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Eventide want to change how you think about processing audio

Digital signal processing is some futuristic stuff. It may not be able literally to let you traverse space and time as relative dimensions, but it can treat time and frequency separately and mash them back together. And that’s already freaky enough.

Now, Eventide – the folks you know probably for their classic hardware and reverbs – are pushing that notion right into their marketing, dubbing their approach “structural audio.” Structural audio sounds a bit like a panel presentation you went to at an Audio Engineering Society conference that sounded fascinating but completely lost you and then you went looking for a coffee. (Hey, coffee.) But the basic idea is dividing up a sound for processing into different components, and not just by using a sidechain or a multiband filter.

Here, it’s more radical. The first effect from Eventide to use this approach is called Fission, and it can separate “tonal” (frequency) materials from “transient.”

fission-gui

Now we’re talking. So you could separate the pitched, resonant components of a tom and separate it from the hit, or take fret noise out of a guitar sound, or mangle new sounds entirely.

The key is that you can not only divide up the sound into these bits, but put them back together.

Huh? Well, if that didn’t make sense, check out the video below.

What’s included:

Split (via four separate controls) and separately solo Tonal and Transient components, modify, then reassemble.

Real-time waveform view.

Transient effects: Delay, Tap Delay, Dynamics, Phaser, Reverb, Gate + EQ

Tonal effects: Delay, Compressor, Pitch, Chorus, Reverb, Tremolo, EQ

I’m keen to get my hands on this. Eventide are clearly trying to pitch this to a more traditional studio audience who, you know, want their drums and guitars to sound like drums and guitars. I’m the weirdo who wants strange new things coming out of the food replicator / transporter. So I’ll be curious to play with it.

Synth lovers, though, they do have a nice array of people contributing artist presets who definitely aren’t so vanilla, including Richard Devine (well, of course), Chris Carter, Suzanne Ciani, Joe Chiccarelli, John Agnello, Stewart Lerman, Steve Rosenthal, Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith, Sasha, and Colin Newman.

More:

https://www.eventideaudio.com/products/plugins/structural-effect/fission

macOS 10.7 or later; Windows 7 or later.

AAX, AU, VST, no iLok dongle needed.

US$97 intro price through 17 April. Or $179 thereafter. Also available as part of an Eventide subscription.

Stay tuned for more on this one.

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Komplete Kontrol adds scales and modes, cooler chords, Reaktor Blocks

If you just want a nice MIDI keyboard, frankly, you’ve got loads of options. So Native Instruments’ Komplete Kontrol S-series of keyboards has got to do more. The 1.8 release that came out yesterday takes a step in the right direction, with enhanced scale and mode support and enhanced integration with both Reaktor Blocks and Maschine. And Reaktor Blocks might be the winner here.

Reaktor Blocks. This is almost an afterthought in this release, but to me, it’s the nicest feature so … the heck with it, I’m going to talk about it first. You can now control the clock module in Reaktor Blocks, thus giving you access to start/stop/tempo controls for any clock-based instrument or effect in Reaktor. This is cool, because Reaktor Blocks (and if you graduate to it, all the rest of Reaktor) give you an enormous amount of sonic possibility, but you’ll want some ability to get hands-on control. Now, I think the S-Series becomes a pretty ideal controller – keys, color feedback (which you can custom-program if you’re clever), touch strips, all those encoders, and now clock control, too. So it’s not a huge stretch to imagine first making some massive elaborate trippy electronica/techno patch in Reaktor, then using something like an S-25 to play it live. In fact … don’t mind if I do.

It’s Reaktor, so of course you could use any other controller, too, but having this out-of-the-box set up saves some time for extra patching – and this particular complement of controls I could see fitting a range of circumstances.

This functionality is now workinghas in standalone mode. (But, if you’ve got a ton of Reaktor stuff, that should be fine.)

Reaktor Blocks' hardware modular-inspired tools get a nice hands-on companion.

Reaktor Blocks’ hardware modular-inspired tools get a nice hands-on companion.

Scales and modes now include a wider array of pitch collections mapped to the keyboard, with additional feedback on the colored LEDs above the keyboard. It’s shy of what a lot of us want, though, which is custom scale collections and Scala support for supporting microtunings. But it does make the keyboard more powerful.

