machine quotidienne

Icon

Why KORG Gadget on the Mac is a big deal

Remember when some pundits thought we were all going to dump our laptops and switch to tablets and iPads? So – not so much. But mobile platforms are having a big impact on music software – and KORG Gadget, now making the leap from iOS to Mac, may be most emblematic of that.

Who is KORG Gadget for? Well, sort of for everyone. Beginning users can find it a nice way to play around – and might well try this before desktop software. More advanced users are likely to find it an appealing set of tools, but would want to use it to extend other hardware and software – on the go, or integrated with those tools when they’re at home or in the studio ready to work.

If you haven’t tried it and you’ve got an iPad (or iPhone, even), Gadget is great – fun to play, lots of tools, and lots of great sounds. KORG also have nailed the smart approach of adding modules in a way that’s fun, so that adding additional instruments feels a bit like getting a new cartridge for your Game Boy or adding a stomp box to your pedalboard.

Gadget started on these Apple things.

Gadget started on these Apple things.

Now, adding Mac support fills in some gaps – especially because of how KORG has gone about it. This looks like a template for what software development in 2017 should be:

Social. Allihoopa is just emerging as a way of sharing music with other producers, but KORG are embracing it. (The sharing site began its life with Propellerhead before being spun off. So naturally Reason, Figure, and Take all have integration – and KORG Gadget, too.) That seems essential, given the signal-to-noise problems sharing music online.

Synced. Ableton Link support, also quickly becoming a must, means you can sync with Ableton Live, Reason, Maschine, and other apps on desktop, plus loads of apps on iOS – so, easy local sync on your computer between software tools, easy sync between computers, easy sync with mobile, whether you’re playing alone or jamming with other people.

Wireless. There’s Bluetooth MIDI support, too. For new users, this means the possibility of using hardware without thinking about wires and MIDI adapters.

It makes sense on your computer screen. Full-screen apps are a bit silly on the more generous screen real estate on your desktop, so KORG have opted for a four-app split-screen approach that makes loads of sense.

Complete plug-in support, when you want it. AU (for Logic and GarageBand), AAX (for Pro Tools), and VST (for everything else) are all supported. There’s even NKS support, which lets you integrate with Native Instruments hardware and software easily. (For instance, you’ll get physical controls on NI’s Maschine hardware and keyboards.) The upshot of this: all those clever independent instruments and effects from the iPad are now just as modular on the desktop, dropped into whatever your software of choice is.

On the go and back again. The whole point of this, of course, is the ability to complete workflows between desktop and mobile seamlessly. And that’s where a lot of conventional software from Native Instruments, Ableton, Propellerhead, and others are a little uneven (partly because they began their life on desktop). Here, you have essentially the same tools in both places.

Gadget on the Mac also brings some new devices – a 16-pad drum machine, and two new audio recording tools.

But there are two paths here – the beginner and the more advanced user. Beginners may find this a way to start to take steps from mobile to desktop tools (and hardware). Advanced users may come from the opposite direction – trying Gadget with or without an iPad, and integrating on-the-go or casual use with sitting down seriously at a computer and finishing a track.

This gets us out of a cul-de-sac in music making software that we’ve been stuck in for a few years. Desktop software has always tended to be more complex and larger, with fairly monolithic tools that try to appeal to everyone, but then tend to turn off newcomers. Mobile software may seem like a way out of that, except that the low price points users demand on the app stores make it hard to justify development costs. Innovation on both tends to be stymied by those same problems.

So, imagine instead that you combine the benefits of both.

KORG Gadget is then just one small step. And it’s also limited to Apple platforms – just as Windows gets a bunch of interesting hardware. But it could be a nice sign of things to come.

We’ll be watching closely to see how KORG prices Gadget on the Mac versus mobile, what the experience is like on desktop (since we’re judging only by iOS), and who embraces it.

But it’s very nice to see an option like this that looks friendly to beginners, without forcing advanced users to give up their way of working. We’ll be eager to test it.

Also, lest it seem like I’m waxing poetic about Gadget for no reason — I’m very much indebted to other people who have spent loads of time working out how to get the most out of it and making great music. Our friend Jakob Haq has done some nineteen videos so far for Gadget alone, and it’s chock full of tips and musical inspiration.

Have a look – as these videos might be relevant to you for the first time if you’re on the Mac but don’t have an iPad:

http://www.korg.com/us/products/software/korg_gadget/

The post Why KORG Gadget on the Mac is a big deal appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Now your Nord can sound like the very first Steinway, No. 1

The instrument was crafted, literally, in a kitchen in 1836 in Seesen, near Hannover. But it defined piano history. It’s pianoforte “Steinway No. 1,” built by Steinway founder Heinrich Engelhard Steinweg. And now its sound is inside more modern electronic keyboards, from Swedish builder Clavia.

Clavia aren’t unveiling any new gear this week, but they do have two interesting new sound libraries. One is “Steinway No. 1.” There’s been a lot of effort between the original instrument and Herr Steinweg’s kitchen and you. Expert builder Chris Meane of Belgium got an exclusive authorization from the Steinway company to recreate the historical instrument, with 2000 hours of work and x-rays and photos and digital sketches and the help of a specimen from the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and more. That story is itself fascinating even if you don’t care about Nord.

If you do have a Nord, though, you can take advantage of a specialized sound library sampling the recreating instrument. (That’ll be a fairly sophisticated sample of a sample of a piano, in other words.)

dummyhead

Equally cool, Clavia are also releasing what they call the Royal Grand 3D, a binaural dummy head recording of a grand. That should give you the feeling of sitting at the piano, which I think will make this particularly nice for anyone using a Nord for practice.

Fun fact: “dummy head” is also how I would best describe my piano sightreading skills.

The news:

http://www.nordkeyboards.com/about-us/press/namm-news-2017

Sounds:

(There are sound samples of the Steinway, too, on their site, though those appear not to be available yet on SoundCloud.)

The post Now your Nord can sound like the very first Steinway, No. 1 appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

The demise of Keyboard Magazine, after 42 years

Keyboard Magazine will cease to exist as a publication, after having been continuously published since 1975. And this isn’t just another “print is dead” footnote. Keyboard was the publication that defined commercial writing about electronic musical instruments. And whatever the logic behind the decision, the demise of Keyboard says something about the state of both publishing and electronic music production – and its absence will be felt.

Keyboard will be rolled into Electronic Musician, with only the EM name surviving. Gino Robair will continue as editor-in-chief of EM.

This is truly the end of an era – an era Keyboard itself began.

