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These mics capture sounds from the edge of human hearing – and beyond

usimic

Here’s how much Slovak label LOM loves field recordings and strange sounds: they didn’t just stop with releasing a few wild experimental ambient albums. They’ve gotten into the boutique mic business. They’re creating new hardware that lovingly captures electro-magnetic fields. They’re printing t-shirts with custom designs to show their passion in illustrated form.

These are people who are really passionate about recording.

And you can get bit by the same addiction. Let’s have a look at what they’re offering.

electrosluch

Perhaps the most interesting offering from Bratislava’s LOM is the Elektrosluch, the electro-magnetic “instrument” from LOM artist and label brain Jonáš Gruska. Now, you’re familiar with interference from electro-magnetic fields – it’s the reason your bandmates get cross with you if you don’t switch your iPhone into flight mode when you start recording. But what if a device didn’t just capture those sounds: what if it were engineered for maximum precision as if they were desirable?

Well, this is what happens thanks to that mentality:

I got a chance to play with the latest model in Brno at the Bastl Instruments-hosted synth fest, and it’s extraordinary – more so than YouTube can really capture. You really feel privy to an invisible, inaudible world os secret auditory codes. Jonáš’ attention to fidelity – the very opposite of what you’d expect from such an instrument – results in glistening glitches and alien-like transmissions from the gadgets around you.

And sure enough, the Elektrosluch 3 features a lot of improvements.

There’s a full-enclosed form factor, better user experience (operate with a single pot).

And the sound has improved: the makers report that higher gain, audiophile-grade WIMA capacitors, highly increased protection of the sensors, and other tweaks have made the sound quality better.

This is what would happen if Neumann had been focused on recording EM fields instead of conventional sound.

The whole unit is portable and boasts 9V battery power plus minijack headphone/line out and line input.

Find out more about the mic and its preorder; we’ll check in again when it ships:

https://zvukolom.org/product/elektrosluch-3-pre-order/

usipro

That’s not all LOM are working on. Their Uši microphones, electret condensers, are calibrated for recording “delicate sounds” – the sounds your ear can easily discern, but that fall below the noise floor of conventional musician-focused microphones.

The 90€ basic model is a pair of twin stereo mics. Connect the minijack to a portable stereo recorder, and you’re ready to go. (Even a DSLR will work.) You get power via the mic jack, so there’s no additional power requirement.

Hurry – the preorder ends tomorrow.

https://zvukolom.org/product/usi-microphones-pre-order/

Alternatively, the Pro model has XLRs and phantom power support:

https://zvukolom.org/product/usi-pro-pre-order/

Take a listen to Jonáš’ creations, exploring these impossibly fragile sounds around his town in binaural format. (Favorite track title: “electricity from an ant’s perspective.”

The hardware is all handmade in the EU.

tshirt

And yes, I do want that t-shirt, with Martina Paukova‘s charming illustration of a field recording of the “very rare white flamingoose.”

Do check out the whole record label:

https://zvukolom.org/

LOM itself is easily a topic for another day, but it includes releases like Jonáš’ own, here:

Site Specific Resonances II by Jonáš Gruska

jonas

As part of their commitment to music that springs from the edge of human hearing – or beyond it – their latest release comes from seismic captures of the vibrations in a cement factory, by Russian-born Jan Ryhalsky.

Iron Skeletons by Jan Ryhalsky

This album was recorded in an old, partially abandoned cement factory close to the borders of Russia and China. Its skeletal metal structures are rich in haunting low-frequency (over)tones, Jan’s highly sensitive geophones (devices used for seismic recording) allow us to hear the earth-shaking sonic worlds of these ghostly locations.
Jan Ryhalsky was born and lives in the far east of Russia. He began to record sounds in 2010, and quickly dove deep into recording theory. The main focus of his research is sounds with low intensity, often beyond the threshold of human hearing.

I’ve been listening a lot to this one lately; it’s just sublime.

I really look forward to giving these mics a go myself – seems sonic wonderlands await. More on the microphones (hopefully also including work by some of you, if you get hold of them), and LOM the label and its artists, soon.

The post These mics capture sounds from the edge of human hearing – and beyond appeared first on Create Digital Music.

Join Electric Indigo, Inner8 for an Immersion in Aesthetics

electricindigo

By way of follow up to our chat with Daniele Antezza yesterday, his Inner8 live act with sYn will meet up with another audiovisual collaboration – Susanne Kirchmyer (Electric Indigo), with visualist Thomas Wagensommerer. That takes place at Berlin’s Krake Festival next week, which means we get an extensive conversation with the two artists alongside a canal in the video below.

They talk at length about aesthetics, collaboration, and connections to artistic practice:

http://krake-festival.de/

Previously, on each of them:

Outside dance music, systems of contemplation with Inner8, sYn

Morpheme is a Microscopic Audiovisual Journey Into Sound by Electric Indigo

But now that we’ve had you doing a lot of reading and watching of things this week, let’s get some music. It’s always a pleasure to listen to Susanne’s music, as her knowledge base is so deep and broad – if it’s experimental or if it’s club or if it’s composition and sound art, she’s been more or less doing all of it at the edge of what’s possible for a quarter century. So, as usual, her latest podcast is a field guide to some of the best production work going on in a bit of each of those genres, with dark experimental club sounds woven throughout. Listen:

01. John Beltran – Music For Machines [Delsin DSR-D1]
02. Ca.tter – Mine [Dubsquare 008]
03. Cio D’Or – Hecto [Semantica 73B]
04. Ken Karter – B2 [LIMITED 006]
05. MdS & Gymmy J – Purple Heart [Different Is Different 077]
06. The Plant Worker – Spaceship 003 [Affin 153]
07. Dorian Gray – Iceberg [Black String 012]
08. Aleja Sanchez – Aquatone [Planet Rhythm PRRUKD015]
09. Vertical Spectrum – Passion [Newrhythmic 051]
10. Polar Inertia – Kinematic Optics [DEMENT3D 011]
11. Leiras – Genetics [Ownlife 004]
12. Tension – In [Tension 001]
13. LXVI – Rift Sequence / DaGeneral & Nico Kohler Remix [Terminus Audio 001]
14. Eomac – Frozen Souls [Inner Surface Music 009]
15. Aleja Sanchez – Rainbow [Planet Rhythm PRRUKD015]
16. Arnaud Le Texier – Fleuve Noir [Affin 153]
17. Dorian Gray – The Polar Night / Ritual Re-Work [Black String 012]
18. Mike Storm – A1 [LIMITED 006]
19. Ruhig – Lost In The Instability / Edit Select Remix [Midgar 002X]
20. Positive Centre – Great Excavator [Stroboscopic Artefacts SAM 019]
21. Dorian Gray – Arctic Dream [Black String 012]
22. John Beltran – Intro [Delsin DSR-D1]

www.facebook.com/electricindigo

The post Join Electric Indigo, Inner8 for an Immersion in Aesthetics appeared first on Create Digital Music.

Outside dance music, systems of contemplation with Inner8, sYn

Inner8_KirilBikov

Daniele Antezza and Federico Nitti are seated in a patch of grass in the park, lost in reflection like giddy monks.

The conversation turns to archaic geometries from lost civilizations, then to how to let loose unstable configurations of sound, then how to sweep away a party crowd in the whole experience. But, perhaps true to his Mediterranean roots, Daniele’s favorite English word for describing the elements of his work is “taste.”

Inner8 is the project for people whose flavor palette turns to the experimental. Daniele is known to techno fans for his collaboration Dadub with Giovanni Conti. That act is a pillar of the sound of Stroboscopic Artefacts, and the two have a mastering operation – Artefacts Mastering – to match. If Dadub is the street-legal club operation, then, Inner8 is the wild concept car wildly tearing around a test track. And for full immersion, Daniele works with sYn – sound artist and visualist Federico Nitti – to add a live visual component.

Inner8 is both a record album and live show, and accordingly it’s on a label (Undogmatisch) that’s also an art collective and event series. The self-titled album arrived last week.

The record is I think one of the most interesting to be released this year. Far from the rambling experimental norm, here Daniele maintains a sense of focus, heart, direction. The complete record is ready to stream, and comes with a visual accompaniment employing the work of both sYn and artist collaborator Valentina Bardazzi.