The “scales and modes” here are all about mapping individual pitches and chords to the keyboard so there are no “wrong notes.” The tunings stay the same.

And you get a lot of scales – 105 new scales on top of the 15 already there, for a total of 120.

On its own, remapping the usual black-and-white keyboard may not make a whole load of sense – you’ve gone and bought a thing with keys laid out like a piano, so presumably you have some idea how to play that. But because you can combine these with lots of different instruments and Komplete Kontrol’s chord functions, this becomes an interesting compositional tool. And chord mode does make some sense in conjunction with the keyboard’s layout and encoders. And speaking of chords…

ni_komplete-kontrol-1-8_scales-and-chord-feature

Chord voicings. Now you can select inversions and choose your ow voicings for chords. That in conjunction with the enhanced scale options gets really powerful. And it is especially useful I think on the S-25, where you’re trying to get a maximum amount of ideas in a small amount of space.

Maschine users can now run the Maschine transport from the keyboard when loaded as a plug-in, so you can add some keyboard-triggered lines. (In fact, you don’t even need to have your Maschine controller around at all.)

NI have done a video overview, produced by Matt Cellitti:

For more:
www.native-instruments.com/kompletekontrol

Komplete Kontrol 1.8 is a free update in Native Access now.

About those scales

Here’s what you get. Already, you had:

Chromatic, Major, Minor, Harm Min, Maj Pent, Min Pent, Blues, Japanese, Freygish, Gypsy, Flamenco, Altered, Whole Tone, H-W Dim, W-H Dim – plus variations.

“Freygish” may sound funny – that’s Phrygian Dominant.

Now, in addition, you get:

All those Church modes, with some extras. Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian, Locrian, Ionian b2, Dorian b5, Harm Phryg, Phryg Major, Lydian b3, Major Locrian, Minor Locrian, Super Locrian

Jazz modes. Lydian b7, Altered Diminished, Mixo b13, Mixo b9 b13, Lydian b7 b2, Bebop, Whole Tone, Blues Maj, Blues Min, Blues Combined, Lydian #5, Jazz Minor, Half Dim, Augmented

World modes. Think Hungarian, Indian, Jewish, Arabic, Persian, and lots of variations.

Loads of pentatonic variations. All the usual inversions plus some Japanese and Carnatic raga variations.

Modern / composers. The Scriabin scale (ask me about that one, seriously), plus seven choices from Messiaen, and octatonic (useful in jazz), tritone, more.

And Blues scales, major modes, hexatonic scales, and all the various variations of the above.

Seriously, I doubt you’ll want any more custom scales after all this. What you will very possibly want is microtuning – but that you can do specific to instrument, with Reaktor (generally) and instruments like Kontour and Kontakt (specifically) with more options.

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Amazon S3 outage hit SoundCloud, reminds us dangers of centralization

Those of us in music more or less noticed today, “hey, my SoundCloud audio isn’t loading” — while the rest of the Internet went crazy because lots of things were broken. But the reason was Amazon S3, the “cloud” storage service provided by the retail giant.

Early indications appear, though, that SoundCloud’s audio playback and buffering difficulties are the result of degraded performance of Amazon S3 storage.

http://status.soundcloud.com/

See, on the outage in general (still ongoing as I write this, amidst some really confusing messages from Amazon):
Amazon’s AWS S3 cloud storage evaporates: Top websites, Docker stung [The Register]

Now, I use “cloud” storage heavily in my personal work. It’s a backup service, a failsafe data source when on the road. It’s a way of sharing music – as a journalist, as an artist. I use it to save and send critical jobs. Most importantly, I use servers to run CDM, which is a huge part of my livelihood. And it mostly does its job. But then, it’s also important to understand that what “cloud” means. These are physical servers at a physical location with physical connectivity, and they’re operated by humans. That’s a long string of vulnerabilities there, from human error to external attack to forces of nature, even apart from technical problems.

Nerdy web comic xkcd has been there – of course.

the_cloud

If you understand that, you understand that failure is indeed an option. Furthermore, I think you’ll agree there’s vulnerability in centralized, monolithic solutions.

And today, many pundits are reaching the same conclusion.

So, I’m not looking to criticize SoundCloud in particular here. Indeed, a service like that is likely to be more able to recover from trouble than you would on your own, and I don’t know enough about the specific interaction with S3 and SoundCloud today to comment on how they’ve set up their connectivity.

