machine quotidienne

Icon

Logic 10.5’s new Drum Machines and Step Sequencer are terrific – here’s how to use them

The Ableton-esque Live Looper in Logic Pro X 10.5 may have gotten all the attention. But don’t miss the Drum Machine Designer, Step Sequencer, and Drum Synths – they turn Logic into a virtual drum machine.

The post Logic 10.5’s new Drum Machines and Step Sequencer are terrific – here’s how to use them appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

There’s a benefit raffle to win rare Moog synths – so let’s luxuriate in Moog memories

It’s a great feeling to support good causes – and, if you’re lucky, walk away with a prize. Let’s use the excuse to marvel at some lesser-known vintage design and queue up some Moog videos. Hey, there are no new shows right now, so here’s our kind of “M”TV.

The post There’s a benefit raffle to win rare Moog synths – so let’s luxuriate in Moog memories appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Check out these wondrous Max for Live synths and other toys from Tilman Ehrhorn

Imagine entering an inspiring electronic music studio and getting free reign to play. Now imagine the price of admission for each synth is the cost of a beer.

The post Check out these wondrous Max for Live synths and other toys from Tilman Ehrhorn appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

SC-808, the SuperCollider TR-808 recreation, now has an Advanced version

The depth and flexibility of insanely powerful platform SuperCollider meets a beautiful recreation of the TR-808 in the “experimental 808,” SC-808. And now it’s available in an expanded Advanced edition.

The post SC-808, the SuperCollider TR-808 recreation, now has an Advanced version appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

No, that isn’t a leak of Ableton Push 3 (details, celebrity comment)

Will there be a future version of Ableton Push following Push 2? Most probably. Is this it? Absolutely not.

The post No, that isn’t a leak of Ableton Push 3 (details, celebrity comment) appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

How to Make Biomass Energy Sustainable Again

From the Neolithic to the beginning of the twentieth century, coppiced woodlands, pollarded trees, and hedgerows provided people with a sustainable supply of energy, materials, and food.

1080px-Wiki_DSC05961_NSG_1433002_Kühkopf-Knoblochsaue

Pollarded trees in Germany. Image: René Schröder (CC BY-SA 4.0).

How is Cutting Down Trees Sustainable?

Advocating for the use of biomass as a renewable source of energy – replacing fossil fuels – has become controversial among environmentalists. The comments on the previous article, which discussed thermoelectric stoves, illustrate this:

  • “As the recent film Planet of the Humans points out, biomass a.k.a. dead trees is not a renewable resource by any means, even though the EU classifies it as such.”
  • “How is cutting down trees sustainable?”
  • “Article fails to mention that a wood stove produces more CO2 than a coal power plant for every ton of wood/coal that is burned.”
  • “This is pure insanity. Burning trees to reduce our carbon footprint is oxymoronic.”
  • “The carbon footprint alone is just horrifying.”
  • “The biggest problem with burning anything is once it’s burned, it’s gone forever.”
  • “The only silly question I can add to to the silliness of this piece, is where is all the wood coming from?”

In contrast to what the comments suggest, the article does not advocate the expansion of biomass as an energy source. Instead, it argues that already burning biomass fires – used by roughly 40% of today’s global population – could also produce electricity as a by-product, if they are outfitted with thermoelectric modules. Nevertheless, several commenters maintained their criticism after they read the article more carefully. One of them wrote: “We should aim to eliminate the burning of biomass globally, not make it more attractive.”

Apparently, high-tech thinking has permeated the minds of (urban) environmentalists to such an extent that they view biomass as an inherently troublesome energy source – similar to fossil fuels. To be clear, critics are right to call out unsustainable practices in biomass production. However, these are the consequences of a relatively recent, “industrial” approach to forestry. When we look at historical forest management practices, it becomes clear that biomass is potentially one of the most sustainable energy sources on this planet.

Coppicing: Harvesting Wood Without Killing Trees

Nowadays, most wood is harvested by killing trees. Before the Industrial Revolution, a lot of wood was harvested from living trees, which were coppiced. The principle of coppicing is based on the natural ability of many broad-leaved species to regrow from damaged stems or roots – damage caused by fire, wind, snow, animals, pathogens, or (on slopes) falling rocks. Coppice management involves the cutting down of trees close to ground level, after which the base – called the “stool” – develops several new shoots, resulting in a multi-stemmed tree.

Image7-hakhoutstoof

A coppice stool. Image: Geert Van der Linden.

Image36Kaapse_Bossen_Eikenhakhout

A recently coppiced patch of oak forest. Image: Henk vD. (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Image32-hakhout-engeland

Coppice stools in Surrey, England. Image: Martinvl (CC BY-SA 4.0)

When we think of a forest or a tree plantation, we imagine it as a landscape stacked with tall trees. However, until the beginning of the twentieth century, at least half of the forests in Europe were coppiced, giving them a more bush-like appearance. [1] The coppicing of trees can be dated back to the stone age, when people built pile dwellings and trackways crossing prehistoric fenlands using thousands of branches of equal size – a feat that can only be accomplished by coppicing. [2]

Coppice-forests-czech-republic

Historical-coppice-forests-spain

The approximate historical range of coppice forests in the Czech Republic (above, in red) and in Spain (below, in blue). Source: “Coppice forests in Europe”, see [1]

Ever since then, the technique formed the standard approach to wood production – not just in Europe but almost all over the world. Coppicing expanded greatly during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, when population growth and the rise of industrial activity (glass, iron, tile and lime manufacturing) put increasing pressure on wood reserves.

Short Rotation Cycles

Because the young shoots of a coppiced tree can exploit an already well-developed root system, a coppiced tree produces wood faster than a tall tree. Or, to be more precise: although its photosynthetic efficiency is the same, a tall tree provides more biomass below ground (in the roots) while a coppiced tree produces more biomass above ground (in the shoots) – which is clearly more practical for harvesting. [3] Partly because of this, coppicing was based on short rotation cycles, often of around two to four years, although both yearly rotations and rotations up to 12 years or longer also occurred.

Image3-rijshoutaanplantingen

Image13-hakhoutpercelen

Coppice stools with different rotation cycles. Images: Geert Van der Linden. 

Because of the short rotation cycles, a coppice forest was a very quick, regular and reliable supplier of firewood. Often, it was cut up into a number of equal compartments that corresponded to the number of years in the planned rotation. For example, if the shoots were harvested every three years, the forest was divided into three parts, and one of these was coppiced each year. Short rotation cycles also meant that it took only a few years before the carbon released by the burning of the wood was compensated by the carbon that was absorbed by new growth, making a coppice forest truly carbon neutral. In very short rotation cycles, new growth could even be ready for harvest by the time the old growth wood had dried enough to be burned.

In some tree species, the stump sprouting ability decreases with age. After several rotations, these trees were either harvested in their entirety and replaced by new trees, or converted into a coppice with a longer rotation. Other tree species resprout well from stumps of all ages, and can provide shoots for centuries, especially on rich soils with a good water supply. Surviving coppice stools can be more than 1,000 years old.

Biodiversity

A coppice can be called a “coppice forest” or a “coppice plantation”, but in reality it was neither a forest nor a plantation – perhaps something in between. Although managed by humans, coppice forests were not environmentally destructive, on the contrary. Harvesting wood from living trees instead of killing them is beneficial for the life forms that depend on them. Coppice forests can have a richer biodiversity than unmanaged forests, because they always contain areas with different stages of light and growth. None of this is true in industrial wood plantations, which support little or no plant and animal life, and which have longer rotation cycles (of at least twenty years).

Image35.ash-coppice

Coppice stools in the Netherlands. Image: K. Vliet (CC BY-SA 4.0)

Flexham_coppice_bluebells

Sweet chestnut coppice at Flexham Park, Sussex, England. Image: Charlesdrakew, public domain.

Our forebears also cut down tall, standing trees with large-diameter stems – just not for firewood. Large trees were only “killed” when large timber was required, for example for the construction of ships, buildings, bridges, and windmills. [4] Coppice forests could contain tall trees (a “coppice-with-standards”), which were left to grow for decades while the surrounding trees were regularly pruned. However, even these standing trees could be partly coppiced, for example by harvesting their side branches while they were alive (shredding).

Multipurpose Trees

The archetypical wood plantation promoted by the industrial world involves regularly spaced rows of trees in even-aged, monocultural stands, providing a single output – timber for construction, pulpwood for paper production, or fuelwood for power plants. In contrast, trees in pre-industrial coppice forests had multiple purposes. They provided firewood, but also construction materials and animal fodder.

The targeted wood dimensions, determined by the use of the shoots, set the rotation period of the coppice. Because not every type of wood was suited for every type of use, coppiced forests often consisted of a variety of tree species at different ages. Several age classes of stems could even be rotated on the same coppice stool (“selection coppice”), and the rotations could evolve over time according to the needs and priorities of the economic activities.

Image18-geriefhoutbos

A small woodland with a diverse mix of coppiced, pollarded and standard trees. Image: Geert Van der Linden.  

Coppiced wood was used to build almost anything that was needed in a community. [5] For example, young willow shoots, which are very flexible, were braided into baskets and crates, while sweet chestnut prunings, which do not expand or shrink after drying, were used to make all kinds of barrels. Ash and goat willow, which yield straight and sturdy wood, provided the material for making the handles of brooms, axes, shovels, rakes and other tools.

Young hazel shoots were split along the entire length, braided between the wooden beams of buildings, and then sealed with loam and cow manure – the so-called wattle-and-daub construction. Hazel shoots also kept thatched roofs together. Alder and willow, which have almost limitless life expectancy under water, were used as foundation piles and river bank reinforcements. The construction wood that was taken out of a coppice forest did not diminish its energy supply: because the artefacts were often used locally, at the end of their lives they could still be burned as firewood.