Give the full record a listen (thank you, FACT):

We got to sit down with Daniele and Federico to talk signal routing, synesthesia and audiovisual process, and of course, name dropping Electro-Harmonix pedals and exploring the mysteries of the Moebius strip.

You have non-Western musical sources on the record, for example on the third track? What are we hearing there?

Daniele: My fascination with Eastern music comes from my interest in Eastern percussion. I practiced and studied Turkish music for a while, music from Algeria, Morocco. I was fascinated by the way they conceive the groove. If you think about a technique of playing a percussion part in Persia, for example, it’s very complex, but the patterns are easier to understand. It’s beautiful how thinking about those patterns works in the electronic domain. It’s just a groove I really love.

Regarding the samples I used, that’s actually Indian stuff. And I noticed that — I don’t know why — there was something in the harmony that is really Eastern. So I was fascinated about this kind of crossover in traditions and I just tried layering the Middle Eastern taste with these Indian sounds which are really ancient.

In the album, I used mainly samples from one study from an anthropologist made in the 1970s in Africa. It was funny how it all naturally fits with these crazy grooves.

So how did that come about? You had the grooves first and then you listened to the sample, and then you put the two together?

Exactly. I usually never compose grooves or patterns thinking that it’s going to become a track. I just do it because I like it. I like to improvise, to test something for the live set. So I had these patterns and I was listening to this music and thought — this is just perfect! So I just layered them. I used many processes afterwards, of course, but it started like that.

It seems like you’re working with a lot of different colors. There’s harmonic content unfolding in the distortion; it’s not just degrading the material; it’s also creating it. What was your approach to adding distortion?

I’m happy because I spent hours trying to tune in the reverbs, the ambience and the rooms I use in the tracks and so I did the same with the distortion. I wanted to achieve something rough but harmonic. So I just added the layers to the main groove. It was made through a system of distortions and feedbacks. At the end I must admit that the mix is a little bit too clean.

Too clean?

Yes, I wanted to add more character to it, but I will achieve that in my next album.

What’s the problem with it being too clean? Did you want to sound more aggressive or did you want more harmonic distortion?

My attempt was to have a mass of sound but with room. It’s kind of a paradox, because having such a wall of sound, you should sacrifice a little bit of dynamic. That’s why I used many different distortions and 95% of them are digital. I wanted to reproduce the different tastes of distortion, from the most digital to the analog. Mixing this plus my feedbacks, it sounded very rough but never in a destructive way. In the future, I want more mass. I’m just starting to figure out how to achieve it.

Inner8_powerplant

What does that processing chain look like?

It’s actually made by many reverbs and distortions plus some envelope follower – some Max for Live device – and all of this is rooted in a drone-generating system. I usually use two systems of reverbs in such a way that it creates a kind of short tails. It creates an interaction between the distortion and patches it with all the other stuff so it sounds coherent.

This is the system I needed to use because the loops I produced for the album are made about seven years ago. I made a different kind of music, had different knowledge; I was in different rooms with different techniques. So I had to create some kind of glue. Now I’m improvising more and working on these two levels – producing loops and effecting them at the same time.

It’s interesting how you work spatially, as well. You talked about using a network of reverbs — maybe it’s a nice side effect of that way of working? How did you conceive what you were working with spatially? There are a lot of sounds from different environments, there’s a lot of motion…

That’s something I’ve learned through experience. In a way, one of the aims I developed with Gio [Giovanni Conti] was to create an environment that surrounds you, but without using a surround system. So we empirically realized that when we work with how our brain perceives the depth, it’s kind of easy to create the surrounding effect. I used these tricks and techniques with Inner8 as well. It’s important because I want my music to create an experience for people. Dealing with the perception of space is important in creating an experience.

Is this something that can work in a stereo club environment? Or is it something that needs to be listened to with headphones?

It depends on the PA. But it could.

Are you doing multichannel versions?

Daniele: To be honest, no. In Undogmatisch, we are working on a launch of proper experimental series of releases. They’re going to be limited versions. The first experiment will be an album with me and Federico. For the next ones, we want to experiment in a technically proper way. We develop our tools, and the first domain to investigate will be the domain of space and perception of depth.

One of the things which is in progress now is to present Undogmatisch out of Berlin. If we manage to do that, the deal is that they have to give us the technical management of the club for that night. We want to route light and sound our own way.

Federico: The idea is to work with both audio and video and also light, perception, atmosphere… and everything should fit together. We’d like to find interesting spaces and make something really special and site-specific for the events.

A\V Show by Inner8 and sYn from sYn on Vimeo.

Sound by Inner8
Concept, Programming and Video by sYn
Vectorization and Render by Cubert

Federico, when you compose visually, how do you relate that visual structure to the sound structure? Is it the same sense of phrasing and time, or is it something different?

Federico: Sometimes it’s different; sometimes it’s doing something perfectly consistent with the musician. For example, the work of Kathy Alberici at HAU for the Mouse On Mars anniversary – Kathy showed me her setup and she’s got a feedback system going, loop pedals — and she’s a one man show and building things and adding feedback. And personally, I love feedback.

So you literally translated the audio feedback into visual feedback?

Federico: Exactly. Then I thought: okay, what kind of feedback can I get? I love to experiment, so I thought what would be great to get is a perception that there’s something alive behind the stage, somebody moving, but it wouldn’t be clear if it’s real or if it’s not. So it was about playing with feedback; I put lights behind her and I just used the silhouette of her, then filmed and processed it in real time back on the screen.

With Daniele, I first thought about his name – Inner8. One morning I had a revelation that Inner8 is clearly a moebius – a moebius [strip] with a figure 8 shape. And so the first part of the video is a 3D moebius strip which is completely live-generated and processed live, which is something I really like to do. To me, everything has to be live, I don’t like having things pre-recorded. And the second part is the part of the teaser, which is a study of a pattern. So it’s about being consistent with the work of Daniele.

I researched various patterns coming from different areas like India, Iraq, Persia — all these civilizations. I also researched their use of mathematics and how it was translated into patterns and geometry. The more I was working on it, the more I was amazed by the patterns I found. I studied and analyzed them and put together the most interesting ones to see how they react to each other.

Did this interest in geometry influence the music as well?

Daniele: In this case, unfortunately not, because the material was already done. But the live set was also conceived partly on Mirco [Magnani]‘s work. It influenced the next steps in my performance.

In future, this approach must be used for the composition of the tracks. We are also going to do the same kind of work for the next album’s artwork, which we will make together with Valentina [Bardazzi]. We are working on this album with Mirco and me and she’s starting to work on the artwork when we improvise. So in the meantime, we have a full synaesthetic session. And it’s beautiful.

That gets beyond that rational creation of these relationships, right? If people are there to improvise visually, then you have to be connected on a sub-rational, intuitive level.

Yes, definitely. And it is also about choosing the right artists. For me, collaborating with Mirco or Valentina, people who are technically extremely skilled, means that you can be totally free when thinking about art.

inner8_gaze

Is improvisation something that you’re working with?

Yes. It’s going be more and more about improvisation. Now, when I produce by myself, I can totally improvise, because otherwise it’s a little bit difficult – sometimes I focus on the technical part too much while improvising, which doesn’t work that much.

With Dadub, we enjoy being random when we work on the initial loops. But after that, it’s more about engineering and trying to create weird surroundings and so on. But with Inner8, and with the upcoming album with Mirco, it’s much more about improvisation.

You talked about externalizing things and adding more hardware.

Daniele: Yes, with Inner8 there’s much more hardware. When you know a little bit how to deal with sounds, you can create a sort of an analog taste even when you work with digital tools.

Federico: The computer is also an instrument. You find your way and learn the tools, you find your own sounds and techniques.

Inner8: Yes. But my initial background was also acoustic. I used to play the drums, guitars, bass, percussion. So having sound machines is super natural to me.

What kind of machines – without giving away all your secrets?

I rather meant effects. I just try to reproduce the feedback and generating system I use – in the software, in the digital domain.

So this digital domain is a combination of plug-ins and reverbs and live stuff? What does the hardware look like?

