something else entirely, an expressive percussion instrument. I got a hands on with it; it’s absolutely beautiful, handmade stuff. It was first shown at NAMM last year, but I think it counts as 2016 news, as they’re just now taking pre-orders at US $799.99 to ship next quarter. And they had a lot more to show. Here’s a demo from the makers:

The KORG volca FM was my personal favorite surprise announcement. I discussed the functionality already, but here are some actual sound demos, courtesy Synthtopia and Cuckoo. (Synthtopia is slightly overstating the “exclusive” here, but – the two demos are in fact so different, it’s worth having a listen to each.) Note that this hardware isn’t entirely done yet, so some details may change.

I live around the corner from MFB, so hope to do a detailed review of the Tanzmaus and Tanzbär Lite soon. But I can’t wait to share them with you, so here goes. These are two smaller drum machines from the creator of the 522 and the Tanzbär. Audiofanzine has a walkthrough with creator Uwe:

The Avalon Bassline is an intriguing new synth, with a price of US$949. Here, the manufacturer talkes you on a walkthrough (so you don’t get any NAMM crowd noise).

It’s no secret we love Teenage Engineering’s Pocket Operator line. A demo might or might not make you follow what’s going on with them. Via SonicState:

I can’t remember who, but one CDM reader very specifically asked that we look at Keith McMillen’s K-MIX hardware. A very basic prototype was at Musikmesse last year, but now we get it in full form, and see a demo via Cuckoo:

NAMM has weirdly become the hub of modular instrument news. Once relegated to the basement – indeed, you used to expect trips to the basement to run into fellow synth lovers – modular is now literally front and center on the show floor. I remember the old days of using someone like Digidesign as a meeting point. Now it’s modular.

As modular in general grows more crowded, smart makers like this one are building more context and cohesion around their product lines. Of the American makers, Make Noise was really on fire, with both their O-Coast and the Cartesian system. Watch both via SonicState:

Pittsburgh Modular are also thinking about systems, and their new offering looks really terrific, even when up against the likes of Moog.

Tom Oberheim had offerings of his own, too, showing his SEM re-release now in Eurorack, plus a mini sequencer. It’s getting to the point where a manufacturer offering a Eurovision version of something they make is no longer news, but – well, these offerings I think will still make an impact.

As if Tom getting into modular weren’t enough, so, too, is E-MU founder Dave Rossum. And of all the makes of modular, this one I think got the most attention.

Remember when you said Audio Damage and only thought of plug-ins? Well, they’ve gotten fairly deep into hardware. For the first time, they’re doing an analog module.

And it looks like it’ll be a big hit: an analog drumvoice with waveshaper and lots of envelope features, aiming for US$450. That hits a nice niche. That, plus an updated DubJr, in the Sonic State video:

I was a great fan of what maker 4ms did with delays back before the Eurorack craze had really set in. Their dual looping delay looks really beautiful:

Of course, for the wackiest and most distinctive offerings, we return to our European neighbors Bastl Instruments from Czech. Their booth was greatly downsized from the robotic wonderland that they offered at Messe, but it was still delightful – and they keep putting out new modules, still nicely made in wood:

Soulsby also have new offerings out and were earning a lot of attention. The wild wavetables of the Atmegatron are now in Eurorack form, plus there’s an Odytron Special Edition of the 8-bit synth.

And last but not least, by far the most peculiar electronic musical instrument shown at NAMM was the bizarre ZOOM ARQ, a sort of plastic toy frisbee that you use as a sampler. Let’s watch.

The post Here are all the gear videos from NAMM you should watch appeared first on cdm createdigitalmusic.

Now you can edit a MeeBlip synth from a Web browser

Thanks to the addition of MIDI to a new generation of browsers, a browser tab could as easily be an interface to a synth – not just a place for social media distractions of pictures of synths with cats.

Now, we’ve got an (unsolicited) Web editor for our own MeeBlip synth, joining editors for Roland Boutique and Yamaha Reface instruments.

MeeBlip Web editor

First, let’s back up. Why do this with a browser instead of with software? Well, as I see it, there are two reasons for that (apart from the fun or novelty):

1. You can deploy more easily. Instead of mucking about with installers and operating system compatibility, all you have to do is point your browser at the right page.

2. You can share directly. Putting everything on the Web means easy integrated sharing and connectivity, and updates that happen instantly (see #1).

Which synths support such a thing?

Soundmondo is a site for Yamaha’s Reface synths, built by Yamaha officially. Its emphasis is on patch discovery across genres. Yamaha deserves some credit for championing the idea.

breadandbuttersounds.com is a general resource site that has built homebrewed editors for the Roland Boutique line. (That’s JU-06 Juno, JP-08 Jupiter, and a forthcoming JX-03.) These are really editor/librarians in more of a traditional sense, down to representations of the front panel.

And now, it’s our turn with the MeeBlip.

anodeweb - 1

Plug a MeeBlip into your computer via a Web interface, fire up Google’s Chrome browser, and you can send patches to your anode. Best of all, you can share your work as a Webpage (or send it via Twitter or email).

You can see it in action in this demo video:

Proving the “sharing” point, you can’t take a traditional editor/librarian and share a patch on Twitter. But you can using a Web editor.

So this link:
https://factotumo.com/blipweb/?aDecay=127&fDecay=127&sustain=127&fCut=27&wave=48&detune=62&octave=127&pwmSweep=127&lRate=83&lDepth=127&lDest=0&glide=64&vcfEnvAmount=88&lRand=127&lNoteRetrig=127&oscBWave=127

posted on Twitter as https://t.co/qpQkSDFVfc gives you a “squiggly” patch for your anode.

But there’s more. An update this week now lets this Web interface do stuff that essentially combines online documentation with hands-on, immediate results.

Maybe you never liked reading the #$*&ing manual. But what if you could play the manual?

Now, the Web interfaces supports some parameters that didn’t fit on the anode’s tiny case (glide, VCF envelope amount, LFO random, LFO note retrigger, oscillator b wave type).

And you get a reference to wavetable types.

You can also try a random patch.

Suddenly, the browser is seeming like a logical extension of a synth. And whereas sharing source code for a “native” editor app would require a lot of work setting up a development environment and dealing with cross-platform issues, it’s also easier to share, understand, and modify the source code for a Web editor. So it makes more sense as open source code than a traditional app might.

And of course, the MeeBlip (unlike the Yamaha and Roland synths) is the first open source hardware synth to have an open source Web editor (to my knowledge, anyway).

I’m really excited by this. What was once sort of a strange Web hack-a-thon novelty is finally looking useful to average users. So expect more of this.

More:
blipweb: Web MIDI Patch Editor for MeeBlip anode [factotumo.com]

MIDI-only Params and More for blipweb (re: the update)

And the editor:
https://factotumo.com/blipweb/ (Dear Apple: please add this to Safari!)

And if you don’t have a MeeBlip, well, we can fix that for you, you know:
http://meeblip.com

Congrats and thanks to Ben Schmaus for his great work!)

The post Now you can edit a MeeBlip synth from a Web browser appeared first on cdm createdigitalmusic.

iZotope’s Dynamic Delay is free – and wonderful

iZotope has a new delay out, and like many plug-in developers of late, they’re using a limited time free offer to rise above the din of Internet noise. But while the new “DDLY Dynamic Delay” is free, it’s not something cut-down.

On the contrary: you might fall in love with this delay right away.

screenshot_248

The basic idea is, DDLY is a “dynamic” delay — as in one that responds to dynamics. Now, of course, you could essentially create this with some clever routing of a dynamics processor to a delay, but integrating the two makes the process more intuitive.

The other clever feature of iZotope’s DDLY is the dual delay lines, which see at the top and the bottom of the plug-in. The granular delay path and modeled analog path each have their own character, and you can use them both at once.

I know I was supposed to be doing something purposeful with the thing, but I immediately wanted to go wild with the delicious “Trash” and feedback settings. Overdriving the DDLY gives you some wonderful effects.

Here’s some sonic results from doing that:

For more sound examples, here’s iZotope. They do some granular stuff with a synth, which you can hear is unmistakably granular but has some details to the sound that’ll make it clear you aren’t using an Ableton preset again (cough, yes, producers, we can hear you!):

And a really nice example from them on drums:

iZotope are advertising the results as “cleaner” — but maybe that’s the point, actually, that it’s clean enough that extreme feedback settings remain usable.

You can hear just how clean in this example with guitar (again, with iZotope playing with this properly, rather than screwing around like me):

Before I sound entirely positive, there are a couple of peculiar things about DDLY. One, there’s a sort of translucent interface that make me feel like I’m going slightly blind. I’m not exactly sure what the intention was, but the UI looks like something out of a 90s first person shooter that was then displayed on a fading monitor. That’s too bad, as the visual feedback is quite usable.

Two, you don’t get preset saving. iZotope do point you to the ability to use a PDF to scratch down settings. I’m not sure what the rationale was here, but on the other hand, it makes sense that you really shouldn’t think too much about saving settings, since the whole idea of the plug-in is meant to be responding to particular source material in different ways.

screenshot_246

All in all, it’s a beautiful plug-in, with that rare combination of subtle and extreme.

So, it’s free – what’s the catch?