Originally, electronic musical instruments were the domain of electronics publications for hobbyists and similar enthusiast magazines. That’s how Bob Moog’s Theremin design came to appear in 1954 in something dubbed Radio and Television News. Keyboard wasn’t the first dedicated publication to cover the field of electronic musical instruments. The first publication of some significance was Electronic Music Review, a somewhat informal and wonky quarterly begun in the late 60s right in the R.A. Moog plant itself. That publication hosted articles by the likes of Stockhausen and Berio alongside Carlos and Moog – a reminder of how experimental early synthesizer use tended to be.

It’s almost hard to remember in the Internet-saturated age just how different the world in which the synthesizer came into being was. Academia had access to the cutting edge; hobbyist publications covered simple circuits. But there was nowhere for bleeding edge technology to come together with popular musical practice; nowhere where musicians and tech might easily overlap.

This is how Electronic Music Review announced its intentions back in 1967. (Source.)

This is how Electronic Music Review announced its intentions back in 1967. (Source.)

So just as it mattered that Moog eventually shipped the Minimoog with a keyboard, it was ground-breaking that Keyboard was, from the start, a commercial endeavor with widespread appeal. This was the first publication to go into real circulation, the first with glossy ads.

Minimoog, as seen in the September '79 issue. Just the Moog ad archive alone is something to see - and it's basically all from Keyboard/Contemporary Keyboard.

Minimoog, as seen in the September ’79 issue. Just the Moog ad archive alone is something to see – and it’s basically all from Keyboard/Contemporary Keyboard.

Oh yeah – the ads. Advertising isn’t something people outside of publishing tend to talk about, except when they’re annoyed. But do an image search online for vintage synths, and spot how many of the advertisements you’ll find are from Keyboard. Some of these are, quite frankly, beautiful. There are futuristic images of luscious keyboards floating in space; full-page and double-page spreads.

Keyboard was defined by advertising. It covered the expanded full-time staff, and made a platform where rock stars wanted to be featured. It filled the pages between articles with lust-inducing electronics shots. As much as people talk ad blockers and complain about editorial independence, how many of you reading this spent time pouring over every page of Keyboard – every editorial word, every ad, alike? This is the lifeblood that allowed Keyboard to rise above a simple manufacturer-made hobbyist publication with a few hundred readers, like the wondrous but obscure Electronic Music Review. And it was the lifeblood that virtually everyone who ever worked on the publication imagined would someday run out – and mean the end of the publication.

(What you now know as Electronic Musician had a similarly humble origin story to EMR – as Polyphony, published by PAiA Electronics. That’s why Keyboard, not EM, gets the credit in synthesizer history for originating the mainstream publication as a genre.)

I mention ads because I think only those who have worked in publishing know just how much this is an industry that’s about keeping the lights on and the business rolling. It’s a struggle. It’s doubly so in print, because print requires the outlay of capital to print the publication. And advertising payments in print don’t happen immediately, either – meaning the whole business endeavor begins with a significant cash flow challenge.

In print, you can add to that challenge corporate consolidation – both the distribution apparatus that gets publications into people’s hands (as at the newsstand at your airport), and the companies that publish the magazines.

I trust Gino Robair of all people to continue the heritage of Keyboard in EM. At the same time, it’s worth reflecting on the loss of a publication with a particular angle. That angle was right in the name – what was first awkwardly titled in 1975 Contemporary Keyboard.

keyboardcover

Keyboard was a magazine for keyboardists. The publication always had some challenges in popular tastes in that regard – the keyboard as an instrument tends to come in and out of bands. But in losing Keyboard, you risk losing everything that went with it – including those articles about keyboard technique and excerpts of sheet music.

And I think that’s significant in and of itself. The economics of music gear publishing tend to pull us away from technique generally, and from musical instrumental technique in particular. If we aren’t careful, the gear may push the artist right off the cover; “how to sound like…” takes place of how to play.

Keyboard was most awkward because of this mission, perhaps, but also most meaningful. Wendy Carlos could talk composition; Herbie Hancock could talk about playing. I wrote an obituary once for Andrew Hill.

The future of the keyboard, of course, is now as uncertain as that of Keyboard. And I know some people have eloquent arguments for why synthesizers shouldn’t necessarily be chained to keyboards as input devices – or, by extension, to musical genres that prefer those keyboards. But if you forget about the keys and think about the human hands that touch them, Keyboard at its best was about what those hands were doing, too.

There’s actually too much of Keyboard over these decades for this to be a proper obituary. For that, I’d turn to colleagues who spent a lot more time than I did at the publication.

What I will say is that CDM, and my career, likely wouldn’t exist without Keyboard. In addition to Chris Breen at Macworld, Ernie Rideout at Keyboard gave me my start and got me hooked on writing in this field. Stephen Fortner continued to be a great partner to work with on some tremendous stories, including the cover story that marked the Minimoog’s 40th anniversary. I got to know Jim Aikin, a veteran of Keyboard back to the 70s, who was the toughest and most important editor I ever had. Somehow, Jim put up with me through the 600-page Real World Digital Audio and saved it. (Now, bizarrely, people are reading it in its Polish translation – so Jim, you’ve helped with that, too, unwittingly.) And Francis Preve, who has been a particular inspiration to me and early on honed in on the modern state of electronic production for the publication, I met thanks to the magazine, too.

That’s my own history. Synthesizer history is also tied up in this publication, one in which Kate Bush was a cover, Wendy Carlos was a voice, and Bob Moog had a byline.

These fragile projects bring people together, in ways that are nearly impossible to predict or even describe. And yes, often someone out there is reading, and that leads people places too.

So, now things are changing. And to think that positive change is easy and inevitable, or indeed that change is ultimately positive, is incredibly naive.

Whether it’s Gino at EM, or any of our colleagues, or me, all of us in music technology face some real challenges and rapid changes. Audiences, technology, and the business of publishing are all changing at tremendous speed, and all present major uncertainties looking forward.

We have to navigate those waters in order to keep telling stories about music.

And I think it’s very important that we not lose what Keyboard has represented. We need connections to musical practice and technique. We need, I believe, keyboard players. And we should even think about the power of those ads over the years, because commercial publications are, for all their flaws, what enable writers to follow their passion and readers to hear their words.

Through that weird alchemy of revenue and editorial, we have to find some way to make sure we can share stories of how humans and technology come together to make music.

Keyboard may be gone. But I hope what it accomplished can continue in new places.

Any Keyboard writers and editors wanting to help make a history, I’d love to chat. The good thing about the Internet is, content can exist separately from time – and some things can seem to live, if only in illusory fashion, forever.

A side note / plug — one slice of history I got to edit is Keyboard Magazine presents the Evolution of Electronic Dance Music. In it, you’ll see that Keyboard could prove its independence from advertisers – there’s an extended discussion of the early bugs in the MPC. And you’ll watch as music evolves alongside the magazine. But that’s only one tiny microcosm.

The post The demise of Keyboard Magazine, after 42 years appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Send MIDI messages faster than ever, right from the command line

Quick! Send a MIDI control change message! Or some obscure parameter!