I use a couple of reverbs including the Electro-Harmonix Cathedral reverb. But with some algorithms, you can tune your feedback while you are playing, so you can create patterns on the fly. I really love that sound, it’s super deep. I’m combining this with the Jomox Resonator, with the Superego by Electro Harmonix for freezing and sampling in real time. I like it because that pedal can freeze parts of sounds depending on the amplitude. I also found this really nice pedal by Pigtronix called Philosopher King. I like it because you can trigger with a signal so it’s kind of a side chain with a massive distortion and compression. It gives you the possibility to get really fat sounds. It also routes the envelope to the output. And you can have a responsive system.

Then I have a couple of cheap delays. Now I have to combine all these with my digital chain which is going to be a challenge, because when you try to put too many things together, you have to filter and calibrate and everything.

Metaphysical from Shapednoise on Vimeo.

‘Metaphysical’ is the A/V show of sound artist, Shapednoise, and visual artist, sYn.

Federico, what do your visuals look like? You come from sound background. How do you set things up?

Federico: Well, I got properly into visuals quite late. For a long time, I didn’t know whether to choose sound or photography, but eventually I chose sound. What I like about both disciplines is that you never stop learning. And surprisingly, working on these two things, aesthetics are quite consistent in both disciplines. At some point, you end up making visuals, because you can see the pictures, you can feel the music and they work so well together. I guess I’m lucky because I’m really technical; I like to research and dig things to find the best way to make it work together.

Do you synchronize anything in the A/V shows?

Federico: For the coming shows, yes. We are going to work on sound analysis more. But so far we are both improvising a lot, which is quite special nowadays, to purely improvise live together.

Daniele: I started to learn how to make electronic music because of improvisation. I was always fascinated by that, maybe because I was playing instruments. But when I came to Berlin, I had to dedicate about 90% of my time to sound engineering. Now, I’ve gained a bit of time to be a musician. That’s why I want to dig deeper in the improvisation again.

How much do you take with you for playing live? You obviously don’t have everything you have in the studio… How do bring your album back on and perform it live?

Daniele: I just select four to five effects. Then I need a good mixer and now I still use Ableton to launch my loops, but I’m going to remove it as soon as possible. Maybe in the future, I will also use percussion. But for now, it’s just a mixer for sending the loops and linking the digital chains of effects. That’s easy now, I have only one crossover from the mixer to the digital chain so I can select and route the frequencies. But that’s just a first step; I need to integrate it more.

But I will always, always continue to use the computer. Even if I have a beautiful hardware chain, I sample the sounds and process as much as I can through my digital knowledge. In my opinion, to renounce or say my manifesto is analog is just to say okay I don’t want to see the green. It’s beautiful when you can see all the colors, when you can use all of the tools you have. It’s full of beautiful toys. You have so many possibilities. It’s a system of universes of choices!

Federico, what is your visual rig like when playing live?

Right now, it’s a bloody computer. I like custom things. It’s usually a combination of Max/MSP and Jitter. Max/MSP most of the time for many things, because it’s the logic part. You can just imagine things how you want, just make your own thing. You don’t depend on software that’s closed. My controlling part is written in Max, and I trigger Jitter or I trigger Quartz Composer through VDMX. All the processing, sound analysis, all that is done in Max.

The problem is, you get tired of computers. Future projects, I want to be as analog as possible. But I work on some old analog gear like video mixers, as well – and bends. The idea is to make it as an instrument, a bent instrument with CV and gates, so I can also work with a modular system, dealing with video and sound at the same time, triggering and working with each other. I want to get into electronics. I’m done with computers.

Thank you, gentlemen. Here’s looking forward to the upcoming live show — and everything else Undogmatisch has in store.

https://www.facebook.com/Inner8/

http://aleatory-am.com/e/inner8/

Photos: Kiril Bikov; courtesy Undogmatisch.

Interview editing: Zuzana Friday P?ikrylová for CDM.

The post Outside dance music, systems of contemplation with Inner8, sYn appeared first on Create Digital Music.

Inside hands-on live technique with Blush Response, KOMA, Elektron

blushrig

The sound world of Joey Blush (aka Blush Response) is far reaching, entering dark clouds of murky industrial, EBM, and techno, all with relentless forward-pushing grooves. But as we talk to him about how he connects his gear, we’re really looking at how he connects his thoughts.

At its best, whatever we’re doing with gear ought to be about our minds. It’s not just connecting a patch cord. It’s connecting an idea from one place to another – re-wiring neurons.

Synth legend Morton Subotnick spoke this week about that process, as he recalled first creating complex metric structures simply by patching together loops on hardware modular sequencers (there, via the Buchla). As rhythmic structures emerged, he blew his own brain open – and the landmark record Silver Apples on the Moon was born. And I thought of this:

“You’re sequencing the sequence!”

I heard a smiling Wouter Jaspers of KOMA Elektronik repeat that phrase like a Zen koan. His sequencer isn’t intended to be simple. It’s even called Komplex.

The Komplex sequencer has reached the final prototype stage, with a release in coming weeks. Joey Blush visited KOMA Elektronik in their studio to play with the Komplex and a host of modules.

And what’s significant about this is that it is a return to some of what Morton was talking about back in the 60s. This isn’t about something abstract; it’s getting hands-on, gestural control over sounds, so that there’s a direct line from your instinct to making some change in the sound by moving your body.

Literally, how is Joey making the connection? He sends over his signal flow to CDM, in terms of what you see in the KOMA video:

The oscillator is an Intellijel Shapeshifter
into a WMD synchrodyne
into a KOMA SVF-201
A Manhattan Analog VCA on the end
being modulated by MATHS. [uh, the module, though everything I do is modulated by maths!]
Everything is sequenced by the Komplex sequencer
Drums are the [Roland AIRA] TR8 through the [KOMA] FT201

Now, that was a short demo. For a proper live set, let’s have a watch and listen through the blueish smoke of a live set at Hoxton Square Bar & Kitchen, London, from 25 May.

Here’s the breakdown for that:

two voices being sequenced by electron octatrack – mutable yarns as midi converter, elektron analog rytm doing drums. All tweaks are done by hand here. I have the OT loaded with sequences I’ve made, more than I need for an entire set, so that I can call up different ones at will and create new ‘tracks’ by tweaking the patch parameters and coming across new things. What you are seeing is sort of a live patching experiment. I know where things have to go but how I get there is different every time.

blush

I also had an interesting conversation with Joey about how he works with the Elektron Octatrack and Analog Rytm drum machines. He’s actually integrating them with the modulars, using them to make things morph even more. And no Eurorack snobbery here – using drum machines like the AIRA or, here, the Elektron, means he always has convenient access to sounds:

I use the octatrack as my main sequencer for the eurorack live and in the studio.

I can sequence CC changes using the midi to cv converter (currently a Vermona QMI) so I can have these evolving sequences that sound like cut up parts you would have done in a computer.

The RYTM handles all percussion duties for obvious reasons – it’s monstrous and it’s a bit easier to carry than a bigger eurorack case.

I really love Joey’s sonic imagination. It’s heavy, it’s industrial, but isn’t just arbitrarily bleak – there’s heart and, somehow, warmth in it. Take this track:

Or a full live set:

This album is well worth a listen:

The Drift by Blush Response

And now, the 12″ Future Tyrants is up on Bandcamp:

FUTURE TYRANTS by BLUSH RESPONSE

https://blushresponse.bandcamp.com/album/future-tyrants

Thanks to Joey for the juicy details.

Check the official site:
http://www.wearereplicants.com/

All photos courtesy the artist.

The post Inside hands-on live technique with Blush Response, KOMA, Elektron appeared first on Create Digital Music.

deadmau5 wants EDM DJS to actually play, produces Tumblr poetry in the process

deadmau5talent

deadmau5 has a message for DJs: don’t just DJ.

here is what i dont get [Tumblr]

And we couldn’t agree more. For once, bless the mouse – and, give the man some credit, he has a sense of humor and self-deprecation. (That’s his image above, not ours.)

But keep reading – things are about to get cut-up surreal poetic in just a second.