But that said, there is a larger concern about over-centralization and monocultures, even just from the standpoint of ensuring you’ll have access to your own music.

And I’m not the only one adding a red flag here.

In fact, not coincidentally, I quickly am seeing pundits making the same comparison that popped into my head – to Dyn, a DNS provider that took down a ton of the Internet during an attack last year. (That included CDM.)

Here’s Wired:

The “winner takes all” dynamic of the tech industry concentrates more and more power into fewer and fewer companies. That consolidation has implications for competition but also affects the resilience of the internet itself. So many people rely on Gmail that when the service goes down, it’s as if email itself has gone offline, even though countless other email providers exist. Facebook is practically synonymous with the internet for many people all over the world.

The Amazon S3 Outage Is What Happens When One Site Hosts Too Much of the Internet [Wired.com]

(It’s also worth reading Wired’s interview disproving the Internet was built to withstand nuclear strikes. I think I’ve repeated that urban legend. It’s not true.)

That’s a pretty profound statement, though. It suggests that there’s a fundamental problem, but that the dynamics of the industry itself are making the problem worse. (Dyn was a pretty clear-cut case of that, as I can attest. Like a lot of Dyn customers, I had originally used a DNS provider as a way of adding resilience. I didn’t even pick Dyn, though: my provider was bought by Dyn and I was given no choice but to switch to their service – and their pricing, I might add.)

For their part, SoundCloud has been a featured Amazon case study – even though SoundCloud didn’t mention Amazon Web Services (AWS) by name today. (No need; the discussion dominated Twitter if you followed anyone doing Web work.)

AWS Case Study: SoundCloud [Amazon AWS Solutions]

Here’s Alexander Grosse, VP of Engineering at SoundCloud, on that solution:

SoundCloud uses a combination of Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) and Amazon Glacier as its storage solution. The audio files are placed in Amazon S3 and distributed from there via the SoundCloud website. All files are also copied to Amazon Glacier, to ensure that the data is available at all times, even in the event of a disaster. The company currently stores 2.5 PB of data on Amazon Glacier.

Through the combined use of Amazon S3 and Amazon Glacier, SoundCloud is able to securely store data volumes without requiring additional operational overhead. “We don’t need to worry about storage. AWS lets us sleep well at night,” Grosse says.

Now, again, I don’t want to criticize SoundCloud here, or maybe even Amazon. The simple fact of the matter is, Amazon may provide more performance and reliability at the costs SoundCloud requires than would another solution.

But ask yourself this: what about your uptime? Were you impacted by this outage today, and could you recover? (I was – one article was held up, and one work on a release, because each involved music only on SoundCloud that I then couldn’t access.)

This should also make clear that offline storage has got to be a permanent fixture of live performance and DJing. That may sound an obvious statement, but software makers are already trying to imagine a world where music in a DJ set was streamed from the Internet instead of locally.

Ironically, I was working today about an article talking about the dangers of centralization on Facebook. This, of course, interrupted that.

There are cultural and technical issues at work any time our music online is in the hands of just one vendor. You can’t point exclusively at Amazon, because its major rivals in this very business are Google and Microsoft – more big centralized operations by enormous transnational American companies. You can’t just look at SoundCloud, because odds are the SoundCloud alternative you like may also use the same storage provider. You can’t even look at centralization, because centralization for musicians might be what allows their music to be found easily and for people to encounter maximum familiarity and minimum resistance in playing your tracks.

But you can begin to say, we have a potential problem here – and that at the very least, we can’t treat the cloud as something magical that will always be there for us.

So, what do we do?

Well, for one thing, we certainly want the Internet to be less … vulnerable than it is in that IT Crowd sketch. To some system administrators and developers, today, I suspect it felt almost exactly like that.

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Someone at Bitwig is working with Ableton Link on GitHub

One postlude to the Bitwig announcement – yes, someone at Bitwig has forked Ableton Link support. Have a look:

bitwiglink

Thanks to one sharp-eyed Twitter reader for catching this one!

https://github.com/bitwig/link

The reason is interesting – ALSA clock support on Linux, which would make working with Link on that OS more practical.