Well, sometimes typing something is the easiest way to do things. And that’s why Geert Bevin’s new, free and open source tool SendMIDI is invaluable. Sorry to nerd out completely here, but I suspect this is going to be way more relevant to my daily life than anything coming out of NAMM this week.

In this case, whether you know much about how to use a command line or not, there’s almost certainly no faster way of performing basic MIDI tasks. Anyone working with hardware is certain to want one. (Someone I suspect will make their own little standalone MIDI tool by connecting a Raspberry Pi to a little keyboard and carry it around like a MIDI terminal.)

The commands are simple and obvious and easy to remember once you try them. Installation is dead-simple. Every OS is supported – build it yourself, install with Homebrew on macOS, or – the easiest method – grab a pre-built binary for Windows, Mac, or Linux.

And now with version 1.0.5, the whole thing is eminently usable and supports more or less the entire MIDI spec, minus MIDI Time Code (which you wouldn’t want to send this way anyway).

So, now troubleshooting, sending obscure parameter changes, and other controls is simpler than ever. It’s a must for hardware lovers.

Developers, that support for all operating systems is also evidence of how easy the brilliant open source C++ JUCE framework makes building. The ProJucer tool does all the magic. “But wait, I thought JUCE was for making ugly non-native GUIs,” I’m sure some people are saying. No, actually, that’s wrong on two counts. One, JUCE doesn’t necessarily have anything to do with GUIs; it’s a full-featured multimedia framework focused on music, and this tool shows your end result might not have a GUI at all. Two, if you’ve seen an ugly UI, that’s the developer’s fault, not JUCE’s – and very often you’ve seen beautiful GUIs built in JUCE, but as a result didn’t know that’s how they were built.

But anyone should grab this, seriously.

https://github.com/gbevin/SendMIDI

The post Send MIDI messages faster than ever, right from the command line appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Bitwig Studio 2 lets you modulate and control like a bandit

Bitwig gets its first blockbuster upgrade since launch, in beta now. And the first look at this software suggests it’s continuing to deliver what an enthusiast audience wants – even if some of the revolutionary promise of the tool remains over the horizon.

So, first, what it isn’t: it isn’t a complete modular environment. Underneath all the goodies Bitwig offers is a set of modules that provide its functionality. Bitwig’s developers have said eventually they’ll open that up to users, not just for their own development. And that’s be exciting indeed.

But forget about big ambitions for a moment. The step that we get here looks really useful.

In fact, it might be friendlier to everyday users than the grand-modular-everything scheme.

modulator_zoo_6c

What’s cool about Bitwig is its consistency. I think Ableton has actually suffered as its included devices have fragmented. There are third-party tools that never get updated. There are truly native tools like Simpler – and those are great. Then there are features relegated to second-class citizens as Max for Live devices, which sometimes cause them to behave differently or load more slowly. There are different sets of tools for monitoring signal or looking at frequencies, and they aren’t available everywhere. Lots of functions aren’t modular. MIDI assignment is clunky. I could go on. Adding Max for Live seems to have become an excuse for not fundamentally improving any of this – at least through what’s now several years of updates. And, apologies, Ableton, but I think in this case you deserve the comparison.

Bitwig’s first versions laid a foundation for something more consistent and integrated. But we had to wait for them to deliver a product that built from that competition past the competition.

And modulators really look like they could be it. Every internal device, and every plug-in, now has an unlimited number of modulator slots.

So add an LFO if you want. Add some math or randomization. There are envelopes and step sequencers and keytrackers and nifty X/Y controllers. Plug those in, change whatever you want. Do it anywhere.

These are also all polyphonic. That combined with the cool control provided by devices like ROLI’s I think could open up a new approach to sound design.

I won’t mince words: you can stop reading here, because I think modulators are a reason to give Bitwig a go.

bitwig2

This semi-modular capability is much of the time probably more appealing for quickly coming up with ideas than a full-modular environment would be. On the other hand, if this works, it can and should increase appetite for more modular tools – if I could just change that step sequencer a little…

But I really think this illustrates the limitations of Max for Live, or running other environments as plug-ins. Being able to modulate in devices while you arrange, inside a DAW, natively, is a whole other experience. I can’t wait to try it, and I’ll be writing once I get some time with the beta.

Check them out here.

https://www.bitwig.com/en/bitwig-studio/bitwig-studio-2/modulators.html

Hardware integration is the other functionality I think is really important, and really in tune with how many people want to work now. Again, it’s nice to see Bitwig add these features natively.

For MIDI, you get devices for both hardware and plug-ins:
Control Change (CC)
Program Change

And hardware devices:
Clock Out
MIDI timecode (MTC)

Plus, there are Control Voltage devices, for gate, continuous control, and simple direct signals:
CV Instrument
CV Out

You also get a bunch of MIDI/pattern devices – nothing so radical to users of other DAWs, like Cubase, but I think doubly welcome in the context of the other hardware features and rich modulation:

Multi-note (think chords)
Note harmonizer
Note length
Note echo
Note latch
Note velocity

Add those together with modulation, and many of you probably don’t need a full modular tool.

Remote Controls for any device take the best feature of Live’s Racks – macro mapping – and appear to make it more coherent. Whereas those are device-specific and require setting up a rack, Bitwig’s feature can be saved with presets, too, and are available everywhere. They also go well with the hardware integration features above.

The other reason I’m going to give this a second go is, frankly, fades/crossfades – which look elegant and nicely work not only in the arrangement view but in clips and audio editor, too.

6c-fades-crossfades

Like any maturing DAW, the rest of this is a sort of grab bag of lots of improvements to workflow – the various refinements that occur in parallel to multiple elements of the tool.

So you get a spectrum analyzer, and spectral tools through the internal toolset. There’s an expanded Polysynth, with expanded timbral tools like oscillator mix and filter waveshaping modes – and it combines with those new modulators. There’s VST3 support – a rarity outside Cubase.

If that didn’t excite you, zoom in on this shot of the Polysynth. The new visual language, the friendliness of the UI, the richness of modulation – this looks like promising stuff for synth lovers.

polysynth

They’ve also significantly streamlined editing workflows and how tools, menus, and windows are integrated.

I expect some people will be disappointed that the revolution hasn’t arrived. And it means there’s a battle for Bitwig. The DAW market is crowded. Just being good – sometimes even being better – has never been enough.

But I think we may finally get a chance to really take advantage of the modular engine beneath Bitwig. And since a lot of us have tracks we want to make, the availability of modulators and the nice suite of arrangement and control tools here mean something you can use right now, today.