Joel Zimmerman’s message has come a long way. Just back in 2012, he cynically suggested everyone on the scene was just “pushing play” and asked everyone to quit pretending already – fair, perhaps, but not entirely optimistic. And I gave him a hard time for it, because I though it was unfair to the people who were assembling live performances (deadmau5 walked back some of his original article and gave some credit to all y’all controllerists out there):
Deadmau5, Honest About His Own Press-Play Sets, Misses Out On “Scene”

Now, though, he’s saying something different: quit just playing CDs and actually jam live. Play a keyboard. Hook up some MIDI or OSC control. Do something. And sure enough, his own bio rejects the notion of CDs and emphasizes playing his own tracks (live PA style) and on-the-fly cutting and editing (though I’d have to research more what he’s actually doing).

It’s clearly a message the top of the EDM circuit needs to hear, and one the CDM readership would almost certainly endorse. I’d agree with every single word, except I do feel obligated to say I feel strongly that there’s a role for good mixing and selection, for DJs. And even if deadmau5 doesn’t want to be called a DJ, other people may be fine with it. On the other hand, people booked around a hit “banger” aren’t likely to surprise anyone with their subtle track selection, too much faking keyboard lines to the audience is obnoxious, and I frankly what deadmau5 is describing, absolutely, I agree – it’s horrific.

I agree – you and all your friends, probably, agree – so much so that under normal circumstances bringing all this would be boring. Except that this being deadmau5, eloquent troll for all electronic music everywhere on the Internet, it takes another turn. Okay, not only did deadmau5 run to the defense of the poor horses subjected to David Guetta’s nightmare-dystopian Pascha opening, but now this. (Yes, horses, the four-legged kind, though “objectification of women” or “Native American racism” could easily have been topics – that was a three-for-one Ibiza fail there.)

Here’s what I want: I want a t-shirt for each one of these phrases:

you show up to X shitfest, and play a CD.

STOP.

I AM CONFUSED.

Word.

are you or are you not a guy who can use a comupter to make music?

CDM has a new logo and redesign launching before summer is out. Now I have the phrase that will go on the back.

Alternatively, these:

WATCH MY HAND. IT GOES DOOT DOOT DOOT DOOT”

youre beyond a CD player.

And the best:

So you cant pllay a keyboard? COOL! ME NEITHER! MIDI bro.

OSC is the latest fuckin craze.

get your script on bitch.

Printed.

Framed.

throw down some smpte on another track to sync some tailored visuals too…

I swear I’m going to get motion back up, too.

Actually, as I’m playing this weekend, I’ve composed my own little poem, in the style of deadmau5. People ask me about my own story, so here it is.

I’m setting an egg timer and briefly pretending I don’t know how to type in the hopes that it will come out like a deadmau5 Tumblr rant.

so, im actually like this composer whatever in new york but i turn into this cdm blogger man.

and im making music im like fuckin aroung with abledong live and that whatever looping stretching thing with all the grain settings long aso i can play a modern dance performance in brooklyn that winds up going for like an hour and i want it to be all ambient.

im making waves. i rinse it. i shave it. shave it all off.

and then im suddenly in berlin and making techno because i went to barghain a few 2 many times and now i dont know i might just dj this weekend just in case people get borded of me lining up claps on my korg volca meeblip rig because you know i listen to some tracks some time and likke to dance san dso they sometimse want me to play the whole damn thing

i show up to club x, i show up to club y, i show up to club xy i really need a booking manager

i never pirated nothing its all nfr nfr nfr

so i get the d2 the native instruments thing maybe i play with stems that’s the new shit like four tracks of whatever so im doing something creative but thats not ready yet i dont no if native instruments is reading this far but yeah im down for some stems

i totally forgot what this was supposed to be about im stopping now.

now everyone in canada knows mu name

i am totally a guy who can use a comupter to make music because create digtial fockin music yo craz cats.

i cant believe i sat through a whole film yestrday that told me computers are shit computers totally arent shit did you hear from deamdouse people areplaying like cds for 200k something? dollars? whoa. i should get into edm. then i could afford a modular i dream of wires right now i can kind of mainly only afford those nfrs and my meeblp which im obligated to tell you is available now from dotcom.

i can totally play a keyboard which is good because if i couldn’t im not sure how id’ fix it with MIDI or osc or the 80s bro.

DANKE SHÖN DIR!

Okay.

That almost sort of worked. Not really.

I really do hope someone in EDM starts playing synth lines over top of their set or adds fireworks and singing ladies behind them or whatever the point of this rant actually was. Sounds good. I … probably won’t get to see it, assuming I do stay away from Electric Daisy Carnival.

But I think deadmau5 didn’t mean the whole IDM scene in general.

The post deadmau5 wants EDM DJS to actually play, produces Tumblr poetry in the process appeared first on Create Digital Music.

Concubine, the free album you need, has an app-made video to match

concubine

Can you think, dance, and dream at the same time? We get to debut a new video for Concubine, and it’s the perfect time to look at what this duo has accomplished in 2015.

Concubine, the project from Noah Pred and Rick Bull, is never cold, but it’s always expressing several sentiments simultaneously. It’s at once hypnotic and cerebral, visceral and abstract. Smartly-calibrated percussion politely swings atop future-prog funk flights of fancy. It’ll get a little cheeky, but within a song framework that’s been obsessively constructed. And the album itself is put together similarly. Driving dance tracks are effortless interspersed with ambient tracks that keep the dynamic energy moving – rather than feeling like incidental excursions. It is relentlessly high quality, always at a level of polish – music made by proper gentlemen who nonetheless know how to have a good time. By the time the synth sirens start going off in Entropia, you’re ready for a night out in Blade Runner’s Michelin-starred restaurant and … see where the night leads.

This is exactly the sort of music you’d expect to form when two richly-experienced producers combine efforts. Australian-born Rick Bull is better known as Deepchild, the versatile and prolific house and techno DJ and producer with outings on Get Physical and Leisure System and more. Noah Pred we’ve seen round these parts before; the Thoughtless Music label chief has bridged Canada and Berlin with prescient good taste while remaining productive with his own music. (See Juno-nominated Third Culture, for one.)

Both artists also have spoken about how this production (and subsequent live show) helped each of them through tough life turns – it’s deeply attentive music making as therapy.

And so Concubine has been widely visible in critical attention, but has also generally flown under the radar of crowds looking for more quickly-digestible snacks. This is a dance album that demands some processing – some time to settle into the details. It doesn’t stray too far from its references in technique; it elevates those techniques to peak performance, which requires you to sharpen your ears. They’re producers’ producers, and this is the record that fits that, a fleshed out full-length in the desert of EPs.

Clearly, then, if you have escaped downloading it already, go do it. It’s free from the mini-site for the self-titled debut, and you can pay what you want on Bandcamp – just the means of consuming music other DJs, producers, and enthusiasts now prefer.

https://concubinesound.bandcamp.com/releases
http://www.concubine.cc/

What we get now is a music video – premiering here exclusively on CDM.

Concubine – Luxend [Video Edit] from Concubine Sound on Vimeo.

The official video for Luxend from the debut Concubine album – download it free: http://www.concubine.cc

https://www.facebook.com/concubinesound
https://soundcloud.com/concubine-berlin
https://concubinesound.bandcamp.com
https://twitter.com/concubinesound
http://www.concubine.cc

Mastered by Roofless Creations: http://www.rooflesscreations.com
Video created with Generate Pro: http://www.generateapp.com

Also on YouTube if you prefer to share there.

Happily, it takes the record’s funkiest outing, Luxend. The film is a rainbow-hued spin in the woods, monster vision rave style. It feels more improvised than the production of the music, perhaps, but it also has a unique real-time source.

The video was created live with Generate, the new iOS and Android app that lets you reimagine video creating and sharing by applying spontaneous creative filters. Instead of the edit and edit and render workflow, Generate is part paint tool, part video, made for in-the-moment videos – and certainly worth a look on its own soon. Noah and Rick are evidently part of the artist program, using the app and providing feedback.

http://blog.generateapp.com/

Rick and Noah did an all-hardware set live at Panorama Bar in June; I’ll be keen to see where they drive this project next. Stay tuned.

SoundCloud / Bandcamp:

Concubine by Concubine

The post Concubine, the free album you need, has an app-made video to match appeared first on Create Digital Music.