Harvesting-leaf-fodder

Harvesting leaf fodder in Leikanger kommune, Norway. Image: Leif Hauge. Source: [19]

Coppice forests also supplied food. On the one hand, they provided people with fruits, berries, truffles, nuts, mushrooms, herbs, honey, and game. On the other hand, they were an important source of winter fodder for farm animals. Before the Industrial Revolution, many sheep and goats were fed with so-called “leaf fodder” or “leaf hay” – leaves with or without twigs. [6]

Elm and ash were among the most nutritious species, but sheep also got birch, hazel, linden, bird cherry and even oak, while goats were also fed with alder. In mountainous regions, horses, cattle, pigs and silk worms could be given leaf hay too. Leaf fodder was grown in rotations of three to six years, when the branches provided the highest ratio of leaves to wood. When the leaves were eaten by the animals, the wood could still be burned.

Pollards & Hedgerows

Coppice stools are vulnerable to grazing animals, especially when the shoots are young. Therefore, coppice forests were usually protected against animals by building a ditch, fence or hedge around them. In contrast, pollarding allowed animals and trees to be mixed on the same land. Pollarded trees were pruned like coppices, but to a height of at least two metres to keep the young shoots out of reach of grazing animals.

Coppicing-methods

Fresneda Añe  Segovia

Pollarded trees in Segovia, Spain. Image: Ecologistas en Acción.

Wooded meadows and wood pastures – mosaics of pasture and forest – combined the grazing of animals with the production of fodder, firewood and/or construction wood from pollarded trees. “Pannage” or “mast feeding” was the method of sending pigs into pollarded oak forests during autumn, where they could feed on fallen acorns. The system formed the mainstay of pork production in Europe for centuries. [7] The “meadow orchard” or “grazed orchard” combined fruit cultivation and grazing — pollarded fruit trees offered shade to the animals, while the animals could not reach the fruit but fertilised the trees.

959px-Aracena_-_Paisaje_01

Forest or pasture? Something in between. A “dehesa” (pig forest farm) in Spain. Image by Basotxerri (CC BY-SA 4.0).

960px-Dehesa_Boyal._Bollullos_Par_del_Condado_(Huelva)

Cattle grazes among pollarded trees in Huelva, Spain. (CC BY-SA 2.5)

Image16-veekeringslaag

A meadow orchard surrounded by a living hedge in Rijkhoven, Belgium. Image: Geert Van der Linden.

While agriculture and forestry are now strictly separated activities, in earlier times the farm was the forest and vice versa. It would make a lot of sense to bring them back together, because agriculture and livestock production – not wood production – are the main drivers of deforestation. If trees provide animal fodder, meat and dairy production should not lead to deforestation. If crops can be grown in fields with trees, agriculture should not lead to deforestation. Forest farms would also improve animal welfare, soil fertility and erosion control.

Line Plantings

Extensive plantations could consist of coppiced or pollarded trees, and were often managed as a commons. However, coppicing and pollarding were not techniques seen only in large-scale forest management. Small woodlands in between fields or next to a rural house and managed by an individual household would be coppiced or pollarded. A lot of wood was also grown as line plantings around farmyards, fields and meadows, near buildings, and along paths, roads and waterways. Here, lopped trees and shrubs could also appear in the form of hedgerows, thickly planted hedges. A lot of wood was thus grown outside “forests” or “plantations”. [8]

989px-Bocage_country_at_Cotentin_Peninsula

Hedge landscape in Normandy, France, around 1940. Image: W Wolny, public domain.

Heggenlandschap-meetjesland-image20

Line plantings in Flanders, Belgium. Detail from the Ferraris map, 1771-78. 

Although line plantings are usually associated with the use of hedgerows in England, they were common in large parts of Europe. In 1804, English historian Abbé Mann expressed his surprise when he wrote about his trip to Flanders (today part of Belgium): “All fields are enclosed with hedges, and thick set with trees, insomuch that the whole face of the country, seen from a little height, seems one continued wood”. Typical for the region was the large number of pollarded trees. [8]

Like coppice forests, line plantings were diverse and provided people with firewood, construction materials and leaf fodder. However, unlike coppice forests, they had extra functions because of their specific location. [9] One of these was plot separation: keeping farm animals in, and keeping wild animals or cattle grazing on common lands out. Various techniques existed to make hedgerows impenetrable, even for small animals such as rabbits. Around meadows, hedgerows or rows of very closely planted pollarded trees (“pollarded tree hedges”) could stop large animals such as cows. If willow wicker was braided between them, such a line planting could also keep small animals out. [8]

Detail-taxushaag-image23

Detail of a yew hedge. Image: Geert Van der Linden. 

Gelegde-meidoornhaag-image25

Hedgerow. Image: Geert Van der Linden. 

Image11-kaphaag

Pollarded tree hedge in Nieuwekerken, Belgium. Image: Geert Van der Linden.

Image26-hakhoutstoven

Coppice stools in a pasture. Image: Jan Bastiaens.

Trees and line plantings also offered protection against the weather. Line plantings protected fields, orchards and vegetable gardens against the wind, which could erode the soil and damage the crops. In warmer climates, trees could shield crops from the sun and fertilize the soil. Pollarded lime trees, which have very dense foliage, were often planted right next to wattle-and-daub buildings in order to protect them from wind, rain and sun. [10]

Dunghills were protected by one or more trees, preventing the valuable resource from evaporating due to sun or wind. In the yard of a watermill, the wooden water wheel was shielded by a tree to prevent the wood from shrinking or expanding in times of drought or inactivity. [8]

Image5-taxus-schermbeplanting-watermolen

A pollarded yew tree protects a water wheel. Image: Geert Van der Linden. 

Image15-lindenrij

Pollarded lime trees protect a farm building in Nederbrakel, Belgium. Image: Geert Van der Linden.

Location Matters

Along paths, roads and waterways, line plantings had many of the same location-specific functions as on farms. Cattle and pigs were hoarded over dedicated droveways lined with hedgerows, coppices and/or pollards. When the railroads appeared, line plantings prevented collisions with animals. They protected road travellers from the weather, and marked the route so that people and animals would not get off the road in a snowy landscape. They prevented soil erosion at riverbanks and hollow roads.

All functions of line plantings could be managed by dead wood fences, which can be moved more easily than hedgerows, take up less space, don’t compete for light and food with crops, and can be ready in a short time. [11] However, in times and places were wood was scarce a living hedge was often preferred (and sometimes obliged) because it was a continuous wood producer, while a dead wood fence was a continuous wood consumer. A dead wood fence may save space and time on the spot, but it implies that the wood for its construction and maintenance is grown and harvested elsewhere in the surroundings.

Image12-kaphaag

Image: Pollarded tree hedge in Belgium. Image: Geert Van der Linden.

Local use of wood resources was maximised. For example, the tree that was planted next to the waterwheel, was not just any tree. It was red dogwood or elm, the wood that was best suited for constructing the interior gearwork of the mill. When a new part was needed for repairs, the wood could be harvested right next to the mill. Likewise, line plantings along dirt roads were used for the maintenance of those roads. The shoots were tied together in bundles and used as a foundation or to fill up holes. Because the trees were coppiced or pollarded and not cut down, no function was ever at the expense of another.

Nowadays, when people advocate for the planting of trees, targets are set in terms of forested area or the number of trees, and little attention is given to their location – which could even be on the other side of the world. However, as these examples show, planting trees closeby and in the right location can significantly optimise their potential.

Shaped by Limits

Coppicing has largely disappeared in industrial societies, although pollarded trees can still be found along streets and in parks. Their prunings, which once sustained entire communities, are now considered waste products. If it worked so well, why was coppicing abandoned as a source of energy, materials and food? The answer is short: fossil fuels. Our forebears relied on coppice because they had no access to fossil fuels, and we don’t rely on coppice because we have.

Our forebears relied on coppice because they had no access to fossil fuels, and we don’t rely on coppice because we have

Most obviously, fossil fuels have replaced wood as a source of energy and materials. Coal, gas and oil took the place of firewood for cooking, space heating, water heating and industrial processes based on thermal energy. Metal, concrete and brick – materials that had been around for many centuries – only became widespread alternatives to wood after they could be made with fossil fuels, which also brought us plastics. Artificial fertilizers – products of fossil fuels – boosted the supply and the global trade of animal fodder, making leaf fodder obsolete. The mechanisation of agriculture – driven by fossil fuels – led to farming on much larger plots along with the elimination of trees and line plantings on farms.

Less obvious, but at least as important, is that fossil fuels have transformed forestry itself. Nowadays, the harvesting, processing and transporting of wood is heavily supported by the use of fossil fuels, while in earlier times they were entirely based on human and animal power – which themselves get their fuel from biomass. It was the limitations of these power sources that created and shaped coppice management all over the world.

855px-Het_knotten_van_wilgen_in_het_land_van_Maas_en_Waal _Bestanddeelnr_902-0686

Harvesting wood from pollarded trees in Belgium, 1947. Credit: Zeylemaker, Co., Nationaal Archief (CCO)

Pollarding-in-the-past

Transporting firewood in the Basque Country. Source: Notes on pollards: best practices’ guide for pollarding. Gipuzkoaka Foru Aldundía-Diputación Foral de Giuzkoa, 2014.

Wood was harvested and processed by hand, using simple tools such as knives, machetes, billhooks, axes and (later) saws. Because the labour requirements of harvesting trees by hand increase with stem diameter, it was cheaper and more convenient to harvest many small branches instead of cutting down a few large trees. Furthermore, there was no need to split coppiced wood after it was harvested. Shoots were cut to a length of around one metre, and tied together in “faggots”, which were an easy size to handle manually.