We’ll have more to say once we do our review. Happy modulating.

https://www.bitwig.com/en/bitwig-studio/bitwig-studio-2.html

The post Bitwig Studio 2 lets you modulate and control like a bandit appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Musical resolutions – hand-picked music to start 2017

Just as mixes need transitions, humans need pauses. So while some of the divisions of time are arbitrary, we need moments to step back and recollect. So CDM asked a cross-selection of producers and DJs to choose music from 2016 to begin our year. Maybe now – as the vacation spirit is wearing off and task lists are looming – maybe now is the time we need those most.

This particular group of humans generally resisted the idea of making charts, as an empty exercise. But I suppose some of those individuals are the very people whose music selections I value most – because they actually reflect on this a bit and choose something meaningful. So, arm twisting where necessary, we got this. Several colleagues included moments of reflection spent over the new year’s holiday looking back across the whole year. Some even did their digging while preparing for New Year’s gigs.

Anyone who says they’ve got the “best” music of the year is probably out of touch with just how much music the planet is making. But here, we have an honest selection of music that moved people. And we get to meet some of the people making those picks. I hope you enjoy.

alan_oldham_by_marie_staggat_24sw

Alan Oldham

Alan Oldham to me is the embodiment of electronic music futurism as it has radiated from Detroit. Apart from being an exceptional DJ and producer (as DJ T-1000), he’s also a leading comic book artist and one of the most desirable people anywhere to design your record sleeve. This is someone who can illustrate electronic fantasies in sound or image. So his picks are a wonderful place to start.

From Silence – Delano Smith [Sushitech]

Vision (Marcel Dettmann Remix) – Radio Slave [Rekids]

Distorter (Housemeister Remix) – DJ T-1000 [AYCB]

The World Through My Eyes Dub Versions – Jason Fernandes [Subfigure]

Dying Planet/Container – Zzino & Guss Carver

Landing XX – Ellen Allien [BPitch Control]

Illuminati Child EP – Alan Oldham

Social Housing – Marquis Hawkes [Marquis Hawkes]

These Are The Voyages – Detroitrocketscience [Detroitrocketscience]

I Woke Up And The Storm Was Over – Tropic of Cancer [Blackest Ever Black]

Social Housing by Marquis Hawkes

dashaplaying

Dasha Rush

Dasha needs little introduction – the Russian native, Berlin-based producer and DJ does a bit of everything, from experimental to techno. She helms the beautifully unique Fullpanda, is brilliant in live electronic performance across genre, and has made appearances on the likes of raster-noton.

And I think Dasha came up with my favorite response to these. She chose just one track – one favorite from the past two years. And she said she doesn’t like the forced exercise of selecting charts and numbering them, or DJs charting their own music – all of which I appreciate. (Though in this case I specifically said to DJs, I was happy to see their own tracks in there, too – because I chose producers I love.)

But here’s her one track – and this one selection says a lot, and is worth some time. (The label is a favorite round here at CDM, Nordanvind Records.)

Korridor – “Somnolence”

noncompliant_shiva

Noncompliant

Noncompliant (also known as DJ Shiva or Lisa Ess) is a powerhouse of midwest techno and a talent whose moment has come. 2016 was a prelude to what is yet to come, I think, with a Berlin debut and devastating new techno cuts. So apart from a deep insight into politics and unending oasis of empathy, Lisa is your go-to cat when you want grimy, powerful techno.

It’s also worth highlighting some of the picks here. The lose of Cherushii aka Chelsea Faith was not only personally devastating to many, but heart breaking because her music represented some of the richest possibility in the scene now. How that continues will be a topic to come.

Run The Length Of Your Wildness V. 1 by Cherushii

Corpora by Adam Jay

Bas Amro – Imposter Persona [Wolfskuil]

LA4A – Dialup [Delft]

Alex Falk – Blazeit [CGI]

Adam Jay – Corpora LP [DetUnd]

Cherushii – The Industrial City [Run The Length of Your Wildness]

Savile – Share Power [Argot]

Tin Man, Jozef K & Winter Son – Fates Unknown (Erika Remix) [Acid Test]

Jimmy Edgar & Truncate – Submission [Ultramajic]

Fango – Vena Cava [Degustibus]

Avalon Emerson – Narcissus in Retrograde EP [Ghostly]

zeno_performing

Zeno van den Broek

I was fortunate to get to seek out Zeno for our new Establishment imprint, because I already knew and loved his music tastes. So drawing on his own rich experimental background and creative taste, here are some more experimental selections for our list. We’ll be talking more to Zeno this week about his own work, too. But of course, I’m especially fond of the Grischa Lichtenberger music here – see our recent interview.

Shifted – Flatlands [Hospital Productions]

Yannis Kyriakides – Gut Thoughts [Unsounds]

Lorenzo Senni – Rave Voyeur [Warp]

Grisha Lichtenberger – 003_0415_03_re_0112_re_0811_08_lv_1 [raster-noton]
Yves de Mey – Adamance [Spectrum Spools]

Codespira1 – Node #1 [Moving Furniture]

Microseq – Fragments of Here

[Epilepsy warning – but otherwise, this video is amazing]

Esther Dune at Berlin's Gegen party.

Esther Dune at Berlin’s Gegen party.

Esther Duijn

Bridging the Amsterdam and Berlin scenes and a regular ring-leader of some of the better appearances literally underground at Tresor, Esther is an unsung techno champion. And like the others here, she’s got a long battle history in labels, production, and DJing. I actually insisted that she select some of her own label and production efforts for that reason – you don’t want to miss them. And it starts with this beautiful, weird track by Jimmy Asquith, the man behind Lobster Theremin records.

You’re probably going to want a record player in order to acquire a lot of this, FYI. Esther’s meticulous personality also means she’s the only one who gave us catalog numbers.

The New World by Tom Hang

Tom Hang – The New World EP (A1 The New World) [Where to Now? WTN49]

Plural / Hakim Murphy – Split EP (B2 Hakim Murphy – Tbanger) [Another Earth AE202]

Versalife – Selfreplication (A2 Scepsis) [Trust Trust027]

Heavenchord / Stan Soul / EA110 – Coba (A1 Heavenchord – Journey into the subconscious) [Tevol TEVOL001]

Worker Parasite – Druid (A2 Druid) [Electric Pressure ELP001V]

214 – North Cascades (A1 Miami Nights) [Frustrated Funk]

Various Artists – Real Wild Trax (B2 Vin Sol – Down for Mine) [Club Lonely CL003]

33.10.3402 – Untitled (B1 33.10.3402 – Ne Declina A (121 Roland MC 303)) [LIES LIES074]

Myles Serge / Duijn & Douglas – Split EP (A1 Myles Serge -The art of shadow thoughts) [Another Earth AE101]

John Heckle – Tribute to a Sun God (B1 Mesopotamia) [Bedouin Records BDN010]

Esther, as I lack a meticulous personality, I’m not totally certain this is the right L.I.E.S. cut, but … it’s also too nice to share if not.