Now, Ableton has no obligation to support Bitwig as far as integrating Link into the shipping version of Bitwig Studio. Proprietary applications not wanting to release their own code as GPLv2 need a separate license. On the other hand, this Linux note suggests why it could be useful – Bitwig are one of the few end user-friendly developers working on desktop Linux software. (The makers of Renoise and Ardour / Harrison MixBus are a couple of the others; Renoise would be welcome.) But we’ll see if this actually happens.

In the meantime, Bitwig are contributing back support for Linux to the project:

merge

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Dieter Doepfer made the Nintendo Power Glove work for Kraftwerk

German YouTuber “studentsmusic” has come across the Nintendo Power Glove mod used by none other than Eurorack originator Dieter Doepfer. And he had a hell of a client – Kraftwerk.

Now, whether you have any desire whatsoever to don some gloves and wave your hands around, the peculiar category of music glove has a long history intertwined with a lot of today’s thinking about music, controllers, and expression.

Michel Waisvisz gets a brief mention here, but it’s worth noting that his project “The Hands,” originating in 1984, was one of the first gestural controllers and likely shaped many other devices after. I would presume it’s possible someone at Nintendo was even aware of his work. The Power Glove, for its part, came later – 1989-1990. And certainly from that point on I suspect you can credit Waisvisz and the Amsterdam research center STEIM for suggesting that waving your hands around could be used for music.

In addition to custom-engineered solutions, since Nintendo’s debut musicians have been hacking gaming solutions, too. (Actually early in CDM’s life I was compiling these – as in this set of 2005 links to accompany something I wrote for Computer Music. Ooh, but that’s weird for me to read. Moving on.)

Anyway, Dieter’s creation is really quite clever – and it’s worth watching the video here.

Now, Nintendo is about to release another set of gestural controllers in the form of Switch. Even if you aren’t into gaming, the Nintendo launch game for that hardware is full of ideas. The Verge claim this is sophisticated technology, but my bet is the actual hardware is pretty simple and this is just smart, finely-tuned code.

Note the use of the mic for control, for instance – that’s something you can use.

So I don’t think any of these ideas are exhausted yet. But it does mean it’s time again to do this:

God, that music is so good. Or it’s so bad. (It’s J. Peter Robinson, who while perhaps not a household name is the sound of countless 80s movies and a ridiculous amount of pop arrangement.) And yes, that really is Jenny Lewis. I… digress.

via Resident Advisor

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Bitwig Studio 2 is here, and it’s full of modulators and gadgets

Go go gadget DAW. That’s the feeling of Bitwig Studio 2, which is packed with new devices, a new approach to modulation, and hardware integration.

Just a few of these on their own might not really be news, but Bitwig has a lot of them. Put them together, and you’ve got a whole lot of potential machinery to inspire your next musical idea, in the box, with hardware, or with some combination.

And much as I love playing live and improvising with my hands, it’s also nice to have some clever machinery that gets you out of your usual habits – the harmonies that tend to fall under your fingers, the lame rhythms (okay, that’s me I’m talking now) that you’re able to play on pads.

Bitwig 2 is full of machinery. It’s not the complete modular environment we might still be dreaming of, but it’s a box full of very powerful, simple toys which can be combined into much more complex stuff, especially once you add hardware to it.

A few features have made it into the final Bitwig Studio 2 that weren’t made public when it first was announced a few weeks ago.

That includes some new devices (Dual Pan!), MIDI Song Select (useful for triggering patterns and songs on external hardware like drum machines), and controller API additions.

The controller API is a dream if you’ve come from (cough) a particular rival tool. Now you can code in Python, but with interactive feedback, and performance – already quite nice – has been improved.