The Spinning Heart Machine by Martin Smith

Martin Smith is co-founder the design label Laikingland. He creates kinetic devices that explore a variety of themes. Shown here is the latest in a series of kinetic objects that celebrate love. As the handle is turned, two pairs of bevel gears cause the heart to flip and rotate simultaneously.

Materials: Steel, brass and plastic.
Dimensions: Height 33cm / 13”
Power: Hand operated.
Edition: 25
Color: Red, brass and patinated steel.

You can see more kinetic objects by Martin Smith on his web site.


Drum machines in your browser, and more places to find Web Audio and MIDI

screenshot_62

Open a new tab, and suddenly you have a powerful, sequenced drum synth making grooves. Give it a shot:
https://irritantcreative.ca/projects/x0x
Or read more. (This latest creation came out in June.)

This is either the future of collaborative music making or the Single Greatest Way To Make Music While Pretending To Do Other Work I’ve ever seen.

But, as a new effort works on sharing music scores in the browser, it’s worth checking up on the Web Audio API – the stuff that makes interactive sound possible – and connections to hardware via MIDI.

And there’s a lot going on, the sort of fertile conversation that could lead to new things.

Web Audio and Web MIDI are quite fresh, so developers around the world are getting together to learn from one another and discuss what’s possible. That includes the USA, UK, and Germany:

London: http://www.meetup.com/Web-Audio-London/
New York: http://www.meetup.com/New-York-Web-Audio-Meetup/
Berlin: http://www.meetup.com/berlin-web-audio-meetup/
Philly: http://www.meetup.com/Philly-Web-Audio-Meetup/

Paris was also host to an annual, international conference, which took place this year at famed research center IRCAM.

Online synths and other proofs of concept are likely just the beginning. Web music development began as a sometimes muddled conversation about whether browsers will replace traditional app deployment (so far, probably not). But as the tech has matured, developers are instead looking to ways to use the Web to create new kinds of apps that perhaps didn’t make sense as standalone tools in “native” software (or, for that matter, hardware).

That’s why it’ll be interesting to watch efforts like Yamaha’s to add browser-based patch editing and sharing for their Reface line. There are also more ambitious ideas, like using the browser to share audio for interviews, radio conversations, backup, and works-anywhere recording and streaming.

And there’s more.

Keith McMillen has a great two-article series introducing you to Web MIDI.

It explains what this is all about and what it can do – whether or not you are a developer, worth reading. And if you are a developer, code snippets!

There’s even some explanation of how to use MIDI code outside of Chrome. (Firefox and even Microsoft’s new Edge promise support soon.)

Making Music in the Browser – Web MIDI API

Making Music in the Browser – Web Audio API, Part 1

And their blog in general is full of surprisingly geeky wonderful stuff, not the normal marketing stuff. (In fact, let’s be fair, you’d fire your marketing manager if they did this. But… kudos.)

http://www.keithmcmillen.com/blog/

When we first started using the Web, it seemed like a clumsy way to duplicate things done better elsewhere. Now, it promises to be something different: a place that takes the software and hardware we love, and makes it more useful and connected. There’s something wonderful about switching the Internet off in the studio and focusing on making music for a while. But in this model, when you do turn the Internet on again, it becomes a place to focus more on music rather than be distracted.

The post Drum machines in your browser, and more places to find Web Audio and MIDI appeared first on Create Digital Music.

The next Web standard could be music notation

Telemann

The role of the music score is an important one, as a lingua franca – it puts musical information in a format a lot of people can read. And it does that by adhering to standards.

Now with computers, phones, and tablets all over the planet, can music notation adapt?

A new group is working on bringing digital notation as a standard to the Web. The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) – yes, the folks who bring you other Web standards – formed what they’re describing as a “community group” to work on notation.

That doesn’t mean your next Chrome build will give you lead sheets. W3C are hosting, not endorsing the project – not yet. And there’s a lot of work to be done. But many of the necessary players are onboard, which could mean some musically useful progress.

The news arrived in my inbox by way of Hamburg-based Steinberg. That’s no surprise; we knew back in 2013 that the core team behind Sibelius had arrived at Steinberg after a reorganization at Avid pushed them out of the company they original started.

The other big player in the group is MakeMusic, developers of Finale. And they’re not mincing words: they’re transferring the ownership of the MusicXML interchange format to the new, open group:
MakeMusic Transfers MusicXML Development to W3C [musicxml.com]

The next step: make notation work on the Web. Sibelius were, while not the first to put notation on the Web, the first to popularize online sharing as a headline feature in a mainstream notation tool. Sibelius even had a platform for sharing and selling scores, complete with music playback. But that was dependent on a proprietary plug-in – now, the browser is finally catching up, and we can do all of the things Scorch does right in browser.

So, it’s time for an open standard. And the basic foundation already exists. The new W3C Music Notation Community Group promises to “maintain and update” two existing standards – MusicXML and the awkwardly-acronym’ed SMuFL (Standard Music Font Layout). Smuffle sounds like a Muppet from Sesame Street, but okay.

These are two important pieces of the puzzle.

MusicXML is a standard format for describing the entire score in a way that can be exchanged. It’s supported by 200 applications already; it’d be terrific to see native support in browser like Chrome and Firefox and Safari. Currently, the format is managed by MakeMusic and its VP of Research and Development — the original creator, Michael Good. MakeMusic acquired the technology along with Recordare, who built support for other apps. Unlike some acquisitions, cough, they’ve since expanded, not contracted, support and compatibility.

SMuFL helps you standardize which symbols get mapped to codes and how they’re added to a score – so that specialized (Western) music symbols show up correctly. (You want the right code, and you want it to show up in the right place on the score!) SMuFL was introduced by Daniel Spreadbury (he’s now at Steinberg) in 2013, but it’s also set to be built into a coming version of Finale. Basically, the idea is to expand upon the woefully inadequate mappings in Unicode to cover the sorts of symbols people working with scores use every day.

And that’s what this is all about: the notation software business benefits from more compatibility. The easier it is to share scores, the more people make scores, and the more they can use notation tools. Accordingly, the group will be co-chaired by Michael Good, Steinberg’s Daniel Spreadbury, and Noteflight’s Joe Berkovitz. Significantly, Mr. Berkovitz also chairs the W3C Audio group that’s been moving along in-browser sound. That puts the whole initiative in very capable hands.

Also, because Noteflight is owned by Hal Leonard, that leading digital and print publisher of scores is also involved.

That said, there’s room to look more broadly. I will put on my academic hat and strongly urge the W3C community group to consider an expanded music notational language for the Web covering non-Western notational systems. Graphic notation (as in experimental composition) is perhaps best described simply with existing open-ended graphic languages, but there are some extended notational systems in common use in such a way that they could be standardized. Music notation standards also should consider a non-Western perspective. The proposal to me calls out for a third “puzzle piece” specification, and actually the Web would be an ideal place to experiment, as it’s nearly universally accessible and not bound by the kinds of economies of development, marketing, resale, and support that restrict monolithic notation programs like Finale or Sibelius.

I’m also concerned that so far the people developing the standard represent only technologists selling music software and don’t yet include input from the realms of music theory and musicology. Desktop publishing worked because of rich input from people who worked directly with traditional typography and design; color formulations require an understanding of how color is used outside only how it is reproduced.

Fortunately, this is project features an open call.

Find out more about the group:
https://www.w3.org/community/music-notation/

Read Michael’s excellent opening story on how these projects evolved and what the group intends to do:

He talks specifically about expanding interactive and Web possibilities, starting with updating these existing formats. And that could reach a lot of people:
Introducing the Music Notation Community Group

The group aims to serve a broad range of users engaging in music-related activities involving notation. These users include, among others, software developers, music publishers, composers, performers, students, listeners, scholars and librarians. Some of the activities covered include composing, arranging, preparing, performing, teaching, learning, studying, and enjoying notated music.

Call for Participation in Music Notation Community Group

This seems to me a promising start, and putting this on the Web could more easily invite just that sort of input.

If the Web is about sharing ideas, the ability to share scores, to be able to communicate intentions to other musicians, must surely be fundamental. Our browser may still be catching up with what paper could do in the 19th Century. But this could be the beginning of 21st century notation, too.