Meanwhile, here’s one of hers – delicious:

And quite fond of this whole John Heckle record:

John Heckle – Tributes To A Sun God by Bedouin Records

phase-fatale-roma-rampa

Phase Fatale

Hayden Payne, New York-to-Berlin transplant (a phrase associated with NYC now much like “world champion New York Yankees) is one of the brightest up and coming techno acts. His now-regular sets at Berghain are deliciously gothic and adventurous. And I think his taste are a beautiful hype-free window into what’s happening in the international electronic scene, what’s driving the queues at these clubs beyond just hype, and what is genuinely fresh and enjoyable and new. And sure enough, he delivered a lovely reminder of some favorites of mine, ones I’m sure will appeal here.

Sawf – “High Zone” [Kafta Kafta001]
Ascetic – “Atheism” [Manic Depression Records]
Orphx – “Zero Hour” [Sonic Groove / Hands – see our interview]
November Novelet – “Ursa Minor” [Galakthorrö]
Alvar – “Diffuse Tomorrow” [Alvaret Tape Recordings]
Sarin – “Control” [A+W IX]
Schwefelgelb – “So Heisser Es Wird” [Fleisch 001]
Pure Ground – “Before Us” [Avant! ?– AV!043]
Unhuman – “Unterstüzung” [Amok Tapes AMOK008]
Source Direct – “The Crane (Function/Inland Remix)”

kyoka2016_1_photo_sylviasteinhaeuser

Kyoka

Apart from liking Grischa’s latest as much as apparently the rest of us do, Kyoka is a person whose live sets and music consistently come up when chatting with the others here. The second raster-noton inclusion on this list apart from Dasha, I added Kyoka because of her intelligence and enthusiasm. So, we’ll get some repetition, but I think well-deserved – these are tracks a lot of us couldn’t stop listening to last year, and may still look forward to savoring this year.

004_241 B – Grischa Lichtenberger

Bound State – Ueno Masaaki

Dark Barker – kangding ray

Twistet In the Wind – Frank Bretschneider

a1_entrance_m_v2 – Eomac

Cause to emit sound – DJ SODEYAMA

Just Face It – DJ Git Hyper

anastasia

Anastasia Kristensen

From Moscow to Europe, Anastasia has emerged as a brilliant connector – she’s someone who manages to seem to be everywhere, know everyone, but then apply that social intelligence to greater musical depth. And I asked her here because her sets and mixes are diverse and not just cookie-cutter creations. (Electric Deluxe agree – see the latest episode of their terrific podcast.

She’s bringing that diversity back to her home base Copenhagen, where she somehow finds time to equally balance prolific DJing with exceptional productions. While I chose not to contribute a chart to this story, there’s no question one of my entries would have been BLD’s remix EP with Eric Cloutier, Stojche, and Anastasia – and her cut is a favorite. See also “Spring Ballade” on Nous Disques.

yen towers – bid II, posh isolation
ctrls – the wave, token
air max’97 – thrall, decisions
dreams – headhunter, nous disques
rx 101 – 101 reasons, saction
jamaica suk – Depth Between Waves, L.A.G.
melly – skip fire, where to now?
rommek – solvent, blueprint records
ken ishii – extra (7th plain remix), a-ton
imaski – hyperloop, (Establishment)

Photo: Michael Breyer.

Photo: Michael Breyer.

Electric Indigo

Susanne Kirchmyer just played a brutal set at about blank his weekend. To those in the know, she’s simply a legend – a foundation of the European scene. She’s also been active in transforming the face of the scene to come, through her work with Female Pressure.

Now, like Dasha, Susanne straddles experimental and techno, AV performance and dancefloor in her own work. Unlike Dasha, Susanne’s rebellion to “name five to ten tracks” was to go with more instead of less. But that reflects her collections, too, so let’s have at all of it!

10 chosen most significant:
Born In Flamez x Modeselektor – TBF [XLR8]
Perc – Ma [Stroboscopic Artefacts 026]
Monolake – Error (VLSI Version) [Imbalance Computer Music ML-032]
B12 – Core Meltdown [FireScope 003]
Rrose – Emboli [Khemia 002]
Adriana Lopez – En Ningun Lugar [Modularz 25]
Headless Horseman – Under The Earth [the29nov 001]
Annie Hall – Hyssop [Subspec 035]
Sky Deep – Woman & The Gun feat. Hevî [female-pressure – Music- Awareness & Solidarity w- Rojava Revolution]
Annie Hall – Herschel [CPU 00011100]

Other tracks that I wanted to be in the top 10:
Orphx – Blood in the Streets [Sonic Groove LP02]
Alhek – The Voice Of Cement Buildings [Mechanical Thoughts LP01]
Antigone & Francois X – Ready To Escape [DEMENT3D 012]
Scalameriya – Ambidextrous [Genesa 006V]
Angelina Yershova – Immersion [Twin Paradox 003]
Silent Harbour – Dock Operations [Transcendent LP001]
Shlømo – The Ritual [Wolfskuil LTD 029]
Kero / Gotshell – Samaria District [Blueprint 047]

More tracks that I really like:
Simo Cell – Away From Keyboard [Livity Sound 021]
Shifted – Clairvoyance Part II [Drifting Over 001]
Dimi Angélis – Dwarf Planets [Construct Re-Form 012]
Insolate – Renew [Out of Place 002]
Trinity – Orchard [Coincidence 074]
DJ Red – Sweet Silence [Electric Deluxe 047]
Klaudia Gawlas – Obsession [Credo 038]
Etapp Kyle – Ahora [Ostgut Unterton 08]

Actually, 2016 was a very good year listening to the music I collected ????

ambivalent

Ambivalent

Kevin McHugh, aka Ambivalent, but impressing lately as techno act LA4A, is our consummate tasteful last entry here. I appreciate that Kevin actually said he enjoyed picking these for this task. And he’s worth quoting here, because I feel some of his music was the most underrated of the year – even though it was also widely selected by our group of contributors as some of our favorite.

Morphology – Vector Plant – DUM
Physical Therapy – 909 Reasons Why – Delft
Amotik – Terah – Amotik
Avalon Emerson – Glider Gun – Valence
Emmanuel – Masa – Enemy
Vernon Felicity – Defender – Delft
TAFKAMP – I Laf You – Paling Trax
Ambivalent – Whyou (Michael Mayer Remix) – Kompakt
Camea – Signs (Andre Kronert) -Neverwhere
Truncate – Wave 1 – Truncate

Now, this is my kind of New Year’s Resolution. Because listening to all of this makes me want to go discover more and make more music. Unlike those forgotten new year’s gym memberships, this is fitness that is addictive.

And I hope we’ll visit these friends here more throughout the year. That’s a resolution to keep.