You have to sign up with an email via iZotope. You don’t have to sign up for a newsletter, though (you can opt out of that when you register). I wound up “buying” the free download from Time & Space, which made me fill out a lot of contact info but also didn’t add any newsletters or ask for payment info. Then you get an email with a serial for authorization. You can use an iLok login optionally if you choose.

iZotope DDLY Product Page

Time + Space product page (In case you already have a login there, you can grab it even quicker)

The plug-in will go to a (still reasonable) US$49 price after the 30-day intro (mid-March 2016), with a 10-day demo.

Screenshots: CDM.

The post iZotope’s Dynamic Delay is free – and wonderful appeared first on cdm createdigitalmusic.

This app gives Elektron Analog Rytm drag-and-drop sample loading

Elektron’s machines are so beloved, they’re almost an electronic instrumental category all their own. But much of that love is focused on the hardware workflow. The challenge lately has been how to make the latest generation of Elektron hardware fit better with other gear – and specifically, the computer.

Some of those improvements are coming from Elektron. But some, too, come from third-party developers. And that’s the case with a useful Mac app.

sdsscreen

This one will be really easy to write up, because the app is – as it should be – stupidly simple.

Take a sound. Drag it to a pad. It loads on the pad.

That’s it. The app handles all the file conversion and loading and configuration for you. An upcoming version, provided in advance to CDM, also does batch transfers.

Here is in action:

This isn’t the first time a third-party developer has done something like this for Elektron. In fact, the last time, it was the same developer – Jakob Penca, with the lovely iPad app STROM, seen here previously.

There’s some cool non-obvious functionality. Drop audio, and you get Elektron-native audio. Drop video, and it extracts the audio and converts it. But drop an unsupported file – like an image – and you’ll get noise as it encodes that data directly. Very, very cool for building glitchy pad sets.

The app is ten bucks in the Mac App Store.

This sort of feature – direct sample loading – is coming to Overbridge. But there’s no reason to wait for that, when this is available now for this price. And I imagine that movie and non-audio data support might not make it into Overbridge, either.

Updated: In comments, readers point to the US$99 OctaEdit. I love the simplicity of SDS Drop, but OctaEdit gives you more power … I could easily imagine using both.

Features:

Copy and merge Banks, Patterns, Tracks, Part, Scenes etc between different Sets and Projects.

Library to store presets of virtually any aspect of the Octatrack, from Project settings to Machine configurations to FX Chains.

Sequencer module exposing every element of the Octatrack.

Dedicated Sample management module.

Chainer module to create Sample Chains.

Arp and LFO Designers.

Now, sure, readers are also complaining that they aren’t getting this support from Elektron. On the other hand, once you’ve invested in the hardware, these software add-ons surely don’t cost much. And I think third-party developers may always have a different take on how to do things than the original manufacturer, which sometimes is refreshing.

octaedit

http://octaedit.com/

Meanwhile, in Sweden … Elektron owners are seeing some additional improvements to Overbridge computer integration and the Analog series itself. Elektron reps I saw at NAMM last month were quick to emphasize that they’re focused on bettering this software side. There’s a video showing the new stuff from our friends over at Sonic State:

The banner feature is, Overbridge is no longer limited to Ableton Live. That was certainly the most popular DAW pick, but Elektron users use a lot of other DAWs, too. There’s also sidechaining and multiple outputs in AUs, plus improved performance and a better UI. In fact, this is more like 1.5 than 1.1.

Meanwhile, Analog owners get free-running LFO modes, because you don’t always want to sync, and some cool sequencing features.

To see just how passionate the Elektron user base are, just follow this sprawling forum thread in response to the Sonic State vid:

Elektron Overbridge 1.10 Review [elektronauts.com]

Thavius Beck was on-hand to show how Bitwig and Overbridge can work together at NAMM, too, and it’s always a pleasure to watch Thavius demo anything:

The post This app gives Elektron Analog Rytm drag-and-drop sample loading appeared first on cdm createdigitalmusic.

The Gender of Martial Arts Studies

 

The first written reflection that I saw on the ‘Martial Arts Studies: Gender Issues in Theory and Practice’ conference at Brighton University (5th February 2016), was this one, written by Luke White. In his response, Luke gives an account of the main issues broached during the day, before moving into some concluding considerations of wider gender issues – issues that were not explicitly tackled during the day, but that are undoubtedly central for martial arts studies to consider. As he writes:

I did find myself, at the end of the day, also asking a wider question of the event, that I think emerges from this same concern. During the day, we spoke repeatedly about the gender and sexual identities of marginalised groups – women, ethnic minorities, LGBT+ constituents, and lower class / criminal young men – but the missing issue was that of the more ‘mainstream’, ordinary, middle class – and ultimately privileged – forms of masculinity which are invested in the martial arts, too. I think this is not a poor reflection on Channon’s and Matthews’s curation of the event, but rather on the kinds of things that Martial Arts Studies itself currently seems to encompass.
I found myself increasingly wondering about the men in that very room where the seminar took place (including myself), and the kinds of ideas or experiences of masculinity that drew us into the martial arts. How might these ideas, fantasies and so on – perhaps, although seemingly far less ‘problematic’ than the young offenders discussed in [Deborah] Jump’s paper – in fact lie at the core of what’s wrong in terms of gender construction around the martial arts? Travelling home, I found myself thinking about Benedict Anderson’s notion of ‘banal nationalism’, which allowed him to think of nationalism not in terms of its extreme, pathological and spectacular varieties (when countries declare war on neighbours, or skinheads attack immigrants), but rather in the tiny, everyday ways that people are encouraged to take the nation as a reference point for their identities (from, for example, the clock-face on the news that promulgates a shared experience of time to the logo-isation of national maps in the depiction of transport networks or the assertion of a standardised national language over and against local dialects). I wonder if Martial Arts Studies needs to turn to similarly ‘banal’ aspects of gender. And I wonder if, in order to address the core from which forms of exclusion emerge, it needs to study not marginal ‘others’ but those at the symbolic centre of the social order.
I also then found myself wondering about Martial Arts Studies itself as a gendered space. As part of our explorations in the day, we thought in some detail about the ways that women, or those from the LGBT+ community, are often excluded by aspects of the environment and ritualised behaviour of gyms and dojos. But what about our academic Martial Arts Studies events? How welcome do they feel there, and how deeply has that been considered by us? Though the event at Eastbourne – with a fantastic mix of people attending – felt very inclusive, my feelings about the conference in Cardiff last Summer were rather different. I spoke to a number of women attendees afterwards who pretty much all told me that they had found it a rather uncomfortably ‘male’ space. And indeed, it struck me strongly that there was a certain machismo that surrounded a lot of the socialisation that took place around the conference. Often the first question asked was not (unlike most academic conferences!) what your paper is about or some such thing, but about whether you practiced a martial art, and if so what style. The effect of such a question can, perhaps, be a little like the aggressive questioning that Bruce Lee is subjected to by a white martial artist on the boat on the way to a martial arts contest: ‘What’s your style?’ In the film, it wasn’t just a polite inquiry, it was also a challenge. In the conference, the question was clearly less intrusive, but I wondered how non-practitioners may have experienced this kind of question. Did it imply less of a right to be there? Some of the papers, too, seemed to include hints about ‘martial credentials’ that came close at points to masculine ‘posturing’. One speaker (I shan’t name him), after an explicit a denial of homophobia, followed this up, as evidence, with what was meant to be a joke but ultimately amounted to a homophobic comment. Were some of the gendered cultures of the training hall entering into the spaces of academic debate, too? It’s often small, banal, everyday, overlooked performances that inscribe gender on a space – often much more subtle than directly homophobic or sexist comments, often far more everyday than the spectacular examples of subproletarian boxing gyms discussed at Friday’s event, and often far more inscribed into the ‘normal’ behaviour of ‘upright’ citizens – and it seems to me that in order to safeguard not only the spaces in which we do martial arts, but also the academic spaces where we discuss them in this fledgling discipline, we need a vigilance not so much on the ‘other’ but on ourselves. (Kung Fu with Braudel, 7th February 2012)

There are some really important questions being raised here, and I am grateful to Luke for posing them. In the following, I will try to respond to them, although an exhaustive response in the space of a blog post is beyond my ability, for reasons that will hopefully soon become apparent.

 As the organiser of the conference whose gender politics (or ethos) Luke’s report puts in question, I feel quite ‘close’ to this matter. I obviously do not want anyone to have come away from the conference with a negative feeling about it. However, I’ll admit, the question of the possible gender ethos of the conference had played on my mind in the run up to the 2015 conference. I myself had had some apparently ‘gender-based’ worries about the possible atmosphere: the 2015 Martial Arts Studies Conference was, for most of us who attended, the first conference of its kind in the English language, and it was drawing together a very diverse collection of people, from many different countries, many different disciplines, plus indeed a fair few from outside of academia too. So I had worried somewhat about what kind of a crowd I was assembling. Would it be masculinist? Would it be nerdy? Would people from different disciplines tolerate each other? Would people like each other? And so on. What would they have in common?