It was the limitations of human and animal power that created and shaped coppice management all over the world

To transport firewood, our forebears relied on animal drawn carts over often very bad roads. This meant that, unless it could be transported over water, firewood had to be harvested within a radius of at most 15-30 km from the place where it was used. [12] Beyond those distances, the animal power required for transporting the firewood was larger than its energy content, and it would have made more sense to grow firewood on the pasture that fed the draft animal. [13] There were some exceptions to this rule. Some industrial activities, like iron and potash production, could be moved to more distant forests – transporting iron or potash was more economical than transporting the firewood required for their production. However, in general, coppice forests (and of course also line plantings) were located in the immediate vicinity of the settlement where the wood was used.

In short, coppicing appeared in a context of limits. Because of its faster growth and versatile use of space, it maximised the local wood supply of a given area. Because of its use of small branches, it made manual harvesting and transporting as economical and convenient as possible.

Can Coppicing be Mechanised?

From the twentieth century onwards, harvesting was done by motor saw, and since the 1980s, wood is increasingly harvested by powerful vehicles that can fell entire trees and cut them on the spot in a matter of minutes. Fossil fuels have also brought better transportation infrastructures, which have unlocked wood reserves that were inaccessible in earlier times. Consequently, firewood can now be grown on one side of the planet and consumed at the other.

The use of fossil fuels adds carbon emissions to what used to be a completely carbon neutral activity, but much more important is that it has pushed wood production to a larger – unsustainable – scale. [14] Fossil fueled transportation has destroyed the connection between supply and demand that governed local forestry. If the wood supply is limited, a community has no other choice than to make sure that the wood harvest rate and the wood renewal rate are in balance. Otherwise, it risks running out of fuelwood, craft wood and animal fodder, and it would be abandoned.

Mechanical-harvesting-coppice

Mechanically harvested willow coppice plantation. Shortly after coppicing (right), 3-years old growth (left). Image: Lignovis GmbH (CC BY-SA 4.0). 

Likewise, fully mechanised harvesting has pushed forestry to a scale that is incompatible with sustainable forest management. Our forebears did not cut down large trees for firewood, because it was not economical. Today, the forest industry does exactly that because mechanisation makes it the most profitable thing to do. Compared to industrial forestry, where one worker can harvest up to 60 m3 of wood per hour, coppicing is extremely labour-intensive. Consequently, it cannot compete in an economic system that fosters the replacement of human labour with machines powered by fossil fuels.

Coppicing cannot compete in an economic system that fosters the replacement of human labour with machines powered by fossil fuels

Some scientists and engineers have tried to solve this by demonstrating coppice harvesting machines. [15] However, mechanisation is a slippery slope. The machines are only practical and economical on somewhat larger tracts of woodland (>1 ha) which contain coppiced trees of the same species and the same age, with only one purpose (often fuelwood for power generation). As we have seen, this excludes many older forms of coppice management, such as the use of multipurpose trees and line plantings. Add fossil fueled transportation to the mix, and the result is a type of industrial coppice management that brings few improvements.

Image17-vastleggingshaag

Coppiced trees along a brook in ‘s Gravenvoeren, Belgium. Image: Geert Van der Linden. 

Sustainable forest management is essentially local and manual. This doesn’t mean that we need to copy the past to make biomass energy sustainable again. For example, the radius of the wood supply could be increased by low energy transport options, such as cargo bikes and aerial ropeways, which are much more efficient than horse or ox drawn carts over bad roads, and which could be operated without fossil fuels. Hand tools have also improved in terms of efficiency and ergonomics. We could even use motor saws that run on biofuels – a much more realistic application than their use in car engines. [16]

The Past Lives On

This article has compared industrial biomass production with historical forms of forest management in Europe, but in fact there was no need to look to the past for inspiration. The 40% of the global population consisting of people in poor societies that still burn wood for cooking and water and/or space heating, are no clients of industrial forestry. Instead, they obtain firewood in much of the same ways that we did in earlier times, although the tree species and the environmental conditions can be very different. [17]

A 2017 study calculated that the wood consumption by people in “developing” societies – good for 55% of the global wood harvest and 9-15% of total global energy consumption – only causes 2-8% of anthropogenic climate impacts. [18] Why so little? Because around two-thirds of the wood that is harvested in developing societies is harvested sustainably, write the scientists. People collect mainly dead wood, they grow a lot of wood outside the forest, they coppice and pollard trees, and they prefer the use of multipurpose trees, which are too valuable to cut down. The motives are the same as those of our ancestors: people have no access to fossil fuels and are thus tied to a local wood supply, which needs to be harvested and transported manually.

AFRICAN_WOMEN_CARRING_FIREWOOD

African women carrying firewood. (CC BY-SA 4.0)

These numbers confirm that it is not biomass energy that’s unsustainable. If the whole of humanity would live as the 40% that still burns biomass regularly, climate change would not be an issue. What is really unsustainable is a high energy lifestyle. We can obviously not sustain a high-tech industrial society on coppice forests and line plantings alone. But the same is true for any other energy source, including uranium and fossil fuels. 

Written by Kris De Decker. Proofread by Alice Essam. 

Subscribe to our newsletter.
* Support Low-tech Magazine via Paypal or Patreon.
Buy the printed website.


References: 

[1] Multiple references:

Unrau, Alicia, et al. Coppice forests in Europe. University of Freiburg, 2018. 

Notes on pollards: best practices’ guide for pollarding. Gipuzkoako Foru Aldundia-Diputación Foral de Gipuzkoa, 2014.

A study of practical pollarding techniques in Northern Europe. Report of a three month study tour August to November 2003, Helen J. Read.

Aarden wallen in Europa, in “Tot hier en niet verder: historische wallen in het Nederlandse landschap”, Henk Baas, Bert Groenewoudt, Pim Jungerius and Hans Renes, Rijksdienst voor het Cultureel Erfgoed, 2012.

[2] Logan, William Bryant. Sprout lands: tending the endless gift of trees. WW Norton & Company, 2019.

[3] Holišová, Petra, et al. “Comparison of assimilation parameters of coppiced and non-coppiced sessile oaks“. Forest-Biogeosciences and Forestry 9.4 (2016): 553. 

[4] Perlin, John. A forest journey: the story of wood and civilization. The Countryman Press, 2005.

[5] Most of this information comes from a Belgian publication (in Dutch language): Handleiding voor het inventariseren van houten beplantingen met erfgoedwaarde. Geert Van der Linden, Nele Vanmaele, Koen Smets en Annelies Schepens, Agentschap Onroerend Erfgoed, 2020. For a good (but concise) reference in English, see Rotherham, Ian. Ancient Woodland: history, industry and crafts. Bloomsbury Publishing, 2013.

[6] While leaf fodder was used all over Europe, it was especially widespread in mountainous regions, such as Scandinavia, the Alps and the Pyrenees. For example, in Sweden in 1850, 1.3 million sheep and goats consumed a total of 190 million sheaves annually, for which at least 1 million hectares deciduous woodland was exploited, often in the form of pollards. The harvest of leaf fodder predates the use of hay as winter fodder. Branches could be cut with stone tools, while cutting grass requires bronze or iron tools. While most coppicing and pollarding was done in winter, harvesting leaf fodder logically happened in summer. Bundles of leaf fodder were often put in the pollarded trees to dry. References: 

Logan, William Bryant. Sprout lands: tending the endless gift of trees. WW Norton & Company, 2019.

A study of practical pollarding techniques in Northern Europe. Report of a three month study tour August to November 2003, Helen J. Read.

Slotte H., “Harvesting of leaf hay shaped the Swedish landscape“, Landscape Ecology 16.8 (2001): 691-702. 

[7] Wealleans, Alexandra L. “Such as pigs eat: the rise and fall of the pannage pig in the UK“. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 93.9 (2013): 2076-2083.

[8] This information is based on several Dutch language publications: 

Handleiding voor het inventariseren van houten beplantingen met erfgoedwaarde. Geert Van der Linden, Nele Vanmaele, Koen Smets en Annelies Schepens, Agentschap Onroerend Erfgoed, 2020.

Handleiding voor het beheer van hagen en houtkanten met erfgoedwaarde. Thomas Van Driessche, Agentschap Onroerend Erfgoed, 2019

Knotbomen, knoestige knapen: een praktische gids. Geert Van der Linden, Jos Schenk, Bert Geeraerts, Provincie Vlaams-Brabant, 2017.

Handleiding: Het beheer van historische dreven en wegbeplantingen. Thomas Van Driessche, Paul Van den Bremt and Koen Smets. Agentschap Onroerend Erfgoed, 2017.

Dirkmaat, Jaap. Nederland weer mooi: op weg naar een natuurlijk en idyllisch landschap. ANWB Media-Boeken & Gidsen, 2006.

For a good source in English, see: Müller, Georg. Europe’s Field Boundaries: Hedged banks, hedgerows, field walls (stone walls, dry stone walls), dead brushwood hedges, bent hedges, woven hedges, wattle fences and traditional wooden fences. Neuer Kunstverlag, 2013.

If line plantings were mainly used for wood production, they were planted at some distance from each other, allowing more light and thus a higher wood production. If they were mainly used as plot boundaries, they were planted more closely together. This diminished the wood harvest but allowed for a thicker growth.

[9] In fact, coppice forests could also have a location-specific function: they could be placed around a city or settlement to form an impenetrable obstacle for attackers, either by foot or by horse. They could not easily be destroyed by shooting, in contrast to a wall. Source: [5]

[10] Lime trees were even used for fire prevention. They were planted right next to the baking house in order to stop the spread of sparks to wood piles, haystacks and thatched roofs. Source: [5]

[11]  The fact that living hedges and trees are easier to move than dead wood fences and posts also has practical advantages. In Europe until the French era, there was no land register and boundaries where physically indicated in the landscape. The surveyor’s work was sealed with the planting of a tree, which is much harder to move on the sly than a pole or a fence. Source: [5]

[12] And, if it could be brought in over water from longer distances, the wood had to be harvested within 15-30 km of the river or coast. 