The post Musical resolutions – hand-picked music to start 2017 appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Sennheiser wants to bring 3D audio recording to the masses

The consumer electronic drive to high definition and virtual reality is having a curious, parallel impact on sound. And so it is that Sennheiser now want to market binaural recording to your average smartphone owner – really.

Now, of course, the normal human perception of reality includes both visual depth perception and the ability to localize sound in a 360-degree sphere around the head. That is, provided only one’s eyes and ears are fully functional and each pair is intact, the human brain adapts to these perceptions.

But “3D” visuals and “3D” sounds aren’t themselves directly connected in terms of technology. Firstly, until we begin connecting directly to the human brain, any of the tech billed as 3D is illusory, aimed only at creating sensations that remind us of our normal perception. (And, remarkably, for years even two-dimensional images and monophonic sound sources do a pretty reasonable job!)

From a marketing standpoint, though, the connection is more real than ever.

And what I think may be exciting to music and audio enthusiasts is that this means specialist technology we’ve loved for years is suddenly becoming mainstream.

ambeo-smart-surround_3

Sennheiser’s AMBEO isn’t itself revolutionary, apart from the fact that it’s marketed to the masses. It’s a binaural microphone recording system that adds mics to conventional in-ear headphones. The personal nature of audio here offers an advantage: because you recorded with your own skull wearing the headphones, you’ll be able to play back the same recording with what I imagine is a sensation of “being there” again. That is, the mics were in your own head, so the sound will seem to you to be natural.

In a sign of how audio makers may try to use the VR hype, Sennheiser are also marketing a high-end Ambeo 3D VR microphone.

It’s a totally different technology – it’s basically an ambisonic mic, with “four matched KE 14 capsules in a tetrahedral arrangement.” (Richard Devine has one. Of course he does.) But Sennheiser is not only adding some VR buzzwords here. They’re also partnering with content producers, so that the mic’s engineering and use were built in collaboration with the people who need accurate spatial information recorded as part of their workflow. See:

Ambeo VR mic

(1800€ isn’t so much to ask given what you might make in producing VR these days – and the work this could save.)

I’ll try to get hands-on with this hardware soon.

Here's the high-end solution - ambisonic rather than binaural. Four capsules combine to get realistically-spatialize sound for use in VR and 3D content.

Here’s the high-end solution – ambisonic rather than binaural. Four capsules combine to get realistically-spatialize sound for use in VR and 3D content.

Sennheiser makes a really weird claim in the press release – they say that they contributed to the first wave of binaural audio by introducing the first open-ear headphones. Uh – no. But that said, I think Sennheiser are the ideal brand to introduce this tech to the listening public, especially with their combined prowess in mics and headphones and their ability to produce both leading pro and leading consumer solutions.

ambeo-smart-surround_remote

There is an element missing here. So, these binaural recordings will sound really three-dimensional – to you. But give them to someone else, and because they’re essentially listening to a recording made with your skull, the results won’t be as effective. What’s cool about the AMBEO line, though, is it’s the first step. The next step, I think, will be self-calibration routines in software.

And we’re practically there already. Remember that 3D scanning app Microsoft showed lately? If you can take produce a three-dimensional model with your phone, you can adjust sound playback for each listener’s heads.

It’s going to look a little weird doing the calibration routine, in that you’ll be waving your phone around your head, magician style. But you would only do that once for each listener – and there’s no special hardware to wear, either. (Take that, VR helmets.)

This is also the latest evidence in why the move to digital headphones and away from headphone jacks isn’t necessarily such a bad thing.

That said, the connector is an issue. Whereas Android vendors are using a standard USB-C port, Apple continue to insist on Lightning. To add insult to injury, they’ve missed the opportunity to add their own proprietary port to their own line of laptops – I think there’s absolutely no rational explanation for why the new MacBook Pro standardizes on USB-C but lacks Lightning, unless Apple are planning to themselves dump Lightning for USB-C.

ambeo-smart-surround

But let’s not get too hung up on that. The long view is still a positive one.

And it involves not one but two transformations. Not only do you start recording and playing back sound in a way that’s more naturally spatialized than stereo, but you open new possibilities by adding dedicated microphones to headphones.

We’re entering an age that could really change how people listen and record sound. There are applications for deep listening, field recordings, sound walks, for acoustic ecology and sound sensing, for fitness applications that are mindful of exposure to sound and potential hearing damage. Oh, yeah, and … I for one welcome all the mad amounts of bootlegging that will invariably occur. But maybe that’s because I always flake and don’t record my sets.

Mark my words: even if this specific Sennheiser product flops, this stuff is the future. And it’s been a long time coming.

Capture your world in 3D

The post Sennheiser wants to bring 3D audio recording to the masses appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Sony’s gestural projector could change interaction

Last week’s CES trade show was full of weird and unlikely inventions. But some of them point at directions in tech that could bear fruit. Take this Sony Xperia Projector prototype. The consumer benefits aren’t immediately clear – but media artists may see the perfect self-contained interactive installation.

The Verge gets a hands-on with the device:

Basically, it’s three technologies in one. It’s a pico projector, and those may continue to improve as LED tech scales. It’s an Android mobile gadget – and unlike iOS, Android has the benefit of being to run on any device imaginable as a general purpose embedded solution.

And it’s an interactive gestural … uh … thing. It’s hard to know what to call it, actually. Multi-touch isn’t the right word, because you don’t actually touch anything.

Indeed, it’s a reminder of the potential of infrared sensing. Years ago, my very first interactive / creative coding experience was with Flash and simple Sharp IR range sensors – as this was the tech of choice long before the debut of things like Kinect. And while infrared requires line of sight (as seen in the video), it’s pretty predictable.

Put them together, though, and you get a projector that lets you run and interact with apps anywhere. In fat, it’d be perfect for installations, except that it isn’t as easy as it should be to lock down Android into presentation mode. (Cough.)

I can also imagine some creative music apps.

But I have to differ with the reviewer here. I’d love one of these round the house or in a backpack. And even if the Sony device here doesn’t make it to market, it’d be possible to whip up a similar combination of technology as DIY solution.

Seen anything else interesting in creative technology at CES? Give us a shout. We’re always up for off-center thinking.

The post Sony’s gestural projector could change interaction appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

The passing of Marvin Yagoda (1938 – 2017)

Marvin Yagoda, founder of Marvin’s Marvelous Mechanical Museum in Farmington Hills, Michigan has passed away at the age of 78. He was known to say that he would try to make the world better one smile at a time. He did just that and the museum of coin-operated amusements he created will continue to do it for years to come.

The video above features Marvin serving as subjectmatter expert on the show American Pickers.

Here is a nice article about Marvin Yagoda from The Detroit News.


Raindrops inspire mesmerizing video by Max Cooper, Maxime Causeret

It’s good to be Max Cooper. The artist’s richly crafted sound designs are paired now with a series of music videos commissioned by motion designers. And the most mesmerizing of these is the stunning creation by Maxime Causeret.