To my mind, the ‘what’s your style’ question (that Luke suggests was one of the primary questions people asked each other at the conference – ‘do you practice martial arts? What style?’) is key here. This is because, I think the question reflects an effort to make a connection. After all, at a multi-disciplinary conference on martial arts, what is the one thing that might be assumed to be held in common by all of those in attendance? An interest in martial arts. And, in my experience, an interest in martial arts is strongly correlated with an assumption that the interested party will also practice martial arts.

This is not, however, an academic assumption. It is, rather, a general assumption, at least in my experience. By the same token, academics themselves have tended towards astonishment or excitement when they learn that – like some sort of peculiar curio – I also ‘do’ martial arts. I have a particularly vivid image in my head of a colleague, a good few years ago, exclaiming with joy and laughter that he loved the fact that I actually practiced what I preached. I remember going along with the conversation, but fundamentally being confused. How could I study and write about martial arts without practising them, I wondered? It didn’t make any sense to me that I could possibly write about them without practising them.

This, then, is (or was) my initial bias. And it may be idiosyncratic, or it may reflect the bias of the field, which itself may reflect the bias of wider discursive structures or formations. For, of course, once you start to think about it, there are many ways that one might do martial arts studies without studying or practicing martial arts. Historians, for example, research and write about things that they cannot hope to practice. Film studies scholars, when they are dealing with martial arts films, are of course dealing with complex constructs that bear no necessary relation to bodily or embodied martial arts practice as many would understand it at all. As Ben Judkins recently said to me on the matter of whether martial arts scholars have to practice a martial art or not: ‘I suppose it would have to come to down to the actual details of what you are trying to accomplish, the research methods used and some fundamental tensions in what it means for martial arts studies to be an interdisciplinary project. Can Shahar write on the history of Shaolin martial arts without being a practitioner? Absolutely. [….] Could Ben Spatz have written about the somatic experience of yoga without doing it, and then understanding the many ways that practice becomes research? How about Wacquant and boxing? I suspect not’.

In our email discussion of Luke’s blog post, Ben asks ‘was that simply a bit of disciplinary discomfort manifesting itself as a cautionary warning, or do you think Luke was hitting on a more fundamental dynamic that needs to be guarded against?’ With reference to our first conference, Ben asks: ‘Was the last MAS studies a hostile place for women, or was it a hostile place for non-martial artists, or both? And is talking about one’s participation and engagement in the martial arts really a detriment to scholarship on the subject?’

There is a lot going on here, and I want us to continue to talk about it. Luke is absolutely right to pose these questions, and I agree that martial arts studies could benefit from interrogating its ‘banal machismo’, if this is one of its current norms. And it may well be. Accordingly, then, if we identify this, then we need also to ask where the field’s banal machismo might come from and what (if any) functions it might be serving. Recall that Luke reports that he ‘spoke to a number of women attendees afterwards who pretty much all told [him] that they had found it a rather uncomfortably "male" space’. Moreover, he continues, it also ‘struck [him] strongly that there was a certain machismo that surrounded a lot of the socialisation that took place around the conference’.

I am not sure what specific aspects of ‘the socialisation that took place around the conference’ that this refers to – whether it boils down to the nature of the planned events, or whether it arose within them. I also wonder about the character of the conversations in which such determinations would arise, especially when comparing and contrasting them with the conversations I had with both men and women after the conference. But rather than disputing the point, it makes sense simply to concede it, and accept it on face value, and then to stage a reflection from that point, asking questions about the emergence of machismo in the context of academic(s) discussions of martial arts – especially perhaps when those involved have a glass or two of wine working its way through their bodies.

I myself can certainly testify that my blood and energy and perhaps something that might come across as machismo rises when I am discussing anything to do with martial arts. I certainly get considerably more animated than when I am discussing, say, Levinas’ or Derrida’s ruminations on the ethics of alterity, or the Hegelian or Marxian dialectic. I certainly experience a high degree of excitement around the topics of martial arts, much more than I do when discussing other aspects of my work, from cultural theory to popular culture and politics. However, it is interesting for me to reflect, on this note, that I have myself in the past characterised the realms of political and cultural theory as ‘nerdy’ and ‘boyish’ or ‘laddish’, in perhaps precisely the way that the sociality of the first martial arts conference may have been characterised – as too macho. Maybe this is just what happens when too many men with the same passions get together…. I have encountered it not just in political theory circles (which I used to frequent but which I have substantially walked away from) but also in film studies conferences – which I am often invited to, but at which I feel significantly alienated (I don’t watch many films). At film studies conferences – and especially the socialisation that goes on around them – perhaps precisely because I cannot participate in them, I have often observed the ‘pissing competitions’ that are typically played out by men around demonstrating knowledge of evermore obscure aspects of films. Perhaps this is the same. Perhaps it is different. Perhaps homosociality is always the problem – at least if you feel you are on the outside of it.

However, if we go along with the proposition that the first Martial Arts Studies Conference suffered from ‘too much machismo’ – which I am not at all sure about – for several reasons – I also wonder whether part of the problem might boil down to the fact that the conference saw a mixture both of academics and non-academics. For many of the non-academics, this was a first foray into academia. And even for many of the academics, this was just about the first time they had ever been able to present their work on martial arts studies unashamedly. So, in this sense, the conference staged a key point of mediation or translation into the academy of a discourse that chiefly exists outside of the academy. And martial arts discourse outside of academia is not a field that undergoes the regular audits of equal opportunity or sex discrimination and diversity interrogation. In short, perhaps much martial arts language and practice is homosocial. Not all of it, certainly. But perhaps a great deal of it.

What will happen to this on its march through the institution? Undoubtedly, there will be transformation. I have written a lot about this necessary and inevitable transformation of discourses, most recently in my 2015 book Martial Arts Studies. But does this mean that martial arts studies will encounter the critical forces of self-reflexivity and feminism and transform itself into a totally ‘right on’, ‘politically correct’ or somehow essentially ‘inclusive’ discourse? I think that this is naïve. As Christopher Matthews pointed out in his presentation at the Brighton University event last week, perhaps it is inevitable that even when we try our hardest to ‘practice inclusivity’, there will always be forces and antagonisms that lead to the generation of ‘exclusions’. In this light, it may be that questions of ‘gender’ are not the root issue here, and that gender may amount to only one possible kind of a whole host of possible nodes or sites of antagonisms of exclusion.

This is not to say that I disagree with Luke’s suggestion that martial arts studies postulate and interrogate its own ‘banal machismo’. I am all for that. It is rather to say that such an interrogation need not take place by way of simple ‘off the peg’ categories like gender, and could perhaps be better explored according to less freighted paradigms, such as, for instance, the question of whether the aim of inclusivity can ever be possible without exclusion.

Watch Una Corda, a software piano with a difference

The piano has been living with a beautiful legacy, but that legacy can double as tyranny. The Steinway Model D, favorite instrument of mine that it is, has also frozen the technological development of the keyboard instrument.

And that’s why the Una Corda is different. Built custom by David Klavins, and associated with that builder’s collaboration with pianist Nils Frahm, this lightweight piano is unlike any you’ve seen or heard before. And now, you can get a taste of playing the real thing with a software instrument.

For full background on the instrument, here’s our 2014 story, including an interview with Mr. Klavins. I have to say, as a piano nerd who came to music in general through that instrument, it’s one of the favorite things I’ve ever run on CDM. And piano tech itself to me is reasonable fodder for this site:

Acoustic Revelation: Inside the Una Corda, the 100kg, 21st Century Piano Built for Nils Frahm

I’m still hoping to save up for my own, someday.

In the meantime, though, there’s a Native Instruments software instrument. This isn’t the first or the most unique NI recreation of a Klavins instrument. That honor would fall to The Giant. Whereas you actually might seriously consider getting an Una Corda, this other instrument – not so much. The Klavins Piano Model 370i original is actually built into a wall, stands 9 meters tall (that’s 30 feet), and requires stairs to get to the keys.

niucstring

But just because the Una Corda is more practical as an instrument doesn’t mean it’s less desirable for its sound. The central innovation is to transform the soundboard, with a light, delicate surface that resembles a guitar more than a big, bulky grand. That changes the strings, too.

I really like the fewer-key version, but for NI, Klavins built an 88-key instrument. That gives you fragile, gorgeous sounds across a big range.

Even the Native Instruments product site is unusually pretty. This is obviously a project for love more than commerce.

For more on the instrument, though, we can enjoy some videos. Frahm and Klavins are featured in a short conversation about the instrument:

And as for the software, here’s a walkthrough /jam by our friend Cuckoo:

Plus the official walkthrough by Uli Baronowsky, who made the software instrument for NI:

Una Chorda is a $149/149€ Kontakt instrument.

It’s thoroughly enjoyable stuff. I’m keen to spend more time with the software instrument, so expect more.

And for kicks, from Erased Tapes, an evening with Ólafur Arnalds and Nils Frahm — which would basically be one of my top ways to spend an evening, period:

The post Watch Una Corda, a software piano with a difference appeared first on cdm createdigitalmusic.

AutomataCon: a new convention for artists, collectors, historians, and enthusiasts of automata

There is an upcoming event that EVERYONE who reads this blog should know about. The event? AutomataCon. That’s right…a convention for us! The press release below says it all. I will be there. I hope you will too!