[13] Sieferle, Rolf Pieter. The Subterranean Forest: energy systems and the industrial revolution. White Horse Press, 2001.

[14] On different scales of wood production, see also: 

Jalas, Mikko, and Jenny, Rinkinen. “Stacking wood and staying warm: time, temporality and housework around domestic heating systems“, Journal of Consumer Culture 16.1 (2016): 43-60.

Rinkinen, Jenny. “Demanding energy in everyday life: insights from wood heating into theories of social practice.” (2015).

[15] Vanbeveren, S.P.P., et al. “Operational short rotation woody crop plantations: manual or mechanised harvesting?” Biomass and Bioenergy 72 (2015): 8-18.

[16] However, chainsaws can have adverse effects on some tree species, such as reduced growth or greater ability to transfer disease. 

[17] Multiple sources that refer to traditional forestry practices in Africa:

Leach, Gerald, and Robin Mearns. Beyond the woodfuel crisis: people, land and trees in Africa. Earthscan, 1988. 

Leach, Melissa, and Robin Mearns. “The lie of the land: challenging received wisdom on the African environment.” (1998)

Cline-Cole, Reginald A. “Political economy, fuelwood relations, and vegetation conservation: Kasar Kano, Northerm Nigeria, 1850-1915.” Forest & Conservation History 38.2 (1994): 67-78.

[18] Multiple references:

Bailis, Rob, et al. “Getting the number right: revisiting woodfuel sustainability in the developing world.” Environmental Research Letters 12.11 (2017): 115002

Masera, Omar R., et al. “Environmental burden of traditional bioenergy use.” Annual Review of Environment and Resources 40 (2015): 121-150.

Study downgrades climate impact of wood burning, John Upton, Climate Central, 2015.

[19] Haustingsskog. [revidert] Rettleiar for restaurering og skjøtsel, Garnås, Ingvill; Hauge, Leif ; Svalheim, Ellen, NIBIO RAPPORT | VOL. 4 | NR. 150 | 2018. 

MTL+ : 14 projets urbains innovants pour 2067 | Georges Adamczyk (#8) et Albert Mondor (#9)

Kollectif a collaboré avec La Biosphère, Musée de l’environnement pour sa dernière exposition permanente, MTL+, qui met en scène les projets de 14 groupes d’architectes montréalais. Chacun réinvente une vaste infrastructure de la ville dans une exposition qui est un rare hommage à l’architecture et à l’urbanisme dans un musée dédié aux questions environnementales.

Le musée a demandé aux architectes d’imaginer à quoi ressemblerait la ville dans 50 ans. Plus précisément, on leur a demandé de choisir des infrastructures qui seraient devenues vétustes en 2067. Certains s’aventurent dans des propositions philosophiques, d’autres dans des propositions très techniques et ceci donne un panorama de ce qui constitue la réflexion architecturale d’aujourd’hui.

En accompagnement à l’exposition, Kollectif a réalisé 14 vidéos qui permettent de mettre un visage sur les architectes derrière ces 14 projets. Ces vidéos sont notamment présentées en français et en anglais dans une borne interactive à même la salle d’exposition de la Biosphère.

Dans une vidéo introductive, l’architecte Philippe Lupien présente le concept de MTL+ :

L’appel à idées lancé par le musée s’inscrit dans une démarche d’innovation des plus flexibles et interdisciplinaires possible. Le musée a demandé aux firmes invitées de collaborer avec des experts d’horizons différents dans l’objectif était de stimuler l’imagination et de libérer la créativité afin de faire naître de nouveaux grands projets urbains. En organisant cette exposition, la Biosphère souhaitait que les visiteurs retournent chez eux en ayant l’impression que la société est capable — ne serait-ce que par son pouvoir de projection dans l’avenir et de formulation d’idéaux — de prévoir des milieux de vie plus écoresponsables.

L’institution invite au dialogue entre science, culture et environnement depuis 25 ans. Au cours des années, le génie humain et la cohabitation avec l’environnement naturel sont l’essence même de toutes les activités de la Biosphère. L’exposition «?MTL+?», en rendant hommage aux architectes visionnaires qui nous aideront à bâtir l’avenir, fait aussi un clin d’œil à R. B. Fuller, concepteur de la Biosphère et l’un des pères de la pensée environnementale contemporaine. Ce qui rassemble les projets «?MTL+?», c’est l’espoir qu’ils inspirent un avenir meilleur basé sur le respect de l’environnement.

unnamed

 

** À noter les vidéos ci-dessous apparaîtront progressivement dans les prochaines semaines, suivant nos publications sur les réseaux sociaux.

 

David Giraldeau
PARA-SOL?

Promenade fluviale sur la voie maritime
13 km d’aménagements axés sur la santé, le plein air et la contemplation

En 2067, la population de la région montréalaise est si sérieuse et les besoins pour de nouveaux espaces publics si grands que le site s’est entièrement renouvelé. Les Montréalais peuvent dorénavant se détendre sur les rives du fleuve, où le plan d’eau est à son plus large. En collaboration avec l’entrepreneur Felix-Antoine Joli-Coeur, Para-Sol propose une requalification de la bande de terre localisée le long de la voie maritime entre le pont Victoria et l’écluse de Sainte-Catherine. La firme suggère un ruban terrestre de 13 km d’installations axées sur la santé, le plein air et la contemplation. Les citoyens et résidents de l’endroit accèdent au site rapidement et sans voiture et la digue est aménagée à la manière des promenades de bord de mer.

 

Juliette Patterson
CATALYSE URBAINE?

Grenouilles et graminées
Station d’épuration pour le Montréal de demain

Dans 50 ans, les eaux usées ne sont plus acheminées vers l’actuelle centrale d’épuration des eaux de Montréal. Elles sont nettoyées grâce à d’immenses marais filtrants. Ces eaux sont acheminées par gravité au point bas de la ville et proviennent du centre-ville et du quartier Pointe-Saint-Charles. Les marais d’épuration sont situés entre les ponts Champlain et Victoria. Ces bassins végétalisés y nettoient les eaux usées par l’action combinée des plantes, du vent et du soleil. L’autoroute, qui empêchait l’accès à la rive, est remplacée par une grande promenade riveraine. Un nouveau quartier s’articule autour d’une promenade verte centrale favorable à la biodiversité.

Réalisé en collaboration avec Claire Merckaert, ingénieure.

 

Gavin Affleck
AFFLECK DE LA RIVA

Mens sana in corpore sano
Parc de métaconsience au centre du fleuve

Dans ce scénario franchement utopiste réalisé en collaboration avec le géologue Michel Jébrak, un nouveau parc a pris forme. Il offre un lieu de ressourcement et de partage où l’énergie vitale de l’eau alimente le corps et l’esprit. Le Montréal de 2067 est sain physiquement et mentalement. La proposition repose sur l’hypothèse selon laquelle le 22e siècle est marqué par une découverte qui révolutionne notre compréhension du monde : la métaconscience et son développement et transmission dans l’eau. Un esprit sain dans un… fleuve sain !

 

Guillaume Éthier
(pour)? ARCHITECTURE MICROCLIMAT

L’échangeur
Espace de déconnexion attaché à une station de métro

Pour Architecture Microclimat, la pause n’est pas un luxe, mais une obligation de santé publique ! Les autorités fournissent des occasions de déconnexion numérique aux citoyens. Tant mieux, car en 2067, la technologie a conquis l’espace urbain et les citadins sont suivis dans chacun de leurs gestes au quotidien par les multiples systèmes d’une métropole hyperconnectée qui ne leur laisse aucun répit. Ceci prend la forme de lieux où les individus peuvent se recentrer ou échanger entre eux en toute simplicité, sans interfaces numériques et sans avalanches de données.

 

Hubert Pelletier
PELLETIER DE FONTENAY

Zones naturelles d’exclusion humaine (ZNEH)
Nouvel espace réservé à la nature au cœur de la ville

Dans un monde imaginaire, Pelletier de Fontenay et le biologiste Mathieu Madison imaginent que des critères de sélection ont permis aux urbanistes (dès 2022 !) de cerner les territoires idéaux pour établir de véritables forêts urbaines au cœur de la métropole. Les terrains choisis étaient mal aménagés, trop asphaltés ou mal gazonnés. Il s’agissait aussi de lieux dont la vocation était vouée à disparaître ou qui n’offraient plus de valeur sociale. Le cas des centres commerciaux vient tout de suite à l’esprit. Ceux-ci sont disparus depuis l’apparition de nouveaux modes de consommation (on est en 2067, rappelez-vous) ! On met donc de l’avant le concept très critiqué de « Zones naturelles d’exclusion humaine » ou « ZNHE ».

 

Randy Cohen
ATELIER BIG CITY

Montréal est une merveilleuse promenade
Espace de mobilité où il fait bon vivre

En collaboration avec l’entrepreneur montréalais Alexandre Taillefer, Big City réinvente un lieu de passage très fréquenté à Montréal et imagine un espace de mobilité où il fait bon vivre. L’infrastructure routière peu conviviale qu’est la rue Berri entre les rues Ontario et Cherrier n’est plus la même en 2067. L’artère avait d’abord été pensée pour le passage des voitures entre le centre-ville et le quartier du Plateau Mont?Royal, mais, dans le Montréal de demain, une nouvelle place, sur la rue Cherrier, domine cette zone et embellit le parcours menant du carré Saint-Louis au parc Lafontaine — deux lieux toujours très fréquentés par les Montréalais.