Driven by the organic sounds of recorded rain, spun into percussion, Causeret’s animations follow emergent systems of colored particles as they merge and swim across the screen.

I could say more, but … Max sort of says it all. Here:

I’m really excited about this video project, after the first live show it was the part that everyone was asking about – It is a beautiful humanised exploration of life and emergence, by Maxime Causeret. I hope you enjoy it as much as I do!
The idea for this part of the story started on a day when there was really heavy rain hitting the roof window at my old flat. I got out my binaural mics and put my head right up by the window with the big raindrops hitting all around. They made nice individual percussive noises, with great spatial positioning, so I decided to use them to seed a piece of music.
This track is the most explicit representation of the idea of emergence in the album, because the rhythm of the track is created by the raindrops in an emergent manner – I took the audio samples, mapped the transients for the raindrop hits, and then forced the mapped points towards the nearest drumming grid positions. This meant that the random raindrops were pushed into a quantised grid, and the result was that a percussive rhythm emerged, one that I hadn’t created myself, but was the closest rhythm to that particular section of rain.
I then played the sansula over this rain rhythm, and added lots of pads and saturation layers, finally with some vocal snippets from Kathrin deBoer to complete the track. Maxime Causeret selected this track to work with, under the brief to map the emergent rhythm to an exploration of emergence in living form.
His video shows the raindrops initially, then going into simple cellular forms and then showing the important idea of cooperation between simple cells to form more robust colonies of life. This develops into a visualisation of the idea of endosymbiosis, where simpler smaller organisms can live inside larger cells, each providing a benefit to the other, and eventually forming parts of the same organism as they evolve to be entirely dependent on each other. The video also shows competition between organisms for resources, which spurs on their evolutionary development, as each species tries to keep up with the innovations of the others. He also visualises the emergent ideas of flocking behaviour, where groups of individuals form beautiful dancing-like patterns.
Maxime also shows us a section of animated reaction-diffusion patterns, where simple chemical feedback mechanisms can yield complex flowing bands of colour – these forms of system were originally thought up by Alan Turing, and were part of the early seeds of the field of systems biology, which seeks to simulate life with computers, in order to better understand the systems producing the complexity we see in the living world. They were also the starting point of my main research area many years ago before I got lost in music! (where I began with the question of what patterns could be produced via reaction-diffusion forms of system as opposed to gene-regulatory network controlled patterning).
So it’s a rich visual treat from Maxime on many levels, I can see why so many people were asking about it after the first live show. Lots more amazing video content to come over the next few weeks.
Some words from Maxime about his process (translated from French):
Max wrote a brief text on each song to let us know his own feeling and we were free to make our own creation. I firstly made a lot of small experiments with dynamic systems around my main idea of living micro organism. It was now time to experiment with editing. I also ask for opinions, ideas and tests of few friends, specially Leslie Murard.
I firstly made a lot of small experiments with dynamic systems around my main idea of living micro organism. It was hard to then put everything together. It was now time to experiment with editing. I also ask for opinions, ideas and tests of few friends, specially Leslie Murard. Then i just have to do the real shots from my experiments.
In terms of tools, I work with Houdini. It’s a software which gives you a lot of freedom. You can easily customize tools or build your own tools. It’s famous for vfx but you have the same freedom with modelling or animation tools for cheap when you’re a freelance.
I always start with few sketches on paper for ideas. I also search for références drawings/photos/painting. In Houdini i try to setup something fast to Cook or at least fast to preview in order to animate the shots in good conditions.
The major challenge was to put everything together. There’s nothing very hard but it’s never easy to get something who “works” so it needed time to adjust things. This production was made this summer on 4 months but not at full time. I also had few other projects.
You can listen to the full album here: MaxCooper.lnk.to/Emergence
Subscribe for more here: MaxCooper.lnk.to/Subscribe
And more stuff at:
maxcooper.net
facebook.com/maxcoopermax
twitter.com/maxcoopermax
soundcloud.com/max-cooper
Maxime’s pages:
teresuac.fr/
vimeo.com/user5429327

I think it’s one of the most compelling soundscapes we’ve heard from Max yet — and those links will send you down lovely trails of more inspiring visuals and sound. Enjoy!

The post Raindrops inspire mesmerizing video by Max Cooper, Maxime Causeret appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

RSS akimbo

  • An error has occurred, which probably means the feed is down. Try again later.

RSS medialab prado

  • An error has occurred, which probably means the feed is down. Try again later.