AutomataCon is a newly conceived convention of and for artists, collectors, historians, and enthusiasts of automatons and related kinetic art. It is a three day event being held March 18th – 20th, 2016 at and in conjunction with the Morris Museum in Morristown, New Jersey, home of the Murtogh D. Guinness Collection of Mechanical Musical Instruments and Automata.

The goal of the convention is to gather people from around the world to share ideas, build relationships, and grow interest in automata new and old. As can be seen from our ever-growing Attendee Gallery, beginners as well as some of the premier artists, collectors, historians, and authors in the automaton community from around the world plan to be in attendance. The convention will include a variety of private and public programming, including: social gatherings, museum tours, panel discussions, live demonstrations, workshops, presentations, and an exhibition. There will also be a premier showing of the extremely rare 1928 film, Le Monde des Automates, in the museum’s Bickford Theatre. Originally created as a typical period silent film using hand-driven cameras, an accompanying sound track was added shortly thereafter, making this one of the first Swiss-made sound films. About 25-30 minutes in length, it was intended to accompany Alfred Chapuis & Eduard Gélis’ foundational 2 volume book by the same title, and documents some extremely rare automata plus a truly unique mechanical musical instrument, the Violinista by Boreau & Aubry (1918-22), in action. A fabulous historical document!

The idea for a convention stemmed from the fellowship shown on the Automata / Automaton Group and Mechanical Adventures group on Facebook. The true value of the convention will be the relationships built and knowledge shared when passionate people of common interest come together. As such, the success of the convention will depend on the attendees themselves. In the end, we are optimistic that great things will come. Please join the Facebook event page for the latest news on the convention.

Visit the event website for more details and to make your reservations.


Sakamoto and Alva Noto again create electronics, scoring masterpiece

I suspect many electronic music aficianados have the soundtrack for the film The Revenant on repeat who haven’t even seen the film. Any new Alva Noto/Ryuichi Sakamoto collaboration will get the attention of lovers of minimal electronic achievement, with good reason.

And The Revenant might just be the perfect landscape for that collaboration. Its marathon portrait of bleakness and intense, lonely revenge make the film a platform for a perfect Alva Noto/Sakamoto score.

Carsten Nicolai’s long-running collaboration (as Alva Noto) with Ryuichi Sakamoto has been a benchmark in what electronic/acoustic synthesis can be. But even as a fan of their creative intersections, this soundtrack is special. It is an essay in texture, one in which eventually the boundary between acoustic and electronic disappear.

This interplay can’t be called new any more. Electronic sounds shares a timespan with the history of cinema. From the Theremin to the ANS Synthesizer (see Tarkovsky) to Louis and Bebe Barron’s homemade electronics to Wendy Carlos to Vangelis, film has often been the medium through which the world has come to know electronic sound’s most adventurous sounds for the first time. The big screen led the home stereo.

But, it’s a shame that after those leading-edge moments of cinema, we haven’t seen synths as the norm so much as the exception. Moreover, the fusion of synthesis and acoustic sound in film still seems a rare feat – even though it ought to be the perfect place to execute that synthesis, even for general audiences.

Ryuichi_Sakamoto_Carsten_Nicolai (1)

That means pairing the right people, though, not pairing the right technology. And this seems as good an example as any. I’m surprised when Nicolai and Sakamoto are called “unlikely.” Perhaps in pre-unification Germany, peering into the future, the artistic couple would have been historically or geographically improbable. (It’s not that the DDR was universally disconnected from the globe – electronic composers in the right positions had unique access, though perhaps not the band of East German brothers who started Raster Noton.) And that happy fall of the Wall here is hugely welcome.

But aesthetically, the combination seems rather inevitable. These are two minds who exemplify minimalism at its most essential and versatile, each comfortable across media.

Sakamoto is at the apex of his economy in the music for The Revenant. The thematic gestures in the string writing are as suspended as a breath caught in frozen air, as aching as a sigh. (Listen to “Hell Ensemble” or “The Revenant Theme.”) The constantly downward-descending modal minor writing is endlessly unresolved, balancing on edge. It is unmistakably Japanese, but also recalls baroque laments, an unending spiral descent of incalculable despair. Oh, and – somehow this sparing handful of notes is oddly hummable. That melodious romanticism, if stripped down, gets clawed to the bone as the plot progresses.

revenant-gallery-15-gallery-image

But even before getting to the electronic contributions, the recording production and orchestral writing are themselves purely timbral in a way familiar to synthesists. In more incidental moments, glassy string textures seem themselves to be almost electronic – pure surface, almost unmoving, executed expertly by Berlin’s Stargaze orchestra. Stargaze themselves are ideally tailored for the project, in contrast to the epic Hollywood contributions last year of the LSO to wars in the stars. Like the composers, stargaze are comfortable with music classical and new, electroacoustic avant garde and pop as well as the usual “sustain this string harmonic without us hearing any bowing for as long as the director damn well pleases” acrobatics.

Multi-instrumentalist Bryce Dessner (known to hipsters more for The National) fits nicely into this ensemble as a co-composer and member of the band. In fact, it’s not hard to imagine Sakamoto/Alva Noto/Dessner in future.

But aprospos to this site, let’s talk about electronics.

Raster Noton, the label Nicolai co-founded, celebrate a big landmark anniversary this year. And they come from roots in a Communist-era scene that meant scrounging electronics wherever they could be found, rather than the conspicuous consumption of pricey gadgets, displayed in lavish studio walls like hunting trophies. (Not that there’s anything wrong with that, but you get my point.)

What’s beautiful about Nicolai’s understated contributions to this record, as with past Raster Noton efforts, is that electronics can be naturalistic.

So, when we talk about The Revenant being shot in natural light, with no CGI, an epic wilderness expedition in itself, we can also be encouraged that electronic textures don’t feel out of place.

Here, electronics don’t represent alien flying saucers or futuristic cities or the insides of computers or pounding nightlife. They add colors and textures that blur easily with those in the orchestral score. They reveal the weight of moments of emotional desperation, of passion, and do so as economically as the string textures.

revenant-gallery-03-gallery-image

The coexistence of electronics with scored material is very much by design. As Nicolai told WXQR:

Specifically for this movie, because I knew it’s was going to be a classical score, I tried to record electronic music in a way that sounds very organic, that sounds kind of acoustic rather than electronic. So, I really tried to change the electronic sound in such a way that it could easily work together with the classically-recorded score.

The “Dream” sequences the two make together, with glacier-sized reverbs full of icy noise and urgent rhythmic pulses, are exquisite. As always, Nicolai lets the aesthetic of the medium be part of the timbral message.

But it’s interesting to learn that in this case, vintage DDR hardware or some elaborate software concoction aren’t the tool of choice, but iPads. The focus directly on sound itself seems to fit the score. Again, talking to WQXR:

For this, because I needed to be very flexible, I was basically arriving with many software-based synths and I did everything with basically one laptop. I composed everything inside that laptop, or sometimes I recorded weird sounds from natural things or iPads; I used a lot of iPads as well. Sometimes, I wanted to use just a simple recording of a stone or something, so I needed something of that quality of sound, so I just recorded it and used it and processed it so you can’t really hear that original sound inside it. I would know that for a specific moment that I would need something like that quality of sound.

Worth reading that whole interview:

Interview: Alva Noto on Co-Scoring ‘The Revenant’ [WQXR NYC]

Or listening:

But I think it’s worth climbing up on the mountaintops (ahem) and talking about the significance of this sort of work. We need to begin to appreciate electronics as an essential element in orchestral writing, in scoring. It’s lazy to call the synthesizer synthetic, to call the computer artificial. We need a reckoning for how they fit into our culture.

And while the film is about loneliness, this kind of attention for the medium shouldn’t be quite so lonely. So I’m glad to have this work as added inspiration. It does so much with so little, it makes a lot of us want to do more.

For more on this collaboration in general, Red Bull Music Academy have an extensive interview with both artists:

Video is also available from the RBMA lectures

NPR, as it often does, has the smartest review, from the end of last year on their First Listen program.

Listen to the soundtrack via Spotify – or vinyl, when it comes out later this month (but I can’t embed that, yet).

Photo stills courtesy 20th Century Fox.

The post Sakamoto and Alva Noto again create electronics, scoring masterpiece appeared first on cdm createdigitalmusic.

Link is out of beta; videos, what’s new in Live 9.6

The funny thing about Ableton Link is that it doesn’t require Ableton Live. It isn’t even an app. It’s a sync technology, one that allows software to jam together, wirelessly, without any one clock having to be the source or “master.”

But as of today, if you do use Ableton Live, that wireless magic is built-in – and requires almost no configuration.

Live users can jam with other Live users. Live users can jam with apps. If you were on the beta, you’ve been doing this already, but with Live 9.6, the functionality is out of beta.

link

Link comes to Ableton Live

In case you weren’t already using the Link beta for Ableton Live 9.5, Live 9.6 quietly adds a “Link” section to preferences (in a tab now renamed “Link/MIDI”). And when connected to a WiFi network with Link devices on it (either iOS or other laptops running Ableton Live), you’ll see sync abilities.

To make this play nice with other sync tech, Link and The Bridge (if any of you still use that) are mutually exclusive, and each is disabled if running as a ReWire slave (if any of you do that).

Meanwhile, iOS developers have been busy. They’ve been making not only demos, but real-world jam sessions.