At top: an example of what you can do with MusicXML.

The post The next Web standard could be music notation appeared first on Create Digital Music.

Watch How Arturia’s BeatStep Pro Sequences All Your Gear – Mega Meta Roundup

beatstepproangle

Do call it a comeback. The hardware sequencer, once a forgotten relic of the computer age, has returned with a vengeance. And the reason is simple: we need it. Sure, we might play with a computer, but we’ve fallen for other synthesizers and drum machines – a lot of it quite cheap, too. We want hands-on control so we can play live again, improvise with our hands rather than furrow our brows over a mouse and screen. And we might even have beloved analog gear and want it to groove along with everything else.

Few companies represent the blossoming of love for gear quite like Arturia. It was just a few short years ago that the name meant plug-in emulations of vintage gear. Now, people are more likely to think of something like the hardware MicroBrute synth.

Arturia’s first BeatStep was cool – a combination step sequencer and drum pad controller. But it was also limited: you could only sequence one part, and pattern triggering options were woefully limited.

This month, the company has shipped the long-awaited BeatStep Pro. I’m finishing a review now – it’ll be an in-depth hands-on, and I’m also waiting to make sure I have the latest firmware changes.

But since I’m focusing on those details rather than rushing, we can meanwhile watch some videos of just how this gear looks in action. And you can let me know if that raises other questions – what do you want to know? What gear do you care about working with? I’ll answer as much as I can in our review.

For starters, here are ten analog synths – plus Ableton Live. (Digital or analog? Yes.)

SonicState have gone into a detailed hands-on video:

SonicSense (not to be confused with the previous) have a film that shows how you’d use this live as both an analog (CV) and digital (MIDI) controller, with other hardware.

They’ve also gone step by step through a demo as a sort of tutorial, walking you through how you get started with the hardware:

Source have a hands-on with simultaneous live use of the analog and digital modes:

For more detailed breakdown, Arturia have gone into each individual mode. First, here are your connection options:

While it’s obvious you can do rhythmic sequencing from those pads, it’s also worth seeing the dedicated melodic mode:

And yes, that drum sequencing, too:

And even with all those jacks round the back, it is very possible that you would decide to justify the purchase of your BeatStep Pro solely on the basis of working with a computer. Here’s Arturia on combining it with Ableton Live (though workflow with other DAWs would be reasonably similar, too, so this remains relevant):

Some nice experiments from Tomeso in Germany – love the techniques here:

Seq1 controls Arturia MiniBrute SE via CV
Seq2 controls Arturia MicroBrute SE via CV
Drum Seq controls Arturia Spark 2 software via MIDI
The EPSi convolution reverb is integrated as a send effect via the recording interface. No additional effects.

Lastly, with all the talk of gear, let’s finish with some music making. Arturia traveled to Utrecht to visit the lovely Sonar Traffic and see how they work:

So, what would you like to see? And did we miss any good videos (like yours, for instance)? Let us know in comments.

The post Watch How Arturia’s BeatStep Pro Sequences All Your Gear – Mega Meta Roundup appeared first on Create Digital Music.

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  • Debate on Participation and Transparency with the Madrid City Council's new Citizen Participation, Transparency and Open Government Area July 30, 2015
    The new government of the Madrid City Council has created an area for participation and transparency that invites to an open debate on participation and transparency with citizens.With the participation of Pablo Soto, Delegated Councelman of the Citizen Participation, Transparency and Open Government Area; Vicky Anderica, Director of the Transparency Project […]
  • Young Social Makers: Call for Participation July 30, 2015
    Young Social Makers is an object creation workshop with a social orientation aimed at 15-25 years old people that takes place from September 24 to October 4, 2015 at Medialab-Prado's FabLab.  Young Social Makers is part of the Funcionamientos project and a collaboration between Fundación Orange, Fundación Tecnología Social and Medialab-Prado.Teachers: G […]
  • Open Call for Residencies in Medialab-Prado for the Development of Citizen Innovation Projects for Ibero-America July 30, 2015
    The Ibero-American General Secretariat's for Citizen Innovation (Segib) and Medialab-Prado issue a call to select three projects to be prototyped in a two-weeks residency in Medialab-Prado.Dealine: August 14, 2015 […]
  • Our Shared Scenario July 30, 2015
    OUR SHARED SCENARIO is a space to explore other ideas about the community. An artistic workshop to establish a complete artistic process for people located all around the world through a custom-made online platform for kids and youngsters.  Open registration until September 1, 2015. […]
  • Virtual Reality and Narrative Workshop July 28, 2015
    A prototyping workshop of interactive narratives and virtual reality to collaboratively experiment the storytelling resources and technical challenges of this new environment.   […]
  • Digital Communication Workshop July 23, 2015
    This workshop is aimed at social agents with different levels of appropiation of tools based on digital technologies who want to reinforce the quaility of their communication. […]

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  • call: Radical Networks
    Call for entries Deadline: 10 August 2015 Radical Networks From mass surveillance to the over-commercialization of the Internet, the technology that we depend upon for community and connection is being compromised. The recent accessibility of networking technology through devices such as the Raspberry Pi and software such as BATMAN Adv has made it affordable […]
  • call: Paris International Human Rights Film Festival
    Call for entries Deadline: 30 September 2015 The 14th edition of the Paris International Human Rights Film Festival will be held during spring 2016 in Paris and Ile-de-France. You can now submit your documentary, fiction and animation films! 3 easy steps: 1. Read and accept the Festival’s rules and regulations http://www.festival-droitsdelhomme.org/paris/ima […]
  • call: Time And/Or Butterflies
    Call for entries Deadline: 8 August 2015 Call For Video/Animation About Time And/Or Butterflies Coloring Coorain is seeking submissions of short video/animation/film, to be screened in the program! For this call, we are looking for video/animation/film work under 2 minutes in length, with 30 seconds to 1 minute being idea, that is about butterflies AND//OR t […]
  • call: Simultan Festival
    Call for entries Deadline: 5 August 2015 Simultan Festival 2015 – Call For Video Submissions SIMULTAN is an annual festival held in Timisoara, Romania – dedicated to media art, experimental music & sound. The 11th edition of the Simultan Festival will take place between 7-10 October 2015, under the theme ‘TALKING TO STRANGERS’. What would Voyager 3 conta […]
  • call: Symposium: “OPEN ALL PORTS”
    Call for entries Deadline: 30 September 2015 Call For Submissions – Ammerman Center For Arts And Technology At Connecticut College. 15th Biennial Arts And Technology Symposium “OPEN ALL PORTS” The Ammerman Center at Connecticut College seeks submissions for its 2016 Biennial Symposium for Arts and Technology being held February 25-27, 2016 at Connecticut Col […]
  • call: Masters & Servers
    Call for entries Deadline: 20 September 2015 Masters & Servers OPEN CALL for work ​Masters & Servers is a programme of activities devoted to the investigation of networked cultures in the post-digital age. Five key organisations in the European contemporary and media arts – Aksioma (Slovenia), Drugo More (Croatia), Link Art Center (Italy), Abandon No […]
  • call: animateCOLOGNE 2016
    Call for entries extended deadline: 26 October 2015 4th animateCOLOGNE – Cologne Art & Animation Festival (aC4) to take place in India in February 2016 is now accepting submissions for its 4th edition. Founded in 2012 by Wilfried Agricola de Cologne in the framework of CologneOFF – the international festival network – operating since more than 10 years f […]
  • call: Sprint – Rambert Digital Creative Residency
    Call for entries Deadline: 10 September 2015 Sprint – Rambert Digital Creative Residency Sprint is a new initiative to foster relationships between digital creatives and Rambert’s dance practitioners. Sprint aims to facilitate experimentation and exchange of knowledge, and open up approaches using technology. We are looking for artists and creatives working […]
  • call: TV Project Odessa
    Call for entries Deadline: 1 October 2015 Ongoing call for video documentations of actual artist-led projects. Project “TV has attacked us all our lives, now we fight back. Now we make our own TV/Nam June Paik” is broadcast twice a week, Saturday and Sunday, on Odessa regional cable TV and Radio channel “Odessa”, Ukraine (partner of the project) and is curat […]
  • call: The First Catskill Digital Art Competition
    Call for entries Dedaline: 5 October 2015 The First Catskill Digital Art Competition Who we are: Atelier Progressif Creative Space in Catskill, NY, is interested in pushing the boundaries of digital art and technology. We are soliciting critical essays, film, artwork, design, and process pieces that employ the tools of digital culture. We believe the new gen […]