I’m just going to paste the whole list of what’s new, because this particular update is best understood as a “whole big bag of new things”:

NEW FEATURES AND UPDATES

A re-conceptualized Modulation System
Numerous device updates, including dynamic displays and spectrum analyzers
Remote controls
Fades and crossfades
VST3 support
Better hardware integration
Smart tool switching
Improved editor workflow
MIDI timecode support
New menu system
Dashboard
Notification system
Adjustable track height in arranger
Controller API improvements
…and much more

25 ALL NEW MODULATORS

4-Stage
ADSR
AHDSR
Audio Sidechain
Beat LFO
Button
Buttons
Classic LFO
Envelope Follower
Expressions
HW CV In
Keytrack
LFO
Macro-4
Macro
Math
MIDI
Mix
Note Sidechain
Random
Select-4
Steps
Vector-4
Vector-8
XY

17 ENTIRELY NEW DEVICES
Audio FX

Spectrum analyzer
Pitch shifter
Treemonster
Phaser
Dual Pan

Hardware Integration Devices

MIDI CC
MIDI Program Change
MIDI Song Select
HW Clock Out
HW CV Instrument
HW CV Out

Note Effects

Multi-Note
Note Echo
Note Harmonizer
Note Latch
Note Length
Note Velocity

At some point, we imagined what we might get from Bitwig – beneath that Ableton-style arrangement and clip view and devices – was a bare-bones circuit-building modular, something with which you could build anything from scratch. And sure enough, Bitwig were clear that every function we saw in the software was created behind the scenes in just such an environment.

But Bitwig haven’t yet opened up those tools to the general public, even as they use them in their own development workflow. But the new set of modulation tools added to version 2 shouldn’t be dismissed – indeed, it could appeal to a wider audience.

Instead of a breadboard and wires and soldering iron, in other words, imagine Bitwig have given us a box of LEGO. These are higher-level, friendlier, simple building blocks that can nonetheless be combined into an array of shapes.

To see what that might look like, we can see what people in the Bitwig community are doing with it. Take producer Polarity, who’s building a free set of presets. That free download already sounds interesting, but maybe just as much is the way inw which he’s going about it. Via Facebook:

The modulation approach I think is best connected to Propellerhead Reason – even though Reason has its own UI paradigm (with virtual patch cords) and very distinct set of devices. But while I wouldn’t directly compare Reason and Bitwig Studio, I think what each can offer is the ability to create deeply customized performance and production environments with simple tools – Reason’s behaving a bit more like hardware, and Bitwig’s being firmly rooted in software.

There’s also a lot of stuff in Bitwig Studio in the way of modernization that’s sorely missing from other DAWs, and notably Ableton Live. These have accumulated in a series of releases – minor on their own, but starting to paint a picture of some of what other tools should have. Just a few I’d like to see elsewhere:

  • Plug-in sandboxing for standard formats that doesn’t bring down the whole DAW.
  • Extensive touch support (relevant to a lot of new Windows hardware)
  • Support for expressive MIDI control and high-resolution, expressive automation, including devices like the ROLI hardware and Linnstrument (MPE).
  • An open controller API – one that anyone can use, and that allows hardware control to be extended easily.
  • The ability to open multiple files at once (yeah, kind of silly we have to even say that – and it’s not just Ableton with this limitation).
  • All that, and you can install Bitwig on Linux, too, as well as take advantage of what are now some pretty great Windows tablets and devices like the Surface line.

    There’s also the sense that Bitwig’s engineering is in order, whereas more ‘legacy’ tools suffer from unpredictable stability or long load times. That stuff is just happiness killing when you’re making music, and it matters.

    So, in that regard, I hope Bitwig Studio 2 gets the attention of some of its rivals.

    But at the same time, Bitwig is taking on a character on its own. And that’s important, too, because one tool is never going to work for everyone.

    Find out more:

    https://www.bitwig.com/en/bitwig-studio/bitwig-studio-2

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    Modstep iPad sequencer is now packed with drum kits, MIDI templates

    There are apps, and then there are apps with a studio soul. Modstep feels like it uniquely qualifies as the latter. If you’ve just got your iPad, it’s built with lots of interoperability with other apps in mind. And then combine it with hardware, and out of the box, it makes all that outboard gear more useful.

    What does it do, and what it’s about? I could try to explain, but really six-year-old Maja does a much better job. (That’s how she won the Modstep video production contest.) She loves her 909 and her 303 and enjoys this more than playing games. The stickers thing is really smart, too – top tip. Digital native for the win.

    So Modstep 1.2 is a point release for this US$19.99 app, but what it adds is a lot more of what was there.

    When it comes to software interoperability, you get support for presets in Audio Unit v3 — letting you save presets for software instruments and the like, with supported apps. There’s also Audiobus 3 compatibility.