First up, a bit of an exclusive – one of my long-time favorite apps, SoundPrism from Audanika, is now updated with Link support. It’s not live on the store until tomorrow Thursday, but it brings some cool sync functionality to a lovely graphical touch instrument.

And more jams from other iOS devs, showing just how many apps support this.

Previous coverage (okay, you can tell we’re a bit excited about this):
A new free app bridges Ableton Link and MIDI (this explains how to work with iOS and MIDI hardware)

A flock of iOS devices can now jam with Ableton Link

Link could change how you play music, even without Ableton

And as before, you can find out more – and even sign up for the SDK if you’re an iOS developer.

https://www.ableton.com/en/link/

To me, the big remaining question about Link is if and when we’ll see a desktop SDK. I’d love to see a Traktor user switch off with a live set in Ableton in a DJ booth without dropping sync, for instance, or see Live users jamming with FL Studio and Reason users… and the list goes on. I expect it’s coming, and I expect you’re as enthusiastic about that as I am.

Also, new in 9.6

Live 9.6 isn’t just about Link. A whole slew of stability improvements and fixes are in there, too. (I was much happier using the beta of this release after a couple of hiccups in 9.5).

You can check the release notes for fixes, but I’m most interested in what they’re doing with control surfaces and Simpler.

Arturia fans, there’s now control surface support for KeyLab, BeatStep, and MiniLab.

Hackers, Live’s Python interface finally supports Python 2.7. (There’s also something very cool coming to Ableton Live called the Connection Kit, which brings new options to people using technology like OSC and Arduino. They’re demoing that here in Berlin during CTM, so I’ll report more on that once I’ve had a look.)

Meanwhile, in Simpler, you see Warp mode parameters (grain size, flux) in real-time rather than per-note, improved visualizations, and other tweaks.

Oh, yeah, and if you hate Live 9.6’s clip coloring, you can bring back random clip coloring again.

9.6 is a free upgrade for current users.

The post Link is out of beta; videos, what’s new in Live 9.6 appeared first on cdm createdigitalmusic.

The Passing of my Popular Culture module

I didn’t know it when I was teaching it this year, but this year would turn out to be the last year that my trusty old BA Popular Culture module would run. I found out recently that it’s no longer needed as a core course, so this seemed like the right time to trade it in and devise some new modules. (I’ve chosen ‘film and cultural theory’ and ‘martial arts and media culture’ as my new ones, starting next year.) Anyway, for the sake of posterity, I thought I’d share the content of the module here – with weekly overviews and links to the lectures as I recorded them. Hopefully some may find something worth looking at here. Enjoy! (Sniff…)

Popular Culture - MC3577 – Cardiff University

This module focuses on some of the major themes and topics in the realms of popular culture. It introduces students to the most common examples and forms of what is taken to be popular culture, and examines the film, media, journalistic, political and academic debates associated with these examples. The module introduces students to the forms and developments of common debates, and develops students’ knowledge of the specific contributions of media and cultural studies scholarship in these areas. In doing so, the module equips students with a developed awareness of popular cultural debates and the specificity of cultural studies orientations to popular culture.

Week-by-Week:

  • Week 1 – (28th Sept) – Is Popular Culture Popular?
  • Week 2 – (5th Oct) – Is Popular Culture Stupid?
  • Week 3 – (12th Oct) – Is Popular Culture Meaningful?
  • Week 4 – (19th Oct) – Is Popular Culture Chosen, or Imposed?
  • Week 5 – (26th Oct) – Is Popular Culture Political?
  • Week 6 – (2nd Nov) – Is Popular Culture Sexist?
  • Week 7 – (9th Nov) – Is Popular Culture Racist?
  • Week 8 – (16th Nov) – Is Popular Culture separate from our bodies?
  • Week 9 – (23rd Nov) – Essay Preparation (Due 27th Nov, 4pm)
  • Week 10 – (30th Nov) – Is Popular Culture Imaginary?
  • Week 11 – (7th Dec) – Is Popular Culture Anything?

Week 1 – (28th Sept) – Is Popular Culture Popular?

The module commences with introductions, a module overview, an explanation of what is expected of you, information about forms of assessment, timetable, etc.; and then an introduction to some of the key questions that will occupy us throughout the module. To begin, this week we will pose the question of cultural value: what is to be valued and why? The answer to this question requires (and implies) an answer to the question of ‘what is culture?’ This is a very long-running debate. We shall look at the way some time-worn debates can still be seen to be raging in contemporary culture, by examining the question of cultural value in popular (and unpopular) culture.

Primary Reading:

  • Bowman, Paul (2012). Chapter 1, ‘Culture is (not) the Media’. Culture and the Media. Basingstoke: Palgrave. Pp. 4-25.

 
Secondary Reading:

  • Raymond Williams, ’Culture and Masses’, Popular Culture: A Reader (Sage, 2005), ed. R. Guins and O. Cruz.
  • Storey, John (2006). Cultural theory and popular culture: an introduction. 4th ed. ed. Harlow: Pearson Prentice Hall.

Week 2 – (5th Oct) – Is Popular Culture Stupid?

Lecture, part one.
Lecture, part three.

This week we will look at the various ways in which popular music has worked as an important cultural and even political force. Subcultural movements have often been organised by music; various forms of music have often been decried and denounced by both philosophers and cultural commentators of all stripes. So this week we will look at the structures of these sorts of debates, responses to and uses of popular music in order to gain insights into the stakes and significances of music and popular culture.

Primary Reading:
·      Bowman, Paul (2012). Chapter 2: ‘Media is (not) the Culture’. Culture and the Media. Basingstoke: Palgrave. Pp. 26-48.

• Theodor W. Adorno, ‘On Popular Music’ 1st published in: Studies in Philosophy and Social Science, New York: Institute of Social Research, 1941, IX, 17-48.

 
Secondary Reading:

• ‘Take your partner by the hand: Dance music, gender and sexuality’, Ewan Pearson and Jeremy Gilbert, Discographies: Dance, Music, Culture and the Politics of Sound (London: Routledge, 1999), pages 83-109.

·      Bowman, Paul (2008). Chapter 5, ‘Counter-Culture versus Counter-Culture’. Deconstructing Popular Culture. Basingstoke England; New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Pp. 105-115.

 
Week 3 – (12th Oct) – Is Popular Culture Meaningful?

Lecture, part one.

Lecture, part two.

This week we look at how values and meanings are made: How does something mean anything? How is meaning made or transformed? This week focuses on the significance of the approaches of semiotics (the ’science of signs’) for the study of how meanings are produced, circulate and change. It looks specifically at the ideological and propagandist uses of signifying practices, but also differentiates between propaganda and ideology in a more cultural sense. The key figures discussed will be the works of Ferdinand de Saussure, Roland Barthes and Stuart Hall.

Primary Reading:
·      Barthes, Roland (1993). Mythologies. London: Vintage.

• Hall, Stuart (1980), ‘Encoding/Decoding’, Culture, Media, Language: Working Papers in Cultural Studies, 1972-79, ed. Stuart Hall, Dorothy Hobson, Andrew Lowe and Paul Willis, London: Routledge: http://www.scribd.com/doc/8646099/encoding-decoding-stuart-hall

 
Secondary Reading:
·      Chandler, Daniel (no date). Semiotics for Beginners. http://www.aber.ac.uk/media/Documents/S4B/semiotic.html
·      Silverman, Kaja (1983). The Subject of Semiotics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Week 4 – (19th Oct) – Is Popular Culture Chosen, or Imposed?

Lecture, part one.

Lecture, part two.

One of the first approaches to the notion of subcultures was broadly derived from semiotics. The study of meaning-making systems was combined with approaches from sociology and ethnography in order to produce the notion and the study of ‘subcultures’. This week we look at this ground-breaking work in cultural studies and consider its importance and limitations as well as looking at the development of approaches to the question of cultural identity that have taken place since the development of the notion of subculture.

Primary Reading:
·      Hebdige, Dick (1979). Subculture, the meaning of style, New Accents. London: Methuen.

• Adorno and Horkheimer, ‘The Culture Industry: Enlightenment as Mass Deception’, which can be found online, at http://www.marxists.org/reference/subject/philosophy/works/ge/adorno.htm

 
Secondary Reading:

• Sarah Thornton, ‘The Media Development of “Subcultures” (or the Sensational Story of “Acid House”)’, Popular Culture: A Reader (Sage, 2005), ed. R. Guins and O. Cruz.
• Gilbert, J., and Pearson, E. (1999), “Chapter 1. The Tribal Rites of Saturday Night: Discos and Intellectuals”, Discographies: Dance Music, Culture and the Politics of Sound, Routledge, London.
• Cohen, S. (2002) Folk Devils and Moral Panics: The Creation of Mods and Rockers. Third edition. London and New York: Routledge (1972).
• Hall, S. et al. (1978) Policing the Crisis: Mugging, the State, and Law and Order. Houndsmills and London: Macmillan.
• Thompson, K. (1998) Moral Panics. London and New York: Routledge.

 

Week 5 – (26th Oct) –  Is Popular Culture Political?

Lecture, part one.
Lecture, part two.