 

Peter Soland
CIVILITI

Libérer la rue
Réinvention à grande échelle de rues et de ruelles

Peter Soland explique comment son équipe a été amenée à requalifier la « trame urbaine » à grande échelle : les rues et ruelles du Plateau-Mont-Royal. Essentiellement, c’est une opération de déminéralisation qui a été effectuée. C’est dans ce contexte que la rue devient, peu à peu, un véritable milieu de vie pour les citoyens. Si des corridors minimaux ont été maintenus pour les véhicules d’urgence, le bitume a graduellement fait place à des boisés, à des prés, et même à des milieux humides.

Réalisé en collaboration avec Carmela Cucuzzella, professeur en design.

 

Georges Adamczyk
(pour)?STUDIO JEAN VERVILLE?

Prochaine station
Requalification du territoire ferroviaire entre deux quartiers limitrophes

L’équipe de Studio Jean Verville voit à la requalification du territoire ferroviaire entre deux quartiers limitrophes. Un long tracé de chemin de fer impose une infranchissable frontière entre deux communautés qui ont pourtant tout à partager. La mise en place d’un train suspendu à sustentation magnétique permet de fusionner les deux quartiers. L’utilisation du couloir aérien permet non seulement de conserver cette importante artère de flux de marchandises, mais aussi d’activer une nouvelle ligne de transport de passagers.

Réalisé en collaboration avec la géographe Nathalie Molines.

 

Albert Mondor
CONSORTIUM VERT L’AVENIR

Métropoligne 40
Grands potagers et vergers sur une autoroute urbaine

Albert Mondor explique pourquoi son équipe en est venue à proposer une requalification complète de la portion de l’autoroute transcanadienne entre les boulevards Saint-Laurent et Pie-IX. Le lieu devient vergers et potagers géants sur une autoroute urbaine futuriste. Pour recréer ce grand jardin, en plus de végétaux nectarifères attirant les insectes pollinisateurs, diverses plantes légumières et fruitières sont massivement cultivées. Un marché public où sont vendues les denrées comestibles produites localement est ouvert à l’année.

Réalisé en collaboration avec l’horticulteur Bertrand Dumont.

 

Antonio Di Bacco
ATELIER BARDA

Figure-fond
Interprétation de la carrière Francon

L’équipe a travaillé avec un philosophe allemand, Rafael Ziegler. Celui-ci décrit le projet avec lyrisme : «?Chérissez l’eau?; ses flots vous entraîneront dans une ancienne friche industrielle, où le roc offre tranquillité et régénération.?» Atelier Barda réinterprète la carrière Francon. En 2067, des bassins filtrent les eaux usées de ce secteur de la ville. Leur circuit de purification, visible et accessible, offre aux citoyens des plans d’eaux qui favorisent la détente et les loisirs, y compris la baignade. L’eau est filtrée à travers une succession de plateaux. Des zones de sédimentation, de filtration et de lagunage remplacent le système de gestion des eaux usées.

 

Pierre-Yves Diehl
COLLECTIF ESCARGO?

Le laboratoire des lucioles
Réintroduction de la vie sur un site industriel

Le « laboratoire des lucioles » est la réinvention complète des raffineries de l’est (Pointe-aux-Trembles sur l’ile de Montréal). L’objectif: y réintroduire la vie. En collaboration avec la géographe Taika Baillargeon, Collectif Escargo propose un parc de 21 km2 qui devient en 2067 un immense laboratoire sur la biolumiscence et qui comporte aussi des espaces culturels. Comme le pétrole n’est presque plus utilisé en 2067, l’immense complexe pétrochimique a été délaissé. Et le réaménagement du territoire s’est fait dans le respect de ce patrimoine industriel où s’enchevêtrent des milliers de kilomètres de pompes et d’oléoducs.

 

Gil Hardy
NÓS

Espaces de liberté
Requalification de berges industrielles au profit du mouvement de l’eau

En collaboration avec l’hydroclimatologue Philippe Gachon, NÓS repense les berges industrielles du port de Montréal au profit du mouvement de l’eau, de la biodiversité et du bien-être de la population. Le secteur n’est presque plus industriel. L’équipe a travaillé avec l’hydroclimatologue Philippe Gachon qui explique que : « l’introduction d’espaces de liberté dans la planification urbaine favorise la résilience des infrastructures tout en créant de nouveaux milieux de vie. » Le site, jadis occupé par le port de Montréal, est largement inaccessible au public en 2019. Or, dans le scénario futuriste de NÓS, la métropole entretient un tout nouveau rapport avec le fleuve en 2067…

 

Philippe Lupien
LUPIEN + MATTEAU

Un musée, des environnements
Nouveau complexe muséal autour de la Biosphère

Lupien + Matteau conçoit un nouveau complexe muséal autour de la Biosphère, l’unique musée consacré entièrement aux liens entre société et environnement en Amérique du Nord. Alors que le musée actuel concentre ses activités dans un espace restreint — sous le dôme géodésique conçu pour le pavillon des États-Unis de l’Exposition universelle de 1967 —, sa réinvention pour 2067 par l’équipe réunie par Philippe Lupien greffe plusieurs sites voisins au complexe actuel. Dans 50 ans, le musée est pluriel et décloisonné. Il s’intègre à son milieu immédiat : parcs, berges, édifices et ponts.

 

Thomas Balaban
T B A

Meilleur avant 01/10/2070
Un centre de production alimentaire greffé à un échangeur autoroutier

En banlieue sud de l’île de Montréal, inséré dans un terrain vague de l’échangeur autoroutier 10-30, le site proposé par T B A devient un lieu de socialisation et de production alimentaire. Thomas Balaban décrit le tout comme un « Nœud productif habitable ». Pour éliminer la dépendance à une agriculture industrialisée et polluante, T B A, en collaboration avec l’urbaniste Dominic Bouchard, installent des infrastructures de production alimentaire locales, là où l’on trouvait des échangeurs autoroutiers.

Cet article MTL+ : 14 projets urbains innovants pour 2067 | Georges Adamczyk (#8) et Albert Mondor (#9) est apparu en premier sur Kollectif.

MTL+ : 14 projets urbains innovants pour 2067 | Georges Adamczyk (#8) et Albert Mondor (#9)

Kollectif a collaboré avec La Biosphère, Musée de l’environnement pour sa dernière exposition permanente, MTL+, qui met en scène les projets de 14 groupes d’architectes montréalais. Chacun réinvente une vaste infrastructure de la ville dans une exposition qui est un rare hommage à l’architecture et à l’urbanisme dans un musée dédié aux questions environnementales.

Le musée a demandé aux architectes d’imaginer à quoi ressemblerait la ville dans 50 ans. Plus précisément, on leur a demandé de choisir des infrastructures qui seraient devenues vétustes en 2067. Certains s’aventurent dans des propositions philosophiques, d’autres dans des propositions très techniques et ceci donne un panorama de ce qui constitue la réflexion architecturale d’aujourd’hui.

En accompagnement à l’exposition, Kollectif a réalisé 14 vidéos qui permettent de mettre un visage sur les architectes derrière ces 14 projets. Ces vidéos sont notamment présentées en français et en anglais dans une borne interactive à même la salle d’exposition de la Biosphère.

Dans une vidéo introductive, l’architecte Philippe Lupien présente le concept de MTL+ :

L’appel à idées lancé par le musée s’inscrit dans une démarche d’innovation des plus flexibles et interdisciplinaires possible. Le musée a demandé aux firmes invitées de collaborer avec des experts d’horizons différents dans l’objectif était de stimuler l’imagination et de libérer la créativité afin de faire naître de nouveaux grands projets urbains. En organisant cette exposition, la Biosphère souhaitait que les visiteurs retournent chez eux en ayant l’impression que la société est capable — ne serait-ce que par son pouvoir de projection dans l’avenir et de formulation d’idéaux — de prévoir des milieux de vie plus écoresponsables.

L’institution invite au dialogue entre science, culture et environnement depuis 25 ans. Au cours des années, le génie humain et la cohabitation avec l’environnement naturel sont l’essence même de toutes les activités de la Biosphère. L’exposition «?MTL+?», en rendant hommage aux architectes visionnaires qui nous aideront à bâtir l’avenir, fait aussi un clin d’œil à R. B. Fuller, concepteur de la Biosphère et l’un des pères de la pensée environnementale contemporaine. Ce qui rassemble les projets «?MTL+?», c’est l’espoir qu’ils inspirent un avenir meilleur basé sur le respect de l’environnement.

unnamed

 

** À noter les vidéos ci-dessous apparaîtront progressivement dans les prochaines semaines, suivant nos publications sur les réseaux sociaux.

 

David Giraldeau
PARA-SOL?

Promenade fluviale sur la voie maritime
13 km d’aménagements axés sur la santé, le plein air et la contemplation

En 2067, la population de la région montréalaise est si sérieuse et les besoins pour de nouveaux espaces publics si grands que le site s’est entièrement renouvelé. Les Montréalais peuvent dorénavant se détendre sur les rives du fleuve, où le plan d’eau est à son plus large. En collaboration avec l’entrepreneur Felix-Antoine Joli-Coeur, Para-Sol propose une requalification de la bande de terre localisée le long de la voie maritime entre le pont Victoria et l’écluse de Sainte-Catherine. La firme suggère un ruban terrestre de 13 km d’installations axées sur la santé, le plein air et la contemplation. Les citoyens et résidents de l’endroit accèdent au site rapidement et sans voiture et la digue est aménagée à la manière des promenades de bord de mer.

 

Juliette Patterson
CATALYSE URBAINE?