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  • Psychologists May Bar Role in National Security Interrogations
    The board and then members of the American Psychological Association are expected to approve a ban on psychologists participating in any way in national security interrogations, The New York Times reported. The association is facing a severe scandal over revelations that some of its leaders worked closely with with Central Intelligence Agency and Defense Dep […]
  • Ohio State Band Used Song to Mock Holocaust Victims
    Ohio State University's marching band, widely considered one of the best in the country, had a parody song in its songbook that mocked Holocaust victims, The Wall Street Journal reported. The song, to the tune of Journey's "Don't Stop Believin'," featured lyrics about Nazi soldiers “searching for people livin’ in their neighbor’ […]
  • Friday Fragments
    Blog: Confessions of a Community College DeanThere’s a piece making the rounds about Baumol’s cost disease that’s both smart and confused.   It starts by implying that explanations of tuition spirals that draw on Baumol’s cost disease are mistaken. But it sort of shifts ground halfway through, implying that it actually has been true until now, but that techn […]
  • Colleges start new programs
    Rice University is starting a master's program in energy economics. Seminole State College of Florida is starting an associate of science and a certificate program in supply chain management. University of Dallas is starting a master of arts in classics and a master of classics. University of Texas at Austin is starting a doctor of nursing practice degr […]
  • Revised AP U.S. history framework seeks to calm critics
    Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson are in, Ronald Reagan is no longer “bellicose,” and the Gilded Age is a little shinier — at least as the far as the new Advanced Placement U.S. History Framework is concerned. In response to criticism that a previous framework portrayed American history in too negative a light, with too little emphasis on American excep […]
  • Appeals Court Partially Backs Adjunct's Disability Claim
    A federal appeals court on Thursday partially overturned a lower court's dismissal of an adjunct professor's lawsuit accusing Moraine Valley Community College of discriminating against him on the basis of disability. The decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit found that the lower court incorrectly dismissed William Silk' […]
  • Federal work-study pays off best for students at public colleges, but increases debt loads
    Students who participate in federal work-study are more likely to graduate and get a job after college. But those who get the biggest academic benefits from the program -- low-income students at public colleges who would have worked anyhow -- are the least likely to receive the federal grants. Those are the primary findings from a newly released study by two […]
  • Kaplan, Lincoln Tech Settle with Mass. Attorney General
    Kaplan Career Institute and Lincoln Technical Institute have settled with the Massachusetts attorney general, Maura Healey, to resolve allegations of inflating job placement numbers and employing unfair recruiting tactics, Healey's office said in a written statement. The settlement is part of Healey's broad pursuit of the for-profit industry. Kapla […]
  • Draft law to regulate foreign NGOs in China could have serious effects for educational exchanges
    A draft law that would require foreign nongovernmental organizations to register their activities with police authorities in China has American universities worried about a chilling effect on educational exchanges of all types. The draft law defines foreign NGOs broadly and is sweeping in its scope, seemingly applying not only to universities that have physi […]
  • Court Orders Chicago State Not to Mess With Faculty Blog
    A federal judge has directed officials at Chicago State University not to interfere with the operations of a faculty blog that has been highly critical of the administration. Chicago State has tried in recent years to shut down or otherwise silence The Faculty Voice, which regularly criticizes university officials. Two faculty members responsible for the blo […]

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  • Psychologists May Bar Role in National Security Interrogations
    The board and then members of the American Psychological Association are expected to approve a ban on psychologists participating in any way in national security interrogations, The New York Times reported. The association is facing a severe scandal over revelations that some of its leaders worked closely with with Central Intelligence Agency and Defense Dep […]
  • Ohio State Band Used Song to Mock Holocaust Victims
    Ohio State University's marching band, widely considered one of the best in the country, had a parody song in its songbook that mocked Holocaust victims, The Wall Street Journal reported. The song, to the tune of Journey's "Don't Stop Believin'," featured lyrics about Nazi soldiers “searching for people livin’ in their neighbor’ […]
  • Friday Fragments
    Blog: Confessions of a Community College DeanThere’s a piece making the rounds about Baumol’s cost disease that’s both smart and confused.   It starts by implying that explanations of tuition spirals that draw on Baumol’s cost disease are mistaken. But it sort of shifts ground halfway through, implying that it actually has been true until now, but that techn […]
  • Colleges start new programs
    Rice University is starting a master's program in energy economics. Seminole State College of Florida is starting an associate of science and a certificate program in supply chain management. University of Dallas is starting a master of arts in classics and a master of classics. University of Texas at Austin is starting a doctor of nursing practice degr […]
  • Revised AP U.S. history framework seeks to calm critics
    Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson are in, Ronald Reagan is no longer “bellicose,” and the Gilded Age is a little shinier — at least as the far as the new Advanced Placement U.S. History Framework is concerned. In response to criticism that a previous framework portrayed American history in too negative a light, with too little emphasis on American excep […]
  • Appeals Court Partially Backs Adjunct's Disability Claim
    A federal appeals court on Thursday partially overturned a lower court's dismissal of an adjunct professor's lawsuit accusing Moraine Valley Community College of discriminating against him on the basis of disability. The decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit found that the lower court incorrectly dismissed William Silk' […]
  • Federal work-study pays off best for students at public colleges, but increases debt loads
    Students who participate in federal work-study are more likely to graduate and get a job after college. But those who get the biggest academic benefits from the program -- low-income students at public colleges who would have worked anyhow -- are the least likely to receive the federal grants. Those are the primary findings from a newly released study by two […]
  • Kaplan, Lincoln Tech Settle with Mass. Attorney General
    Kaplan Career Institute and Lincoln Technical Institute have settled with the Massachusetts attorney general, Maura Healey, to resolve allegations of inflating job placement numbers and employing unfair recruiting tactics, Healey's office said in a written statement. The settlement is part of Healey's broad pursuit of the for-profit industry. Kapla […]
  • Draft law to regulate foreign NGOs in China could have serious effects for educational exchanges
    A draft law that would require foreign nongovernmental organizations to register their activities with police authorities in China has American universities worried about a chilling effect on educational exchanges of all types. The draft law defines foreign NGOs broadly and is sweeping in its scope, seemingly applying not only to universities that have physi […]
  • Court Orders Chicago State Not to Mess With Faculty Blog
    A federal judge has directed officials at Chicago State University not to interfere with the operations of a faculty blog that has been highly critical of the administration. Chicago State has tried in recent years to shut down or otherwise silence The Faculty Voice, which regularly criticizes university officials. Two faculty members responsible for the blo […]