This week we turn to the question of cultural politics by looking into the various forms of popular counter-culture. We look at some key coordinates of the formation of countercultural ideologies and outlooks. This is a hotly contested issue: is counter-culture ever political? Does it ever make any real difference? If so, to what? How? Are there still counter-cultures? Have there ever been? ‘Counter’ to what? Why? And with what consequences? We will read and discuss Heath and Potter’s argument about countercultures in The Rebel Sell: How the Counter Culture Became Consumer Culture – a book which is very critical of the ideas and claims about counter-culture.

Primary Reading:

• Heath, Joseph, and Potter, Andrew (2005). ‘Being Normal’, The Rebel Sell: How the Counter Culture Became Consumer Culture, Capstone. Pp. 68-99.

·      Bowman, Paul (2012). Chapter 3, ‘Media Representation and Its Cultural Consequences’. Culture and the Media. Basingstoke: Palgrave. Pp. 49-66.

Secondary Reading:

• Arditi, Benjamin, and Valentine, Jeremy (1999), Polemicization: The Contingency of the Commonplace, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

·      Bowman, Paul (2008). Chapter 4, ‘Street Fetishism: Popular Politics and Deconstruction’. Deconstructing Popular Culture. Basingstoke England; New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Pp. 80-101.
·      Bowman, Paul (2008). Chapter 5, ‘Counter-Culture versus Counter-Culture’. Deconstructing Popular Culture. Basingstoke England; New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Pp. 105-115.

Week 6 – (2nd Nov) – Is Popular Culture Sexist?

Lecture, part one.

This week we explore the proposition that popular culture is sexist. We look at examples of gendered representations and interrogate such key concepts sexism, patriarchy, misogyny and the theoretical concept of phallocentricity. Examples will mainly be drawn from the field of music videos.

Primary Reading:
·      Bowman, Paul (2012). Chapter 4, ‘Filming Culture’. Culture and the Media. Basingstoke: Palgrave. Pp. 67-85.

• Laura Mulvey, ‘Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema’ (1975), Originally Published in Screen 16.3 Autumn 1975 pp. 6-18. http://www.scribd.com/doc/7758866/laura-mulvey-visual-pleasure-and-narrative-cinema

 
Secondary Reading:

• Brunsdon, C., (2000), ‘Post-Feminism and Shopping Films’, in The Film Studies Reader, ed. Hollows, Hutchings & Jankovich (London: Arnold, 2000), pp. 289-299.
• Power, Nina (2008), One Dimensional Woman, Zero Books: London.
• Gayle Rubin, ‘The Traffic in Women’: http://www.scribd.com/doc/17220155/The-Traffic-in-Women
• Butler, J., Gender Trouble: http://www.scribd.com/doc/10263585/Judith-Butler-Gender-Trouble-Subjects-of-Sex-Gender-Desire
• Popular Culture: A Reader (Sage, 2005), ed. R. Guins and O. Cruz. Chapters 4, 20, 30, 33, 34.

 

Week 7 – (9th Nov) – Is Popular Culture Racist?

Lecture, part one.
Lecture, part two.

This week we explore popular representation in terms of its racial biases. We examine the ways that ethnicity functions as a marker of difference in different ways, depending on time and place, and consider the cultural, ethical and political implications of this.

Primary Reading:

• Hall, Stuart (1999), ‘The West and the Rest: Discourse and Power’, Formations of Modernity, eds. Stuart Hall and Bram Gieben. Cambridge: Polity.

·      Bowman, Paul (2012). Chapter 4, ‘Filming Culture’. Culture and the Media. Basingstoke: Palgrave. Pp. 67-85.

Secondary Reading:

• Said, E. W. (1979), Orientalism: http://www.scribd.com/doc/17226810/Said-Edward-Orientalism
• Chow, Rey (2002), ’Brushes with The Other As Face: The Inevitability of Stereotypes in Cross Ethnic Representation’, The Protestant Ethnic and the Spirit of Capitalism, Columbia University Press: New York.
• Stuart Hall, ‘Gramsci’s Relevance for the Study of Race and Ethnicity’: http://www.scribd.com/doc/19747301/stuart-hall-gramscis-relevance-for-the-study-of-race-and-ethnicity
• Rattansi, Ali (2011), Multiculturalism: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Week 8 – (16th Nov) – Is Popular Culture separate from our bodies?

Lecture, part one.

Lecture, part two.

Are our bodies inside or outside of culture? On the one hand, they are what seems most natural, but on the other hand, they are constantly worked upon and worked over by cultural processes – rules, habits, law, diet, education, training, discipline, design, attire, desire, fantasy, values, aspirations, procedures, judgements, and so on. This week we examine some of the ways that culture works on the body, by looking at the work of Michel Foucault and Foucault-inspired scholarship. We connect such historical work with ongoing processes in popular culture and our everyday lives.

Primary Reading:
·      Foucault, Michel (1977). ‘Panopticism’. Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison. 1st American ed. New York: Pantheon Books.

Secondary Reading:
·      Foucault, Michel (1978). The History of Sexuality, Volume 1. London: Penguin.

• Grosz, Elizabeth (1994), ‘The Body as Inscriptive Surface’, Volatile Bodies: Towards a Corporeal Feminism, Indiana University Press.

 
Week 9 – (23rd Nov) – Essay Preparation

There is no lecture this week. Seminars for essay preparation only.

Week 10 – (30th Nov) –  Is Popular Culture Imaginary?

Lecture, part one.

Lecture, part two.

Is popular culture tied to our imaginations? What might this mean, and how might it happen? What ramifications does it have? This week we will explore the status of the imagination in relation to culture and popular culture.

Primary Reading:

• Said, Edward W. (2005), ‘Invention, Memory, and Place’, in Pepi Leistyna, ed., Cultural Studies: From Theory to Action, Oxford: Blackwell, pp. 256-269.

Secondary Reading:
·      Anderson, Benedict (1991). Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism – Revised Edition. London: Verso.

Week 11 – (8th Dec) – Is Popular Culture Anything?

Some problems recording the lecture this week. The lecture fragments are all here.

Is popular culture a thing? Is it something particular? Can it be just anything? Is it nothing? Does it have any necessary characteristics? What determines them, and why? This week we approach these questions in terms of everything that has gone before in the module but filtered through the lens provided by Raymond Williams, who, in a classic text of cultural studies, argues that culture can be approached according to a few key terms and questions.

Primary Reading:
·      Williams, R. (1977), ’Dominant, Residual and Emergent’, Marxism and Literature, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Secondary Reading:
·      Bowman, Paul (2007), Post-Marxism Versus Cultural Studies: Theory, Politics and Intervention, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press,  pp.10-25.

So, that’s that, then. Eight years. Done.

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RSS medialab prado

  • Presentación de la red temática de Open Data y Ciudades Inteligentes February 12, 2016
    Durante esta hora y media presentaremos los objetivos generales de la red temática de Open Data y Ciudades Inteligentes, los trabajos que ahora mismo están llevando a cabo los grupos de investigación involucrados en la red, y abriremos una ronda de discusión sobre los retos (sociales y tecnológicos) que deben afrontar las ciudades en relación con la adopción […]
  • Final Worksession Objects in Common February 10, 2016
    This worksession is the final event of a series of activities organized under the umbrella Common objects. It's organized by Constant in collaboration with Medialab-Prado. Makers and thinkers will participate to look at the potential but also at the problems of sharing practices, processes of manufacturing and the documentation of physical objects. […]

RSS netEX

  • call: Visions in the Nunnery 2016
    Deadline: 13 June 2016 Call for entries Visions in the Nunnery 2016 A renowned showcase of recent performance and moving image works by emerging and established artists, Visions aims to offer an international overview of the challenging and thoughtful uses of these ever shifting mediums. We are now inviting artists from all over the world to submit moving im […]
  • call: M1 Singapore Fringe Festival 2017
    Deadline: 4 March 2016 Call for entries M1 Singapore Fringe Festival 2017 that welcomes proposals for the theme of ‘Art and Skin‘. We are looking for works in all disciplines that will fall within the theme from professional Singapore and international artists/ companies. Please submit your application by 4 March 2016. The Festival takes place in Singapore f […]
  • call: Short Manuscripts Documenting Projects In Creative Technologies
    Deadline: 1 June 2016 call for entries Short Manuscripts Documenting Projects In Creative Technologies 4th Foundation Press (http://www.4thfoundation.com/) is seeking short manuscripts documenting projects in creative technologies. These should be written for an audience of K-12 learners as new so-called ‘coding curricula’ are beginning to be rolled out inte […]
  • call: Aesthetica Short Film Festival
    Deadline: 31 March 2016 Call for entries Aesthetica Short Film Festival Entries are open for the 6th edition of the BAFTA Qualifying Aesthetica Short Film Festival. Submit your short films for a chance to win screenings at a leading UK short film festival, plus win awards and gain further exposure through the ASFF Film Tour. In 2015, ASFF attracted 20,000 ad […]
  • call: Experimental Video Residency
    Deadline: 1 March 2016 Call for entries 2nd VÓRTICE: Experimental Video Residency opens his application call 2016 During 10 days in Valparaíso, 16 audiovisual artists will have the opportunity to meet in order to share experiences, assist to specialization labs and be mentored by national and international consecrated professionals of experimental video. By […]
  • call: Hotel Mariakapel Residency
    Deadline: 1 June 2016 Call for entries Hotel Mariakapel Residency Once a year HMK sends out an open call for artists and curators to hand in a proposal for a residency period. A residency typically lasts for 4 or 8 weeks (note: the chapel is only available for up to 4 weeks before an exhibition). During a stay in our guesthouse, residents are invited to deve […]
  • call: Jacket Video Art Showcase
    Deadline: 4 March 2016 Call for entries Jacket Video Art Showcase OPEN CALL FOR VIDEO ART The Crisp Ellert Art Museum at Flagler College invites you to submit works of video art for the annual “Jacket Video Art Showcase”. This is a screening of videos submitted by national and international artists hosted at the CEAM. Organized as a follow up to last years s […]
  • call: International Photography Competition 2016
    Deadline: 17 April 2016 Call for entries International Photography Competition 2016 FLORIDA MUSEUM of PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS is pleased to launch its 6th International Photography Competition. We invite worldwide photographers to take part in the competition. Contest website: http://mulabula.com/splash/fmopa.html Timeline: Beginning of the contest: February 1, 20 […]
  • call: Cinesonika 5 Video Festival
    Deadline: 1 June 2016 Call for entries Cinesonika 5 Video Festival Call For Artworks CINESONIKA showcases international works of film and video with fascinating soundtracks, idiosyncratic sound design, eclectic scoring and innovative approaches to the sound-image relationship. The CINESONIKA 5 festival, conference and workshops will be held Sept 30th-Oct 2nd […]
  • call: Amsterdam Light Festival 2016-2017
    Deadline: 11 March Call for entries Concepts: Amsterdam Light Festival 2016-2017 Amsterdam Light Festival invites you (artists, designers, engineers and architects) to submit ideas for artworks to be staged at the festival’s 2016 – 2017 edition. The fifth edition of the Amsterdam Light Festival will take place in the city center of Amsterdam from end of Nove […]