Grenouilles et graminées
Station d’épuration pour le Montréal de demain

Dans 50 ans, les eaux usées ne sont plus acheminées vers l’actuelle centrale d’épuration des eaux de Montréal. Elles sont nettoyées grâce à d’immenses marais filtrants. Ces eaux sont acheminées par gravité au point bas de la ville et proviennent du centre-ville et du quartier Pointe-Saint-Charles. Les marais d’épuration sont situés entre les ponts Champlain et Victoria. Ces bassins végétalisés y nettoient les eaux usées par l’action combinée des plantes, du vent et du soleil. L’autoroute, qui empêchait l’accès à la rive, est remplacée par une grande promenade riveraine. Un nouveau quartier s’articule autour d’une promenade verte centrale favorable à la biodiversité.

Réalisé en collaboration avec Claire Merckaert, ingénieure.

 

Gavin Affleck
AFFLECK DE LA RIVA

Mens sana in corpore sano
Parc de métaconsience au centre du fleuve

Dans ce scénario franchement utopiste réalisé en collaboration avec le géologue Michel Jébrak, un nouveau parc a pris forme. Il offre un lieu de ressourcement et de partage où l’énergie vitale de l’eau alimente le corps et l’esprit. Le Montréal de 2067 est sain physiquement et mentalement. La proposition repose sur l’hypothèse selon laquelle le 22e siècle est marqué par une découverte qui révolutionne notre compréhension du monde : la métaconscience et son développement et transmission dans l’eau. Un esprit sain dans un… fleuve sain !

 

Guillaume Éthier
(pour)? ARCHITECTURE MICROCLIMAT

L’échangeur
Espace de déconnexion attaché à une station de métro

Pour Architecture Microclimat, la pause n’est pas un luxe, mais une obligation de santé publique ! Les autorités fournissent des occasions de déconnexion numérique aux citoyens. Tant mieux, car en 2067, la technologie a conquis l’espace urbain et les citadins sont suivis dans chacun de leurs gestes au quotidien par les multiples systèmes d’une métropole hyperconnectée qui ne leur laisse aucun répit. Ceci prend la forme de lieux où les individus peuvent se recentrer ou échanger entre eux en toute simplicité, sans interfaces numériques et sans avalanches de données.

 

Hubert Pelletier
PELLETIER DE FONTENAY

Zones naturelles d’exclusion humaine (ZNEH)
Nouvel espace réservé à la nature au cœur de la ville

Dans un monde imaginaire, Pelletier de Fontenay et le biologiste Mathieu Madison imaginent que des critères de sélection ont permis aux urbanistes (dès 2022 !) de cerner les territoires idéaux pour établir de véritables forêts urbaines au cœur de la métropole. Les terrains choisis étaient mal aménagés, trop asphaltés ou mal gazonnés. Il s’agissait aussi de lieux dont la vocation était vouée à disparaître ou qui n’offraient plus de valeur sociale. Le cas des centres commerciaux vient tout de suite à l’esprit. Ceux-ci sont disparus depuis l’apparition de nouveaux modes de consommation (on est en 2067, rappelez-vous) ! On met donc de l’avant le concept très critiqué de « Zones naturelles d’exclusion humaine » ou « ZNHE ».

 

Randy Cohen
ATELIER BIG CITY

Montréal est une merveilleuse promenade
Espace de mobilité où il fait bon vivre

En collaboration avec l’entrepreneur montréalais Alexandre Taillefer, Big City réinvente un lieu de passage très fréquenté à Montréal et imagine un espace de mobilité où il fait bon vivre. L’infrastructure routière peu conviviale qu’est la rue Berri entre les rues Ontario et Cherrier n’est plus la même en 2067. L’artère avait d’abord été pensée pour le passage des voitures entre le centre-ville et le quartier du Plateau Mont?Royal, mais, dans le Montréal de demain, une nouvelle place, sur la rue Cherrier, domine cette zone et embellit le parcours menant du carré Saint-Louis au parc Lafontaine — deux lieux toujours très fréquentés par les Montréalais.

 

Peter Soland
CIVILITI

Libérer la rue
Réinvention à grande échelle de rues et de ruelles

Peter Soland explique comment son équipe a été amenée à requalifier la « trame urbaine » à grande échelle : les rues et ruelles du Plateau-Mont-Royal. Essentiellement, c’est une opération de déminéralisation qui a été effectuée. C’est dans ce contexte que la rue devient, peu à peu, un véritable milieu de vie pour les citoyens. Si des corridors minimaux ont été maintenus pour les véhicules d’urgence, le bitume a graduellement fait place à des boisés, à des prés, et même à des milieux humides.

Réalisé en collaboration avec Carmela Cucuzzella, professeur en design.

 

Georges Adamczyk
(pour)?STUDIO JEAN VERVILLE?

Prochaine station
Requalification du territoire ferroviaire entre deux quartiers limitrophes

L’équipe de Studio Jean Verville voit à la requalification du territoire ferroviaire entre deux quartiers limitrophes. Un long tracé de chemin de fer impose une infranchissable frontière entre deux communautés qui ont pourtant tout à partager. La mise en place d’un train suspendu à sustentation magnétique permet de fusionner les deux quartiers. L’utilisation du couloir aérien permet non seulement de conserver cette importante artère de flux de marchandises, mais aussi d’activer une nouvelle ligne de transport de passagers.

Réalisé en collaboration avec la géographe Nathalie Molines.

 

Albert Mondor
CONSORTIUM VERT L’AVENIR

Métropoligne 40
Grands potagers et vergers sur une autoroute urbaine

Albert Mondor explique pourquoi son équipe en est venue à proposer une requalification complète de la portion de l’autoroute transcanadienne entre les boulevards Saint-Laurent et Pie-IX. Le lieu devient vergers et potagers géants sur une autoroute urbaine futuriste. Pour recréer ce grand jardin, en plus de végétaux nectarifères attirant les insectes pollinisateurs, diverses plantes légumières et fruitières sont massivement cultivées. Un marché public où sont vendues les denrées comestibles produites localement est ouvert à l’année.

Réalisé en collaboration avec l’horticulteur Bertrand Dumont.

 

Antonio Di Bacco
ATELIER BARDA

Figure-fond
Interprétation de la carrière Francon

L’équipe a travaillé avec un philosophe allemand, Rafael Ziegler. Celui-ci décrit le projet avec lyrisme : «?Chérissez l’eau?; ses flots vous entraîneront dans une ancienne friche industrielle, où le roc offre tranquillité et régénération.?» Atelier Barda réinterprète la carrière Francon. En 2067, des bassins filtrent les eaux usées de ce secteur de la ville. Leur circuit de purification, visible et accessible, offre aux citoyens des plans d’eaux qui favorisent la détente et les loisirs, y compris la baignade. L’eau est filtrée à travers une succession de plateaux. Des zones de sédimentation, de filtration et de lagunage remplacent le système de gestion des eaux usées.

 

Pierre-Yves Diehl
COLLECTIF ESCARGO?

Le laboratoire des lucioles
Réintroduction de la vie sur un site industriel

Le « laboratoire des lucioles » est la réinvention complète des raffineries de l’est (Pointe-aux-Trembles sur l’ile de Montréal). L’objectif: y réintroduire la vie. En collaboration avec la géographe Taika Baillargeon, Collectif Escargo propose un parc de 21 km2 qui devient en 2067 un immense laboratoire sur la biolumiscence et qui comporte aussi des espaces culturels. Comme le pétrole n’est presque plus utilisé en 2067, l’immense complexe pétrochimique a été délaissé. Et le réaménagement du territoire s’est fait dans le respect de ce patrimoine industriel où s’enchevêtrent des milliers de kilomètres de pompes et d’oléoducs.

 

Gil Hardy
NÓS

Espaces de liberté
Requalification de berges industrielles au profit du mouvement de l’eau

En collaboration avec l’hydroclimatologue Philippe Gachon, NÓS repense les berges industrielles du port de Montréal au profit du mouvement de l’eau, de la biodiversité et du bien-être de la population. Le secteur n’est presque plus industriel. L’équipe a travaillé avec l’hydroclimatologue Philippe Gachon qui explique que : « l’introduction d’espaces de liberté dans la planification urbaine favorise la résilience des infrastructures tout en créant de nouveaux milieux de vie. » Le site, jadis occupé par le port de Montréal, est largement inaccessible au public en 2019. Or, dans le scénario futuriste de NÓS, la métropole entretient un tout nouveau rapport avec le fleuve en 2067…

 

Philippe Lupien
LUPIEN + MATTEAU

Un musée, des environnements
Nouveau complexe muséal autour de la Biosphère

Lupien + Matteau conçoit un nouveau complexe muséal autour de la Biosphère, l’unique musée consacré entièrement aux liens entre société et environnement en Amérique du Nord. Alors que le musée actuel concentre ses activités dans un espace restreint — sous le dôme géodésique conçu pour le pavillon des États-Unis de l’Exposition universelle de 1967 —, sa réinvention pour 2067 par l’équipe réunie par Philippe Lupien greffe plusieurs sites voisins au complexe actuel. Dans 50 ans, le musée est pluriel et décloisonné. Il s’intègre à son milieu immédiat : parcs, berges, édifices et ponts.

 

Thomas Balaban
T B A

Meilleur avant 01/10/2070
Un centre de production alimentaire greffé à un échangeur autoroutier

En banlieue sud de l’île de Montréal, inséré dans un terrain vague de l’échangeur autoroutier 10-30, le site proposé par T B A devient un lieu de socialisation et de production alimentaire. Thomas Balaban décrit le tout comme un « Nœud productif habitable ». Pour éliminer la dépendance à une agriculture industrialisée et polluante, T B A, en collaboration avec l’urbaniste Dominic Bouchard, installent des infrastructures de production alimentaire locales, là où l’on trouvait des échangeurs autoroutiers.