    You also get a whole bunch of new Sample Kits. They’re a beautiful way to get started, and they’re also a reminder of how useful sampling is in Modstep. These cover not only the expected drum kit territory, but also a mess of “tonal” kits based on synth samples. Since you can mangle and modify these and put them in loads of different contexts, that naturally could lead to a lot of new musical ideas. The developers provided CDM with a list:

    New drumkits:

    ElAnRy1
    ElAnRy2
    MBase Kicks
    MFB 522
    MFB TM
    TR-09

    New Tonal Kits:
    404 Acid
    404 Deep Bass
    404 Noise
    CS Chord
    Dirty Triode
    MS20 Brazz
    MS20High
    MS20 Lobass
    MS20 Noisquare
    MS20 Squaring
    MS20 Tuna
    SEM Square
    SyncBass
    TB 03 Acid 1
    TB 03 Acid 2
    TB 03 Bass
    TB 03 Bass 2
    TB 03 Rev
    Triode Blops
    Triode Skreamer
    Triode Subsaw
    Vlc Keys 5th
    Vlc Keys URI
    Wurl

    Okay, so that covers your soundware. But what if you like hardware? Well, there are a bunch of new hardware templates baked into the app, too – on top of the generous selection already included.

    What this means is, without digging out a MIDI spec somewhere, you can pull up a preset by name and instantly automate it – no futzing with MIDI CC numbers required. And our very own MeeBlip is included, meaning now every generation of MeeBlip has full support. (Just sayin’ – yeah, I’m a bit biased!)

    Template support:

    Roland TR-09
    Roland TB-03
    OTO BIM
    OTO BAM
    Modal CRAFTsynth
    MeeBlip triode
    Korg monologue
    Elektron Analog Heat

    There are loads of fixes and workflow improvements, too, in particular improving Auto Save functionality. The only bad news (for some of you with older iPads, anyway): you now need iOS 8 or later.

    Launch video, in case you liked what I just said and sort of what the important bits of it flying at your screen:

    A gallery, showing instrument integration and saves:

    modstep

    17093260_10213085477878155_1511106979_o

    17036706_10213085478678175_2130612374_o

    17035745_10213085479278190_864729065_o

    Go get it:

    http://modstep.net/

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    Now you can sync up live visuals with Ableton Link

    Ableton Link has already proven itself as a way of syncing up Ableton Live, mobile apps (iOS), and various desktop apps (Reason, Traktor, Maschine, and more), in various combinations. Now, we’re seeing support for live visuals and VJing, too. Three major Mac apps have added native Ableton Link support for jamming in the last couple of weeks: CoGe, VDMX, and a new app called Mixvibes. Each of those is somewhat modular in fashion, too.

    Oh, and since the whole point of Ableton Link is adding synchronization over wireless networks or wired networking connections with any number of people jamming, you might use both apps together.

    CoGe

    Here’s a look at CoGe’s Ableton Link support, which shows both how easy configuration is, and how this can be used musically. In this case, the video clip is stretching to the bar — making CoGe’s video clips roughly analogous to Ableton Live’s audio clips and patterns:

    CoGe is 126.48€, covering two computers – so you could sync up two instances of CoGe to separate projectors, for instance, using Link. (And as per usual, you might not necessarily even use Ableton Live at all – it might be multiple visual machines, or Reason, or an app, or whatever.)

    http://imimot.com/cogevj/

    VDMX

    VDMX is perhaps an even bigger deal, just in terms of its significant market share in the VJ world, at least in my experience. This means this whole thing is about to hit prime time in visuals the way it has in music.

    VDMX has loads of stuff that is relevant to clock, including LFOs and sequencers. See this screen shot for some of that:

    vidvox_ableton

    Here are the developer’s thoughts from late last week:

    VDMX and Ableton Link integration [Vidvox Blog]

    Also, they reflect on the value of open source in this project (the desktop SDK is available on GitHub). They’ve got a complete statement on how open source contributions have helped them make better software:

    Open Source At VIDVOX

    That could easily be a subject of a separate story on CDM, but open source in visuals have helped make live performance-ready video (Vidvox’s own open Hap), made inter-app visuals a reality (Syphon), and has built a shader format that allows high-performance GPU code to be shared between software.