RSS College Art Association

RSS inside higher ed architecture

  • Assistant/Associate Professor of Nursing
    Bellarmine UniversityLouisville, KYFebruary 12, 2016Bellarmine University has an opening for a 12-month tenure track appointment as Assistant/Associate Professor of Nursing.  The starting date is flexible for this position. Responsibilities may include undergraduate and graduate classroom and clinical/practical teaching with opportunities available for inter […]
  • Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs
    University of Minnesota DuluthDuluth, MNFebruary 12, 2016Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs The University of Minnesota Duluth (UMD) announces a national search for an executive vice chancellor for academic affairs. The executive vice chancellor reports to Chancellor Lendley Black and serves on the chancellor’s leadership team. The new executive […]
  • Director of Undergraduate Nursing
    Montclair State UniversityDiversity ProfileMontclair, NJFebruary 12, 2016The Director of Undergraduate Nursing will manage Montclair State University’s soon to be launched RN-to-BSN Program and play a key role in the development of other undergraduate programs. More... […]
  • CLINICAL ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, General Internal Medicine (9593/B1116)
    Boston UniversityBoston, MAFebruary 12, 2016Maintain clinical responsibilities in the primary care section of General Internal Medicine within the Women’s Health Group, and contribute to the medical student and resident physician teaching program. Specifically, work in Primary Care Clinic, precept residents in their primary care continuity clinics; precept r […]
  • CLINICAL ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, School of Dental Medicine (9592/B1116)
    Boston UniversityBoston, MAFebruary 12, 2016Serve as Clinical Assistant Professor of General Dentistry and provide clinical instruction and supervision to students in the School’s four-year and two year Doctor of Dental Medicine degree program.More... […]
  • SCIENTIFIC PROGRAMMER ANALYST III, IS&T, Scientific Computing (3007/B1116)
    Boston UniversityBoston, MAFebruary 12, 2016Lead the technical aspects of SCV services and service components related to consulting, training, scientific application package support and software development for research computing with a focus on bioinformatics and life sciences. Act as part of the Research Computing team sited at the Boston University Medica […]
  • LAB TECHNICIAN, College of Engineering, Molecular Biology and Genomics (9591/B1116)
    Boston UniversityBoston, MAFebruary 12, 2016OVERALL RESPONSIBILITY   We are seeking a lab technician to assist a molecular genomics laboratory that applies systems and synthetic biology to the study of microbial molecular networks.  The successful applicant will support and perform a range of molecular biology and experiments with a particular focus on high- […]
  • POSTDOCTORAL ASSOCIATE, College of Engineering, Computational Network Modeling (9590/B1116)
    Boston UniversityBoston, MAFebruary 12, 2016OVERALL RESPONSIBILITY   We are seeking a post-doctoral associate to develop computational models of microbial gene regulatory and metabolic networks using advanced statistical modeling and machine learning approaches applied to large-scale genomic datasets.   CHARACTERISTIC DUTIES  More... […]
  • Supervisor (4 positions) - Dining Services (S333)
    Azusa Pacific UniversityAzusa, CAFebruary 12, 2016Azusa Pacific University is a comprehensive, evangelical, Christian university located 26 miles northeast of Los Angeles, California. A leader in the Council for Christian Colleges & Universities, APU is committed to excellence in higher education. Offering over 80 bachelors, masters and doctoral programs […]
  • Assistant or Associate Professor of Computer Science (F508)
    Azusa Pacific UniversityAzusa, CAFebruary 12, 2016Azusa Pacific University is a comprehensive, evangelical, Christian university located 26 miles northeast of Los Angeles, California. A leader in the Council for Christian Colleges & Universities, APU is committed to excellence in higher education. Offering over 80 bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral progra […]

RSS inside higher ed: outside architecture

  • Assistant/Associate Professor of Nursing
    Bellarmine UniversityLouisville, KYFebruary 12, 2016Bellarmine University has an opening for a 12-month tenure track appointment as Assistant/Associate Professor of Nursing.  The starting date is flexible for this position. Responsibilities may include undergraduate and graduate classroom and clinical/practical teaching with opportunities available for inter […]
  • Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs
    University of Minnesota DuluthDuluth, MNFebruary 12, 2016Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs The University of Minnesota Duluth (UMD) announces a national search for an executive vice chancellor for academic affairs. The executive vice chancellor reports to Chancellor Lendley Black and serves on the chancellor’s leadership team. The new executive […]
  • Director of Undergraduate Nursing
    Montclair State UniversityDiversity ProfileMontclair, NJFebruary 12, 2016The Director of Undergraduate Nursing will manage Montclair State University’s soon to be launched RN-to-BSN Program and play a key role in the development of other undergraduate programs. More... […]
  • CLINICAL ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, General Internal Medicine (9593/B1116)
    Boston UniversityBoston, MAFebruary 12, 2016Maintain clinical responsibilities in the primary care section of General Internal Medicine within the Women’s Health Group, and contribute to the medical student and resident physician teaching program. Specifically, work in Primary Care Clinic, precept residents in their primary care continuity clinics; precept r […]
  • CLINICAL ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, School of Dental Medicine (9592/B1116)
    Boston UniversityBoston, MAFebruary 12, 2016Serve as Clinical Assistant Professor of General Dentistry and provide clinical instruction and supervision to students in the School’s four-year and two year Doctor of Dental Medicine degree program.More... […]
  • SCIENTIFIC PROGRAMMER ANALYST III, IS&T, Scientific Computing (3007/B1116)
    Boston UniversityBoston, MAFebruary 12, 2016Lead the technical aspects of SCV services and service components related to consulting, training, scientific application package support and software development for research computing with a focus on bioinformatics and life sciences. Act as part of the Research Computing team sited at the Boston University Medica […]
  • LAB TECHNICIAN, College of Engineering, Molecular Biology and Genomics (9591/B1116)
    Boston UniversityBoston, MAFebruary 12, 2016OVERALL RESPONSIBILITY   We are seeking a lab technician to assist a molecular genomics laboratory that applies systems and synthetic biology to the study of microbial molecular networks.  The successful applicant will support and perform a range of molecular biology and experiments with a particular focus on high- […]
  • POSTDOCTORAL ASSOCIATE, College of Engineering, Computational Network Modeling (9590/B1116)
    Boston UniversityBoston, MAFebruary 12, 2016OVERALL RESPONSIBILITY   We are seeking a post-doctoral associate to develop computational models of microbial gene regulatory and metabolic networks using advanced statistical modeling and machine learning approaches applied to large-scale genomic datasets.   CHARACTERISTIC DUTIES  More... […]
  • Supervisor (4 positions) - Dining Services (S333)
    Azusa Pacific UniversityAzusa, CAFebruary 12, 2016Azusa Pacific University is a comprehensive, evangelical, Christian university located 26 miles northeast of Los Angeles, California. A leader in the Council for Christian Colleges & Universities, APU is committed to excellence in higher education. Offering over 80 bachelors, masters and doctoral programs […]
  • Assistant or Associate Professor of Computer Science (F508)
    Azusa Pacific UniversityAzusa, CAFebruary 12, 2016Azusa Pacific University is a comprehensive, evangelical, Christian university located 26 miles northeast of Los Angeles, California. A leader in the Council for Christian Colleges & Universities, APU is committed to excellence in higher education. Offering over 80 bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral progra […]