Cet article MTL+ : 14 projets urbains innovants pour 2067 | Georges Adamczyk (#8) et Albert Mondor (#9) est apparu en premier sur Kollectif.

MTL+ : 14 projets urbains innovants pour 2067 | Georges Adamczyk (#8) et Albert Mondor (#9)

Kollectif a collaboré avec La Biosphère, Musée de l’environnement pour sa dernière exposition permanente, MTL+, qui met en scène les projets de 14 groupes d’architectes montréalais. Chacun réinvente une vaste infrastructure de la ville dans une exposition qui est un rare hommage à l’architecture et à l’urbanisme dans un musée dédié aux questions environnementales.

Le musée a demandé aux architectes d’imaginer à quoi ressemblerait la ville dans 50 ans. Plus précisément, on leur a demandé de choisir des infrastructures qui seraient devenues vétustes en 2067. Certains s’aventurent dans des propositions philosophiques, d’autres dans des propositions très techniques et ceci donne un panorama de ce qui constitue la réflexion architecturale d’aujourd’hui.

En accompagnement à l’exposition, Kollectif a réalisé 14 vidéos qui permettent de mettre un visage sur les architectes derrière ces 14 projets. Ces vidéos sont notamment présentées en français et en anglais dans une borne interactive à même la salle d’exposition de la Biosphère.

Dans une vidéo introductive, l’architecte Philippe Lupien présente le concept de MTL+ :

L’appel à idées lancé par le musée s’inscrit dans une démarche d’innovation des plus flexibles et interdisciplinaires possible. Le musée a demandé aux firmes invitées de collaborer avec des experts d’horizons différents dans l’objectif était de stimuler l’imagination et de libérer la créativité afin de faire naître de nouveaux grands projets urbains. En organisant cette exposition, la Biosphère souhaitait que les visiteurs retournent chez eux en ayant l’impression que la société est capable — ne serait-ce que par son pouvoir de projection dans l’avenir et de formulation d’idéaux — de prévoir des milieux de vie plus écoresponsables.

L’institution invite au dialogue entre science, culture et environnement depuis 25 ans. Au cours des années, le génie humain et la cohabitation avec l’environnement naturel sont l’essence même de toutes les activités de la Biosphère. L’exposition «?MTL+?», en rendant hommage aux architectes visionnaires qui nous aideront à bâtir l’avenir, fait aussi un clin d’œil à R. B. Fuller, concepteur de la Biosphère et l’un des pères de la pensée environnementale contemporaine. Ce qui rassemble les projets «?MTL+?», c’est l’espoir qu’ils inspirent un avenir meilleur basé sur le respect de l’environnement.

unnamed

 

** À noter les vidéos ci-dessous apparaîtront progressivement dans les prochaines semaines, suivant nos publications sur les réseaux sociaux.

 

David Giraldeau
PARA-SOL?

Promenade fluviale sur la voie maritime
13 km d’aménagements axés sur la santé, le plein air et la contemplation

En 2067, la population de la région montréalaise est si sérieuse et les besoins pour de nouveaux espaces publics si grands que le site s’est entièrement renouvelé. Les Montréalais peuvent dorénavant se détendre sur les rives du fleuve, où le plan d’eau est à son plus large. En collaboration avec l’entrepreneur Felix-Antoine Joli-Coeur, Para-Sol propose une requalification de la bande de terre localisée le long de la voie maritime entre le pont Victoria et l’écluse de Sainte-Catherine. La firme suggère un ruban terrestre de 13 km d’installations axées sur la santé, le plein air et la contemplation. Les citoyens et résidents de l’endroit accèdent au site rapidement et sans voiture et la digue est aménagée à la manière des promenades de bord de mer.

 

Juliette Patterson
CATALYSE URBAINE?

Grenouilles et graminées
Station d’épuration pour le Montréal de demain

Dans 50 ans, les eaux usées ne sont plus acheminées vers l’actuelle centrale d’épuration des eaux de Montréal. Elles sont nettoyées grâce à d’immenses marais filtrants. Ces eaux sont acheminées par gravité au point bas de la ville et proviennent du centre-ville et du quartier Pointe-Saint-Charles. Les marais d’épuration sont situés entre les ponts Champlain et Victoria. Ces bassins végétalisés y nettoient les eaux usées par l’action combinée des plantes, du vent et du soleil. L’autoroute, qui empêchait l’accès à la rive, est remplacée par une grande promenade riveraine. Un nouveau quartier s’articule autour d’une promenade verte centrale favorable à la biodiversité.

Réalisé en collaboration avec Claire Merckaert, ingénieure.

 

Gavin Affleck
AFFLECK DE LA RIVA

Mens sana in corpore sano
Parc de métaconsience au centre du fleuve

Dans ce scénario franchement utopiste réalisé en collaboration avec le géologue Michel Jébrak, un nouveau parc a pris forme. Il offre un lieu de ressourcement et de partage où l’énergie vitale de l’eau alimente le corps et l’esprit. Le Montréal de 2067 est sain physiquement et mentalement. La proposition repose sur l’hypothèse selon laquelle le 22e siècle est marqué par une découverte qui révolutionne notre compréhension du monde : la métaconscience et son développement et transmission dans l’eau. Un esprit sain dans un… fleuve sain !

 

Guillaume Éthier
(pour)? ARCHITECTURE MICROCLIMAT

L’échangeur
Espace de déconnexion attaché à une station de métro

Pour Architecture Microclimat, la pause n’est pas un luxe, mais une obligation de santé publique ! Les autorités fournissent des occasions de déconnexion numérique aux citoyens. Tant mieux, car en 2067, la technologie a conquis l’espace urbain et les citadins sont suivis dans chacun de leurs gestes au quotidien par les multiples systèmes d’une métropole hyperconnectée qui ne leur laisse aucun répit. Ceci prend la forme de lieux où les individus peuvent se recentrer ou échanger entre eux en toute simplicité, sans interfaces numériques et sans avalanches de données.

 

Hubert Pelletier
PELLETIER DE FONTENAY

Zones naturelles d’exclusion humaine (ZNEH)
Nouvel espace réservé à la nature au cœur de la ville

Dans un monde imaginaire, Pelletier de Fontenay et le biologiste Mathieu Madison imaginent que des critères de sélection ont permis aux urbanistes (dès 2022 !) de cerner les territoires idéaux pour établir de véritables forêts urbaines au cœur de la métropole. Les terrains choisis étaient mal aménagés, trop asphaltés ou mal gazonnés. Il s’agissait aussi de lieux dont la vocation était vouée à disparaître ou qui n’offraient plus de valeur sociale. Le cas des centres commerciaux vient tout de suite à l’esprit. Ceux-ci sont disparus depuis l’apparition de nouveaux modes de consommation (on est en 2067, rappelez-vous) ! On met donc de l’avant le concept très critiqué de « Zones naturelles d’exclusion humaine » ou « ZNHE ».

 

Randy Cohen
ATELIER BIG CITY

Montréal est une merveilleuse promenade
Espace de mobilité où il fait bon vivre

En collaboration avec l’entrepreneur montréalais Alexandre Taillefer, Big City réinvente un lieu de passage très fréquenté à Montréal et imagine un espace de mobilité où il fait bon vivre. L’infrastructure routière peu conviviale qu’est la rue Berri entre les rues Ontario et Cherrier n’est plus la même en 2067. L’artère avait d’abord été pensée pour le passage des voitures entre le centre-ville et le quartier du Plateau Mont?Royal, mais, dans le Montréal de demain, une nouvelle place, sur la rue Cherrier, domine cette zone et embellit le parcours menant du carré Saint-Louis au parc Lafontaine — deux lieux toujours très fréquentés par les Montréalais.

 

Peter Soland
CIVILITI

Libérer la rue
Réinvention à grande échelle de rues et de ruelles

Peter Soland explique comment son équipe a été amenée à requalifier la « trame urbaine » à grande échelle : les rues et ruelles du Plateau-Mont-Royal. Essentiellement, c’est une opération de déminéralisation qui a été effectuée. C’est dans ce contexte que la rue devient, peu à peu, un véritable milieu de vie pour les citoyens. Si des corridors minimaux ont été maintenus pour les véhicules d’urgence, le bitume a graduellement fait place à des boisés, à des prés, et même à des milieux humides.

Réalisé en collaboration avec Carmela Cucuzzella, professeur en design.

 

Georges Adamczyk
(pour)?STUDIO JEAN VERVILLE?

Prochaine station
Requalification du territoire ferroviaire entre deux quartiers limitrophes

L’équipe de Studio Jean Verville voit à la requalification du territoire ferroviaire entre deux quartiers limitrophes. Un long tracé de chemin de fer impose une infranchissable frontière entre deux communautés qui ont pourtant tout à partager. La mise en place d’un train suspendu à sustentation magnétique permet de fusionner les deux quartiers. L’utilisation du couloir aérien permet non seulement de conserver cette importante artère de flux de marchandises, mais aussi d’activer une nouvelle ligne de transport de passagers.

Réalisé en collaboration avec la géographe Nathalie Molines.

 

Albert Mondor
CONSORTIUM VERT L’AVENIR

Métropoligne 40
Grands potagers et vergers sur une autoroute urbaine

Albert Mondor explique pourquoi son équipe en est venue à proposer une requalification complète de la portion de l’autoroute transcanadienne entre les boulevards Saint-Laurent et Pie-IX. Le lieu devient vergers et potagers géants sur une autoroute urbaine futuriste. Pour recréer ce grand jardin, en plus de végétaux nectarifères attirant les insectes pollinisateurs, diverses plantes légumières et fruitières sont massivement cultivées. Un marché public où sont vendues les denrées comestibles produites localement est ouvert à l’année.