RSS digalarti

  • Saint-Ex recherche son chargé de mission artfabrique (fab lab) / OFFRE D'EMPLOI
    INTITULE DU POSTE Chargé de mission artfabrique DESCRIPTION DE L’ORGANISME Centre culturel numérique Saint-Exupéry Esplanade André Malraux, Chaussée Bocquaine, 51100 REIMS 03.26.77.41.41 infos@saintex-reims.com // www.saintex-reims.com Lieu atypique de la vie culturelle rémoise, le Centre culturel numérique Saint- Exupéry, association loi 1901, est un espace […]
  • TRANSIENT FESTIVAL 2015 : SOIRÉE D'APPEL À PARTICIPATION
    [APPEL À PROJETS - CRÉATION NUMÉRIQUE / APPEL À BÉNÉVOLAT / INFO / CONCERTS] Le Transient Festival entame sa saison avec une soirée d’appel à participation ouverte à tous.  Sinchromatic lance un appel à projets destiné à la jeune création art numérique pour sélectionner les œuvres qui seront programmées au Transient Festival 2015. Dans le cadre de cet appel […]
  • AADN, fête dix ans d’activisme numérique
    Fort d’une réputation d’expertise, de rassembleur et de fédérateur, l’AADN | Arts et Cultures Numériques dispense aide, conseil et soutien depuis dix ans (en juin), aux initiatives et la création dans le domaine des arts numériques en Rhône-Alpes. Une date importante pour l’association lyonnaise et l’occasion de revenir sur son histoire et ses missions au co […]
  • 28 Festival Les Instants Vidéo Appel à participation 2015
    28eme Festival Les INSTANTS VIDEO 2015 Tu me voulais vierge. Je te voulais moins con. 6 /11 novembre : Rencontres internationales 6/29 novembre : Exposition installations vidéo et numériques APPEL à PARTICIPATION - Date limite: 12 juin 2015 Le festival Les Instants Vidéo est une manifestation dédiée aux arts médiatiques (vidéo et numériques). Chaque année, n […]
  • Appel à projets étudiants // Electroni[k] - Festival Maintenant 2015 - Rennes
    Electroni[k] lance un nouvel appel à projets adressé aux étudiants. Dans le cadre de l’édition 2015 du festival Maintenant qui aura lieu du 9 au 18 octobre, 2 créations d’étudiants seront sélectionnées, produites et présentées : une installation et une performance. Depuis 2001, l’association Electroni[k] explore les croisements entre disciplines, repousse le […]
  • Appel à candidatures pour la résidence Te Ataata offerte à un praticien professionnel français du numérique à Auckland
    L’Ambassade de France en Nouvelle-Zélande et Colab – Auckland University of Technology lancent le premier appel à candidatures pour une résidence de 3 mois au sein de Colab offerte à un praticien professionnel français du numérique. Te Ataata – l’ombre, le reflet, le virtuel en langue maorie – permettra d’accueillir un pensionnaire français en résidence entr […]
  • Appel à projet bar éphémère 2015-2016
          Dans le cadre des projets d’accompagnement et de diffusion, nous lançons un appel à projet pour le baréphémère.   L’appel est ouvert aux artistes, designers, architectes, architectes d’intérieurs…   Un espace convivial. Un lieu de création. Un espace de petite restauration. Un lieu inventif et immersif. Une architecture vive. Donner sens à ce lieu par […]
  • #Call - Appel - Transnumériques #Awards 2015 - Art(s) & Network(s) - Special #GIF - #netart #webart
    Dans le cadre des Transnumériques et de Mons2015, Capitale européenne de la Culture, Transcultures, Centre des cultures numériques, lance un appel à participation pour l’édition 2015 de ses Transnumériques Awards – Art(s) & Network(s). Pour cette édition, Transcultures propose de concentrer ses awards sur le format GIF et ses images animées, le plus souv […]
  • 5ème édition du Garden Talk : comment le numérique métamorphose le marché de l'art
    Le groupe Revolution 9 vous convie  le mardi 20 janvier. à la 5eme édition de la [Garden Talk] sur le thème "Comment le numérique métamorphose le marché de l'art". En compagnie de Yak, Natacha Seignolles et Malo Girod de l'Ain.   […]
  • [Appel à projet] Résidence au Château Éphémère
    Le Château Éphémère est un nouveau lieu de création sonore et numérique à Carrières-sous-Poissy. L'association Caserne Éphémère a réhabilité l'ancien château Vanderbilt qu'elle a équipé spécialement pour offrir un espace de résidence et d'ateliers : lab, studios son et image, ateliers… En septembre, l'ouverture du bar restaurant perm […]

RSS digelarti appel a projet

  • TRANSIENT FESTIVAL 2015 : SOIRÉE D'APPEL À PARTICIPATION
    [APPEL À PROJETS - CRÉATION NUMÉRIQUE / APPEL À BÉNÉVOLAT / INFO / CONCERTS] Le Transient Festival entame sa saison avec une soirée d’appel à participation ouverte à tous.  Sinchromatic lance un appel à projets destiné à la jeune création art numérique pour sélectionner les œuvres qui seront programmées au Transient Festival 2015. Dans le cadre de cet appel […]
  • APPEL À PROJETS / CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS
      Diagonale s'associe à la Biennale Internationale d'Art Numérique (BIAN Montréal) pour sa troisième édition et lance un appel à projets dont les spécificités lieront le mandat du centre et la thématique 2016 de la biennale: AUTOMATA. Les commissaires et les artistes sont invités à soumettre une proposition jusqu'au 2 juin 2015 à minuit. Le pr […]
  • Appel à projets étudiants // Electroni[k] - Festival Maintenant 2015 - Rennes
    Electroni[k] lance un nouvel appel à projets adressé aux étudiants. Dans le cadre de l’édition 2015 du festival Maintenant qui aura lieu du 9 au 18 octobre, 2 créations d’étudiants seront sélectionnées, produites et présentées : une installation et une performance. Depuis 2001, l’association Electroni[k] explore les croisements entre disciplines, repousse le […]
  • Appel à candidatures pour la résidence Te Ataata offerte à un praticien professionnel français du numérique à Auckland
    L’Ambassade de France en Nouvelle-Zélande et Colab – Auckland University of Technology lancent le premier appel à candidatures pour une résidence de 3 mois au sein de Colab offerte à un praticien professionnel français du numérique. Te Ataata – l’ombre, le reflet, le virtuel en langue maorie – permettra d’accueillir un pensionnaire français en résidence entr […]
  • Appel à contribution : City Lights – Festival VIA 2014 - deadline : 08-03
    Le projet évolutif City Lights (Digital Video Windows), initié par l'insitut numediart et déjà été présenté en avril 2013 lors du 175è anniversaire de la Faculté Polytechnique, vise à créer, sur la façade du bâtiment de l’UMONS, rue de Houdain, un espace de mapping architectural ouvert à la participation citoyenne. Numediart, (Institut de recherche pour […]
  • فͤ҈ͥ҉ͦ҈ͧ҉ͨ҈ͩ҉ͪ҈ͫ҉ͬ҈ͭ҉ͮ҈ͯ҉ͨ҈ͬ҉ͧ҈ͣ҉ͨ҈ͧ҉ͯ҈ͮAppel à projets - Mobile Art(s) & Network(s) Awards 2014 - spamm.be - deadline : 10 mars
    Dans le cadre du festival VIA (le manège.mons) et en partenariat avec la Coupole Numérique (regroupement des opérateurs numériques de la région montoise) initié par Mons2015 Capitale européenne de la Culture, Transcultures, Centre des cultures numériques, propose, avec le soutien de Mons 2015, une introduction à la diversité du Net Art via 3 journées consacr […]
  • Sélection de projets Art Numérique en crowdfunding
    En tant que membre "Mentor" de KissKissBankBank, nous soutenons régulièrement des projets liés à l'art, ou parfois plus largement à la création numérique. Voici les récents projets que nous suivons, n'hésitez pas à leur apporter vorte soutien (en contribuant à leur collecte, ou plus simplement, en les partageant à vos contacts). Et si vou […]
  • [appel] Coordonnateur du Prix des arts médiatiques de l'Alliance des Arts Médiatiques Indépendants
    L'Alliance des arts médiatiques indépendants (AAMI) recherche un Coordinateur de son Prix des arts médiatiques, à Montréal (Québec). Afin d'aider dans les domaines de la communication et du développement et de promouvoir l’Alliance des arts médiatiques indépendants et le secteur des arts médiatiques aux donateurs actuels et potentiels, aux bailleur […]
  • Call - Prix Transcultures Mobile "Art(s) en Réseau(x)" 2013 - appel à projets - deadline : 01 sept.
    Dans le cadre de La quinzaine numérique de la Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles (21 septembre > 06 octobre 2013), Transcultures organise, en partenariat avec la Commune de Saint-Gilles (Bruxelles), Les Transnomades 2013 (arts en réseaux), un événement spécialement dédié au Net Art, dans sa diversité innovante. A cette occasion, Transcultures avec ses partenai […]
  • [Appel à projets] Prix Vidéoformes
    Depuis sa création en 1984, Vidéoformes accompagne la video et les arts numériques dans le champ de l'Art contemporain. Une manifestation annuelle, des éditions de DVD, résidences d'artistes, constitutions d'archives… Et des compétitions qui donnent de la visibilité à tous les créateurs, confirmés, underground ou jeunes talents. L'appel p […]