RSS digalarti

  • Job - Art lab Manager au Château Éphémère (78)
    Le Château Éphémère de Carrières-sous-Poissy recherche sa/son Art Lab en CDD ou CDI. Date de cloture des candidatures au 25 février.  Consultez l'offre d'emploi ici. […]
  • Mixage Fou, le concours qui repousse les limites de la création sonore
    Mixage Fou en est déjà à sa septième édition ! Porté par une association de professionnels passionnés du son dans tous ses états, il en appelle à la créativité sonore sous des petits formats de 80 secondes, dont la base commune est une banque de sons hautement qualitative. Elle sera en ligne sur le site de Mixage Fou le 18 janvier sur le thème de la voix, la […]
  • Date limite du 10ème Prix International Arte Laguna repoussée
    6 prix à valeur financière de 7000 chacun | Exposition finale à l’Arsenal de Venise | 16 collaborations internationales   La date limite d’inscription a été repoussée à samedi 12 décembre ; inscription par courrier postal ou en ligne sur artelagunaprize.com/fr >> http://www.artelagunaprize.com/fr/reglement   Les artistes inscrits au concours auront la […]
  • VIDEOPHONIC : l'appel à projets 2016-17
    Depuis 2008, l’AADN coordonne VIDEOPHONIC, un dispositif d’accompagnement à la création artistique numérique émergente qui se décline sous la forme d’un cycle de résidences. Vous connaissez sans doute le principe : ce sont des moyens, des espaces et du temps que l’AADN met au service d’une équipe artistique pour lui permettre de travailler sur un projet en c […]
  • Call‬ / Appel à participation ‪‎video‬ - City Light @ Transnumeriques / Mons2015
    Transcultures reherche un vidéaste (de nationalité française) pour réaliser rapidement une video pour le projet de l'institut numediart City Ligth soutenu par Transcultures. Prochaine edition dans le cadre du Festival des Transnumeriques @ Mons2015 tiers décembre 2015. Voir ici édition précédente : http://www.mons2015.eu/fr/city-light Veuillez contactez […]
  • Appel à projet bar éphémère saison 2016/2017 - Saint-Ex Reims
      Lieu atypique de la vie culturelle rémoise, Saint-Ex est un espace d’accueil et d’échange dédié aux pratiques artistiques professionnelles et amateurs qui a pour vocation de participer au développement culturel de la région. En 2014, après plus de 14 ans baigné et nourri des avancées technologiques et de la création numérique, Saint-Ex, lance le label mach […]
  • 10ème Prix Arte Laguna
    OUVERTURE DES INSCRIPTIONS AU 10ème PRIX ARTE LAGUNA Concours artistique international | sujet libre | ouvert à tous Un jury international choisira les 120 finalistes pour: 6 prix en argent de € 7.000 chacun exposition finale à l’Arsenal de Venise 4 expositions dans de galeries d’art internationales 2 collaborations avec des entreprises 7 résidences d’art 3 […]
  • Appel à proposition / APÉRO CODELAB #34 du 10 décembre 2015
    Echelle Inconnue lance un appel à proposition pour la programmation du 34ème apéro Codelab. Candidatures attendues avant le 31 octobre 2015. Il s'agit de comprendre le numérique comme l'eau dans laquelle nous devons aujourd'hui nager, vivre, acter et créer, quitte à en détourner le courant. Vous êtes artistes, développeurs, bidouilleurs, progr […]
  • APPEL A PARTICIPATION : Performance Contest, GTA V "Le jeu vidéo comme matériau artistique"
    APPEL A PARTICIPATION  Performance Contest, GTA V "Le jeu vidéo comme matériau artistique" Dans le cadre de la manifestation Jeux vidéo/art /French Tech, le centre culturel Bellegarde et Clutch magazine invitent les artistes performeurs de tous horizons à jouer une partie de GTA V en public. Il s'agit de détourner le jeu vidéo de sa fonction p […]
  • Saint-Ex recherche son chargé de mission artfabrique (fab lab) / OFFRE D'EMPLOI
    INTITULE DU POSTE Chargé de mission artfabrique DESCRIPTION DE L’ORGANISME Centre culturel numérique Saint-Exupéry Esplanade André Malraux, Chaussée Bocquaine, 51100 REIMS 03.26.77.41.41 infos@saintex-reims.com // www.saintex-reims.com Lieu atypique de la vie culturelle rémoise, le Centre culturel numérique Saint- Exupéry, association loi 1901, est un espace […]

RSS digelarti appel a projet

  • VIDEOPHONIC : l'appel à projets 2016-17
    Depuis 2008, l’AADN coordonne VIDEOPHONIC, un dispositif d’accompagnement à la création artistique numérique émergente qui se décline sous la forme d’un cycle de résidences. Vous connaissez sans doute le principe : ce sont des moyens, des espaces et du temps que l’AADN met au service d’une équipe artistique pour lui permettre de travailler sur un projet en c […]
  • Call‬ / Appel à participation ‪‎video‬ - City Light @ Transnumeriques / Mons2015
    Transcultures reherche un vidéaste (de nationalité française) pour réaliser rapidement une video pour le projet de l'institut numediart City Ligth soutenu par Transcultures. Prochaine edition dans le cadre du Festival des Transnumeriques @ Mons2015 tiers décembre 2015. Voir ici édition précédente : http://www.mons2015.eu/fr/city-light Veuillez contactez […]
  • TRANSIENT FESTIVAL 2015 : SOIRÉE D'APPEL À PARTICIPATION
    [APPEL À PROJETS - CRÉATION NUMÉRIQUE / APPEL À BÉNÉVOLAT / INFO / CONCERTS] Le Transient Festival entame sa saison avec une soirée d’appel à participation ouverte à tous.  Sinchromatic lance un appel à projets destiné à la jeune création art numérique pour sélectionner les œuvres qui seront programmées au Transient Festival 2015. Dans le cadre de cet appel […]
  • APPEL À PROJETS / CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS
      Diagonale s'associe à la Biennale Internationale d'Art Numérique (BIAN Montréal) pour sa troisième édition et lance un appel à projets dont les spécificités lieront le mandat du centre et la thématique 2016 de la biennale: AUTOMATA. Les commissaires et les artistes sont invités à soumettre une proposition jusqu'au 2 juin 2015 à minuit. Le pr […]
  • Appel à projets étudiants // Electroni[k] - Festival Maintenant 2015 - Rennes
    Electroni[k] lance un nouvel appel à projets adressé aux étudiants. Dans le cadre de l’édition 2015 du festival Maintenant qui aura lieu du 9 au 18 octobre, 2 créations d’étudiants seront sélectionnées, produites et présentées : une installation et une performance. Depuis 2001, l’association Electroni[k] explore les croisements entre disciplines, repousse le […]
  • Appel à candidatures pour la résidence Te Ataata offerte à un praticien professionnel français du numérique à Auckland
    L’Ambassade de France en Nouvelle-Zélande et Colab – Auckland University of Technology lancent le premier appel à candidatures pour une résidence de 3 mois au sein de Colab offerte à un praticien professionnel français du numérique. Te Ataata – l’ombre, le reflet, le virtuel en langue maorie – permettra d’accueillir un pensionnaire français en résidence entr […]
  • Appel à contribution : City Lights – Festival VIA 2014 - deadline : 08-03
    Le projet évolutif City Lights (Digital Video Windows), initié par l'insitut numediart et déjà été présenté en avril 2013 lors du 175è anniversaire de la Faculté Polytechnique, vise à créer, sur la façade du bâtiment de l’UMONS, rue de Houdain, un espace de mapping architectural ouvert à la participation citoyenne. Numediart, (Institut de recherche pour […]
  • فͤ҈ͥ҉ͦ҈ͧ҉ͨ҈ͩ҉ͪ҈ͫ҉ͬ҈ͭ҉ͮ҈ͯ҉ͨ҈ͬ҉ͧ҈ͣ҉ͨ҈ͧ҉ͯ҈ͮAppel à projets - Mobile Art(s) & Network(s) Awards 2014 - spamm.be - deadline : 10 mars
    Dans le cadre du festival VIA (le manège.mons) et en partenariat avec la Coupole Numérique (regroupement des opérateurs numériques de la région montoise) initié par Mons2015 Capitale européenne de la Culture, Transcultures, Centre des cultures numériques, propose, avec le soutien de Mons 2015, une introduction à la diversité du Net Art via 3 journées consacr […]
  • Sélection de projets Art Numérique en crowdfunding
    En tant que membre "Mentor" de KissKissBankBank, nous soutenons régulièrement des projets liés à l'art, ou parfois plus largement à la création numérique. Voici les récents projets que nous suivons, n'hésitez pas à leur apporter vorte soutien (en contribuant à leur collecte, ou plus simplement, en les partageant à vos contacts). Et si vou […]
  • [appel] Coordonnateur du Prix des arts médiatiques de l'Alliance des Arts Médiatiques Indépendants
    L'Alliance des arts médiatiques indépendants (AAMI) recherche un Coordinateur de son Prix des arts médiatiques, à Montréal (Québec). Afin d'aider dans les domaines de la communication et du développement et de promouvoir l’Alliance des arts médiatiques indépendants et le secteur des arts médiatiques aux donateurs actuels et potentiels, aux bailleur […]