Réalisé en collaboration avec l’horticulteur Bertrand Dumont.

 

Antonio Di Bacco
ATELIER BARDA

Figure-fond
Interprétation de la carrière Francon

L’équipe a travaillé avec un philosophe allemand, Rafael Ziegler. Celui-ci décrit le projet avec lyrisme : «?Chérissez l’eau?; ses flots vous entraîneront dans une ancienne friche industrielle, où le roc offre tranquillité et régénération.?» Atelier Barda réinterprète la carrière Francon. En 2067, des bassins filtrent les eaux usées de ce secteur de la ville. Leur circuit de purification, visible et accessible, offre aux citoyens des plans d’eaux qui favorisent la détente et les loisirs, y compris la baignade. L’eau est filtrée à travers une succession de plateaux. Des zones de sédimentation, de filtration et de lagunage remplacent le système de gestion des eaux usées.

 

Pierre-Yves Diehl
COLLECTIF ESCARGO?

Le laboratoire des lucioles
Réintroduction de la vie sur un site industriel

Le « laboratoire des lucioles » est la réinvention complète des raffineries de l’est (Pointe-aux-Trembles sur l’ile de Montréal). L’objectif: y réintroduire la vie. En collaboration avec la géographe Taika Baillargeon, Collectif Escargo propose un parc de 21 km2 qui devient en 2067 un immense laboratoire sur la biolumiscence et qui comporte aussi des espaces culturels. Comme le pétrole n’est presque plus utilisé en 2067, l’immense complexe pétrochimique a été délaissé. Et le réaménagement du territoire s’est fait dans le respect de ce patrimoine industriel où s’enchevêtrent des milliers de kilomètres de pompes et d’oléoducs.

 

Gil Hardy
NÓS

Espaces de liberté
Requalification de berges industrielles au profit du mouvement de l’eau

En collaboration avec l’hydroclimatologue Philippe Gachon, NÓS repense les berges industrielles du port de Montréal au profit du mouvement de l’eau, de la biodiversité et du bien-être de la population. Le secteur n’est presque plus industriel. L’équipe a travaillé avec l’hydroclimatologue Philippe Gachon qui explique que : « l’introduction d’espaces de liberté dans la planification urbaine favorise la résilience des infrastructures tout en créant de nouveaux milieux de vie. » Le site, jadis occupé par le port de Montréal, est largement inaccessible au public en 2019. Or, dans le scénario futuriste de NÓS, la métropole entretient un tout nouveau rapport avec le fleuve en 2067…

 

Philippe Lupien
LUPIEN + MATTEAU

Un musée, des environnements
Nouveau complexe muséal autour de la Biosphère

Lupien + Matteau conçoit un nouveau complexe muséal autour de la Biosphère, l’unique musée consacré entièrement aux liens entre société et environnement en Amérique du Nord. Alors que le musée actuel concentre ses activités dans un espace restreint — sous le dôme géodésique conçu pour le pavillon des États-Unis de l’Exposition universelle de 1967 —, sa réinvention pour 2067 par l’équipe réunie par Philippe Lupien greffe plusieurs sites voisins au complexe actuel. Dans 50 ans, le musée est pluriel et décloisonné. Il s’intègre à son milieu immédiat : parcs, berges, édifices et ponts.

 

Thomas Balaban
T B A

Meilleur avant 01/10/2070
Un centre de production alimentaire greffé à un échangeur autoroutier

En banlieue sud de l’île de Montréal, inséré dans un terrain vague de l’échangeur autoroutier 10-30, le site proposé par T B A devient un lieu de socialisation et de production alimentaire. Thomas Balaban décrit le tout comme un « Nœud productif habitable ». Pour éliminer la dépendance à une agriculture industrialisée et polluante, T B A, en collaboration avec l’urbaniste Dominic Bouchard, installent des infrastructures de production alimentaire locales, là où l’on trouvait des échangeurs autoroutiers.

Cet article MTL+ : 14 projets urbains innovants pour 2067 | Georges Adamczyk (#8) et Albert Mondor (#9) est apparu en premier sur Kollectif.

Entretien en ligne | Branchez-vous ! Parlons d’architecture

Annonce :

« Le Centre de design de l’UQAM présente l’exposition Devoirs d’architecture : 6 concours d’écoles primaires au Québec.

Étant donné l’impossibilité de vous accueillir en personne pour le vernissage de l’exposition en raison des consignes de distanciation sociale, mais pour maintenir la tradition de nos ouvertures festives, nous vous invitons à vous brancher pour notre tout premier entretien en ligne autour des enjeux liés à l’architecture des écoles primaires au Québec.

Mercredi 23 septembre à 17h00

Réservez votre place sur Zoom ou consultez en direct sur Facebook Live à 17 h.

Pour l’occasion, la discussion sera animée par Philippe Lupien, architecte et professeur à l’École de design de l’UQAM. Il s’entretiendra avec Jean-Pierre Chupin, commissaire de l’exposition, Pierre Thibault, membre fondateur du Lab-École, et Anne Cormier, coordinatrice du concours étudiant. Ils discuteront entre autres du déroulement des concours et de leur rôle dans l’atteinte de l’excellence en architecture.

Nous vous rappelons que l’exposition sera présentée du 24 septembre au 22 novembre 2020. Cet ensemble foisonnant de projets témoigne d’une immense capacité d’analyse et d’invention déployée par des équipes d’architectes expérimentés autant que par des architectes en formation, autour de la question stimulante et difficile de l’architecture des écoles primaires au Québec. »

Inscription gratuite, mais obligatoire…


Pour visiter le site internet du Centre de design de l’UQAM…

Cet article Entretien en ligne | Branchez-vous ! Parlons d’architecture est apparu en premier sur Kollectif.

RSS College Art Association

  • Assistant Professor in Writing for Film and Television | Emerson College
    Boston, Massachusetts, Assistant Professor in Writing for Film and Television Emerson College Department of Visual and Media Arts Two Positions: Assistant Professor in Writing for Film and Television The Department of Visual and Media Arts at Emerson College invites applications for two tenure-track faculty positions in writing for film and television. The D […]
  • Terra Foundation for American Art Postdoctoral Teaching Fellowship | Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany
    Germany, Terra Foundation for American Art Postdoctoral Teaching Fellowship at the Institute of Art and Visual History at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin Two-year appointment from September 1, 2021 to August 31, 2023 Annual stipend: Euro equivalent of $56.200 (gross amount) Annual research and travel allowance: up to $7.500 for travel and conference attendanc […]
  • Full-Time, Tenure Track, Faculty in Art History and Visual Culture (Open Field) | Bard College
    Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, The Art History and Visual Culture Program at Bard College invites applications for an open field, tenure-track position. Candidates from the fields of art history, visual culture, archaeology, and material culture are encouraged to apply. The successful candidate for this position is dedicated to rethinking art history’s and v […]
  • Director/Curator, Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery | University of British Columbia
    Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, The Faculty of Arts at The University of British Columbia (UBC) – Vancouver campus invites applications for the position of Director/Curator, Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, with an anticipated start date of July 1, 2021. The successful candidate will hold an academic appointment concurrent with the directorship; the […]
  • 2021-2022 Fellowships at The Metropolitan Museum of Art | The Metropolitan Museum of Art
    New York, New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art welcomes applications from scholars of the history of art and visual culture, archaeology, conservation and related sciences, as well as those in other disciplines whose projects relate to objects in The Met’s collection. The tremendous diversity of fellows' projects reflects the historic and geographic […]
  • Assistant Professor of Photography | Utah State University - Caine College of the Arts
    Logan, Utah, The Department of Art + Design at Utah State University offers a tenure track, 9-month, Assistant Professor position in the photography program. The successful candidate will have teaching experience at the university level, strong technical knowledge, and the ability to develop and sustain an active program of creative activity. The candidate w […]
  • School of Art: Assistant Professor in Sculpture | The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley
    Edinburg , Texas, The School of Art at The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley ( UTRGV ) seeks applications for an Assistant Professor tenure track appointment in sculpture to start Spring 2021. Seeking a collaborative and energetic artist and educator, who will work diligently to create a dynamic program of sculpture at the School of Art. The ideal candid […]
  • Visiting Lecturer Graphic Design | University of Maryland, Baltimore County, UMBC
    Baltimore, Maryland, Visiting Lecturer Graphic Design Job no:  493183 Work type:  Faculty Location:  UMBC Campus Categories:  Visual Arts Application Instructions:  Apply via Interfolio at:    https://apply.interfolio.com/74470 Submit 8-12 samples of professional design work with supporting descriptions that summarize your contributions, 8-12 examples of stu […]
  • Chair of the School of Industrial Design | Georgia Tech, College of Design
    Atlanta, Georgia, Chair of the School of Industrial Design College of Design Georgia Institute of Technology   The College of Design at Georgia Institute of Technology invites nominations and applications for the position of Chair of the School of Industrial Design in Atlanta, Georgia. The School offers a B.S. in Industrial Design and a Master of Industrial […]
  • One Full-time Associate Professor or Lecturer(Environmental Design) | kyoto City University of Arts
    Kyoto, Japan, Areas of responsibility Environmental Design Faculty of Fine Arts: “Foundation of Design 1, 2,” “Environmental Design,” “Foundation Core Courses,” and “Interdisciplinary Seminar” Graduate School of Arts Master’s Course: “Study on Environmental Design 1-4” and “Special Seminar 1-4” Graduate School of Arts Doctoral Course: “Guidance in Specialize […]

RSS inside higher ed architecture

RSS inside higher ed: outside architecture