RSS College Art Association

RSS inside higher ed architecture

RSS inside higher ed: outside architecture

RSS digalarti

  • Appel à projets : Résidence Hiver 2017
    Le Lab d’Eastern Bloc est un lieu pour expérimenter, apprendre, théoriser et créer ; un espace pour faire avancer les pratiques hybrides, génératives, mises en réseau et systémiques, le tout guidé par le discours de l'artiste.  Le Lab est un site de convergence pour les artistes (établis et émergents), les professionnels, les étudiants, les techniciens, […]
  • APPEL AUX ARTISTES POUR L’11ème PRIX ARTE LAGUNA - Inscription prolongée au 14.12.2016
    Distinction artistique internationale | sujet libre | concours ouvert à tous Inscription prolongée au 14 Décembre 2016   Le Prix Arte Laguna est un concours international à sujet libre qui vise à patronner l’art contemporain. Le concours se profile au niveau global par la variété croissante de partenariats et d’opportunités offerts aux artistes et est consid […]
  • APPEL AUX ARTISTES POUR L’11ème PRIX ARTE LAGUNA
    Distinction artistique internationale | sujet libre | concours ouvert à tous Le Prix Arte Laguna est un concours international à sujet libre qui vise à patronner l’art contemporain. Le concours se profile au niveau global par la variété croissante de partenariats et d’opportunités offerts aux artistes et est considéré un vrai tremplin de carrière artistique. […]
  • Appel/Call – Laboratoire de veille arts-numeriques.info WatchLab / #artnumerique #mediaart
    Dans le cadre du laboratoire de veille arts-numeriques.info, Transcultures lance un appel à collaborations à destination d’un artiste/développeur afin de repenser le projet et développer une série d’outils destinés à pérenniser le réseau et toucher un public plus large. Le personne sélectionnée travaillera en étroite collaboration avec Jacques Urbanska, l’in […]
  • Recherche Stagiaires Production & Communication - juin à décembre 2016 - Transcultures
    Transcultures recherche à partir de juin 2016, un(e) stagiaire désireux(-se) de se former en production/organisation et un(e) stagiaire désireux(-se) de se former en communication dans les milieux de la culture, des arts numériques et des cultures sonores. Transcultures est un centre interdisciplinaire des cultures numériques et sonores, pionnier des pratiqu […]
  • ENCAC 2nd open call / 2e appel pour les artistes audiovisuels
      Deuxième appel à projets d’ENCAC pour les artistes audiovisuels et les développeurs ENCAC (European Network for Contemporary Audiovisual Creation) propose six résidences de recherche et/ou de production dans cinq lieux du réseau ENCAC est heureux d'annoncer un appel à projets pour six résidences qui auront lieu de novembre 2016 à mai 2017 au sein des […]
  • Appel à projets + résidence MAP Transcultures – Pépinières européennes pour jeunes artistes 2016
      Dans le cadre du programme MAP (mis en œuvre par les Pépinières européennes pour jeunes artistes), Transcultures, Centre interdisciplinaire pour les cultures numériques et sonores, associé avec la Ville de Mons (Belgique) et avec le soutien du Ministère de la Culture de la Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles, lance un appel à résidence de création de 3 mois pour […]
  • Appel à projets/résidence arts numériques – SCAM<>Mundaneum<>Transcultures 2016
      Appel pour une résidence artistique et le développement d’un projet de création multimédia à partir des archives du Mundaneum Le présent appel à projet s’inscrit dans un partenariat entre la Scam, le Mundaneum (dont les archives personnelles des fondateurs Paul Otlet et Henri La Fontaine, sont désormais dans le domaine public), et Transcultures (Centre des […]
  • APPEL À PROJETS INTERNATIONAL – Arts & Technologies – Maintenant 2016
    L’association Electroni[k] lance un appel à projets international pour la prochaine édition du festival Maintenant qui aura lieu en octobre 2016 à Rennes.   Proposez un projet innovant au croisement des arts et des nouvelles technologies, pour vivre des expériences poétiques et insolites !   Mots-clés : Croisement artistique, interaction, projet immersif, in […]
  • Appel de propositions Klondike
    Klondike, décor sonore pour patinoire 2016 Appel de propositions s’adressant aux artistes canadiens-nes Avatar, centre de production et de diffusion en art audio et électronique, lance un appel de propositions pour le projet Klondike, décor sonore pour patinoire. Klondike est un projet d’art sonore initié par Mélanie Bédard et Ariane Plante en 2012. Né de le […]

RSS digelarti appel a projet

  • Centaure: performance audiovisuelle de Franck Vigroux & Kurt d'Haeseleer
    A l'occasion du cycle de rencontres intitulé "Les Rendez-vous de Némo", qui auront lieu toutes les 6 semaines environ jusqu'à la prochaine biennale (octobre 17), une performance de Franck Vigroux et Kurt d'Haeseleer, "Centaure", clôturera cette première rencontre qui se tiendra  le 28 juin prochain à la grande halle de la V […]
  • Appel à projets + résidence MAP Transcultures – Pépinières européennes pour jeunes artistes 2016
      Dans le cadre du programme MAP (mis en œuvre par les Pépinières européennes pour jeunes artistes), Transcultures, Centre interdisciplinaire pour les cultures numériques et sonores, associé avec la Ville de Mons (Belgique) et avec le soutien du Ministère de la Culture de la Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles, lance un appel à résidence de création de 3 mois pour […]
  • Appel à projets/résidence arts numériques – SCAM<>Mundaneum<>Transcultures 2016
      Appel pour une résidence artistique et le développement d’un projet de création multimédia à partir des archives du Mundaneum Le présent appel à projet s’inscrit dans un partenariat entre la Scam, le Mundaneum (dont les archives personnelles des fondateurs Paul Otlet et Henri La Fontaine, sont désormais dans le domaine public), et Transcultures (Centre des […]
  • Appel à projets enseignement supérieur "Arts & Technologies" // Festival Maintenant 2016
    Crédits photos : Barnabé © Joséphine Herbelin / Spirodraw © Romain Coulon   Créez un projet innovant au croisement des arts et des technologies ! L’association Electroni[k] lance un appel à projets aux étudiants pour l’édition 2016 du festival Maintenant qui aura lieu en octobre 2016 à Rennes, pour la création d’une installation et d’une performance autour d […]
  • VIDEOPHONIC : l'appel à projets 2016-17
    Depuis 2008, l’AADN coordonne VIDEOPHONIC, un dispositif d’accompagnement à la création artistique numérique émergente qui se décline sous la forme d’un cycle de résidences. Vous connaissez sans doute le principe : ce sont des moyens, des espaces et du temps que l’AADN met au service d’une équipe artistique pour lui permettre de travailler sur un projet en c […]
  • Call‬ / Appel à participation ‪‎video‬ - City Light @ Transnumeriques / Mons2015
    Transcultures reherche un vidéaste (de nationalité française) pour réaliser rapidement une video pour le projet de l'institut numediart City Ligth soutenu par Transcultures. Prochaine edition dans le cadre du Festival des Transnumeriques @ Mons2015 tiers décembre 2015. Voir ici édition précédente : http://www.mons2015.eu/fr/city-light Veuillez contactez […]
  • TRANSIENT FESTIVAL 2015 : SOIRÉE D'APPEL À PARTICIPATION
    [APPEL À PROJETS - CRÉATION NUMÉRIQUE / APPEL À BÉNÉVOLAT / INFO / CONCERTS] Le Transient Festival entame sa saison avec une soirée d’appel à participation ouverte à tous.  Sinchromatic lance un appel à projets destiné à la jeune création art numérique pour sélectionner les œuvres qui seront programmées au Transient Festival 2015. Dans le cadre de cet appel […]
  • APPEL À PROJETS / CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS
      Diagonale s'associe à la Biennale Internationale d'Art Numérique (BIAN Montréal) pour sa troisième édition et lance un appel à projets dont les spécificités lieront le mandat du centre et la thématique 2016 de la biennale: AUTOMATA. Les commissaires et les artistes sont invités à soumettre une proposition jusqu'au 2 juin 2015 à minuit. Le pr […]
  • Appel à projets étudiants // Electroni[k] - Festival Maintenant 2015 - Rennes
    Electroni[k] lance un nouvel appel à projets adressé aux étudiants. Dans le cadre de l’édition 2015 du festival Maintenant qui aura lieu du 9 au 18 octobre, 2 créations d’étudiants seront sélectionnées, produites et présentées : une installation et une performance. Depuis 2001, l’association Electroni[k] explore les croisements entre disciplines, repousse le […]
  • Appel à candidatures pour la résidence Te Ataata offerte à un praticien professionnel français du numérique à Auckland
    L’Ambassade de France en Nouvelle-Zélande et Colab – Auckland University of Technology lancent le premier appel à candidatures pour une résidence de 3 mois au sein de Colab offerte à un praticien professionnel français du numérique. Te Ataata – l’ombre, le reflet, le virtuel en langue maorie – permettra d’accueillir un pensionnaire français en résidence entr […]