    Mixvibes

    I actually forgot to include this one – I’m working o a separate article on it. Mixvibes is a new app for mixing video and audio samples in sync. It was just introduced for Mac this month, and with sync in mind, included Ableton Link support right out of the gate. (That actually means it beat the other two apps here to market with Link support for visuals.) It runs in VST and AU – where host clock means Link isn’t strictly necessary – but also runs in a standalone mode with Link support.

    This is well worth a look, in that it stakes out a unique place in the market, which I’ll do as a separate test.

    http://www.mixvibes.com/remixvideo

    Now go jam

    So that’s two great Mac tools. There’s nothing I can share publicly yet, but I’ve heard other visual software developers tell me they plan to implement Ableton Link, too. That adds to the tool’s momentum as a de facto standard.

    Now, getting together visuals and music is easier, as is having jam sessions with multiple visual artists. You can easily tightly clock video clips or generative visuals in these tools to song position in supported music software, too.

    I remember attending various music and visual jams in New York years ago; those could easily have benefited from this. It’ll be interesting to see what people do.

    Watch CDM for the latest news on other visual software; I expect we’ll have more to share fairly soon.

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    Dispersion makes it crazy easy to get that bouncing ball delay sound

    You know the sound. Bah bah bahb bh bh bhbhbbbbdddd… And you’ve heard in … some track. Somewhere. Okay, you know, words really aren’t the greatest thing for describing particular audio effects. So just listen:

    The “bouncing ball” delay is just one of the sounds available in Dispersion, a new thirty-dollar audio effect plug-in for the Mac. You get organic sounding delays that are all synced together to match a groove. That gives you tight choruses and stereo widening, nice crunchy-grainy delays, and other shuffles and diffusion and, you know, delay sounds. It’s an especially nice combination of very useful delays, in a compact package.

    Because this is Sinevibes, you can also assume a Mac-centric design sensibility and brightly-colored, simple, visual interface and animations – whether you have a lower-res display or nice new Retina screen.

    But don’t let that simplicity fool you. You can program up to 16 delay lines, all with this special “time spread” formula, plus damping at the low and high end, variable feedback (gradual or stepped), and modulation.

    Good stuff. My go-to delay these days has become Replika XT from Native Instruments, just because it has just about every delay mode I can imagine – but this has its own unique sound and might break me out of Replika a bit! Congrats to Artemiy Pavlov for another instant classic. Check it out:

    http://www.sinevib.es/dispersion/

    dispersion

    The post Dispersion makes it crazy easy to get that bouncing ball delay sound appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

    Watch a talk explain perfectly why humans make music with technology

    Why do you make music? You make music because you feel something – and you found it because you felt something.

    And what’s the point of music technology? It’s to put us in that space, to give us access to those feelings, and then to translate them to others.

    That’s the message in a TEDx video from Perth, Australia, by stellar electronic one-human performer Claudio. And she puts it perfectly, in a way that perhaps people who love music but haven’t become full-time musicians can fully understand. So she walks through her performance rig – if you’re reading this site, you know all about that part. But she also puts perfectly what the essence of all of this is. Quote:

    It’s technology, and technology is fickle …

    But it’s the price that I’m willing to pay for this feeling as close to the source as electronically, technologically, humanly possible right now, for as little as possible to be lost in the conversion. For the essence of who we are to not be lost in translation.

    Thanks to King Britt for sharing this. King for his part recently debuted an intense and emotional performance of his own, relating to police abuse and violence, and always reminds me of the importance of being true to your deepest feelings.

    Claudio onstage, keytarrin'. Photo: Rod Maurice, via Claudio's Facebook.

    Claudio onstage, keytarrin’. Photo: Rod Maurice, via Claudio’s Facebook.

    Claudio is Rachel Claudio, now based in Paris, France. She played with King at Ableton’s first Loop event.

    Catch her latest music:

    (Ha, great tagline – “Frustrated ninja. Buttons & knobs.”)

    She’s perhaps best known for covering Sia – check out her terrific, tight performance (which also made a big splash on French national television, with far more views than this YouTube vid):

    Meet her in this bio, covering her journey from Australia to France. In French:

    Or in English:

    Follow her on social:

    @rachelclaudio on Twitter

    Facebook

    Claudio in the studio. via her Facebook

    Claudio in the studio. via her Facebook

    The post Watch a talk explain perfectly why humans make music with technology appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

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